The Six Best Concerts in Colorado This Weekend

Categories: Best Concerts

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Nathaniel Rateliff's 9th Holiday Show is tonight at the Ogden.
It's a little bit of a quiet weekend in Denver, but there are still plenty of great shows, including Nathaniel Rateliff pulling double-duty tonight at the Ogden and T/SMM at Glob.

The rest of our picks follow! Enjoy your weekend.

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Telluride Bluegrass Festival 2015 Lineup Includes Ry Cooder, Kacey Musgraves and More

Categories: Music Festivals

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Benko Photos
THIS IS A REAL PLACE, SOMEHOW.
The 42nd Telluride Bluegrass Festival will take place from June 18 to 21, 2015. As they often do, four day passes sold out before the lineup was even announced (it took ten minutes for fans from all 50 states and several foreign countries to snatch them all up). You can still buy single-day tickets for Thursday and Sunday, however, and camping passes are available.

Today, all those trusting souls learn what exactly they bought tickets to see. We suspect they won't be disappointed. Headlining next year's festival will be Ry Cooder, Sharon White & Ricky Skaggs. Many more big names from the world of bluegrass music (and slightly beyond) join them -- see the full list below.

See also: Telluride Bluegrass Festival's Longtime MC Reflects on Colorado's Most Storied Music Fest

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Eight Ways Legal Weed Has Changed Colorado's Music Scene

Categories: Commentary

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Eric Gruneisen
Heaven is real.
It's now been almost an entire year since marijuana was legalized for recreational use here in Colorado. The experiment, by most accounts, has been a successful one, with other states following in our footsteps. It seems inevitable that we'll see the entire country follow in the next decade.

Although, because recreational marijuana has been legal for several years, things didn't change a whole lot here in terms of the availability of pot, the boom has made a substantial impact on all kinds of tangential industries: Music, for example. Here are a few of the ways recreational weed has changed Colorado's music scene.

See also: Photos: Musicians Buying (Legal) Weed in Denver

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A Guide to Denver's Goth and Industrial Scene

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Tom Murphy
Echo Beds | The Shitbiscuit in Minneapolis, MN | October 25, 2014
The Goth and industrial bands from Denver enjoyed a kind of heyday in the '90s in Denver, with several active bands playing live. There was even a high-profile festival for a handful of years: the Denver Dark Arts Festival (later Tte Colorado Dark Arts Festival). When the momentum behind any unity in that scene ran out of steam a handful of years ago, you could still meet up with fellow appreciators of that music at dance nights at the Church and various other venues including now at Milk on Saturdays and the last Monday of the month at the hi-diive. But with the rediscovery of Goth and industrial music by a new generation of listeners it seems like it is now a kind of renaissance. Until that gets into full swing here are some photos of that scene as it was and to some extent is now.

See also: Don't Look at These Photos From Skinny Puppy's Denver Show While Eating

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Bummeroo: The Internet Music Festival You Can Enjoy From the Comfort of Your Couch

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Sweet couch, man: David Castillo, the dude behind Bummeroo.
"I had never really gone to music festivals until last year, when I went because I was playing them. I thought, this fucking blows. I didn't like the experience at all -- I see a bunch of people I like, but it's not fun. It's harder for me to be around that many people-- it's always like, what's the smallest corner I can hide in?"

David Castillo is talking about his experience with his project, Pizza Time, playing some of the bigger music festivals that now cram concert-going calendars nine months out of the year. Recently, Castillo was talking to a friend about putting on a festival of his own, the kind of festival he would like to go to. The fest idea morphed into a pretty radical one: an all online music festival that anyone could be a part of and witness from the comfort of their own computer. The first ever Bummeroo, a day-long music, comedy and performance art extravaganza will begin uploading this Sunday, December 21 and can be watched from anywhere through the Pizza Time YouTube channel.

See also: Album Review: Dirty Demos - Pizza Time

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The City of Denver Wants to Build an Affordable Place for Musicians to Live and Work

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Artspace Loveland
An event held at the future site of Artspace Loveland (opening in 2015).
It is no secret that rent in Denver is climbing rapidly -- so much so, in fact, that some artists feel they can no longer afford to live in the city.

The Arts & Venues department of the city's government wants to help. Together with the Minneapolis-based nonprofit Artspace, it hopes to build a space in the RiNo district to accommodate the needs of artists (very much including musicians). "We're trying to make sure all kinds of art are represented," says Create Denver program administrator Lisa Gedgaudas. She is overseeing a preliminary survey open to all artists that will help inform the design of and approach to the new space.

Take the survey here!

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Guy Gerber Dishes About Broken-Up Beach Parties and 11:11

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Mikele Tabuki
Guy Gerber
The last time we talked to Guy Gerber (in 2012), the up-and-coming electronic music producer and DJ told us about his new project with P.Diddy, 11:11 -- which was just released this year. Gerber will be back in Denver to play a show at Beta this Saturday night, December 20; this time when we talked to him, he told us about what the hold-up was with the much-anticipated (and, frankly, stellar) Diddy collab and how he spent his summer disrupting the Ibiza scene with his secret underground project.

See also: Guy Gerber on his scorching Fabric mix and how Facebook affects the electronic scene

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2014 Was the Year That EDM Died

Categories: Features

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Aaron Thackeray
DEEP, DEEP SIGH.
The last major electronic show I attended was Porter Robinson's World's tour. The 21-year-old DJ used to be known for his wild drops and ultra-fast techno sounds, as heard in his 2011 hit single Spitfire. But in his newest album, he uses sampling to thread together beautiful melodies with gut-wrentching drops that are more emotional than firey in the way that dubstep drops are.

This album, along with other hit down-tempo albums like ODESZA's In Return and newly-popular ambient artists like Kygo, Tycho, Cashmere Cat, Emancipator, Miike Snow, Kaskade and more, point to the downfall of EDM as the culture suffocates in a mass of corporate money, extreme hyped culture, and a fan base absorbed in the scene rather than the song.

See also: Why I Can't Take "EDM" Seriously

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Why I Wasn't Quite Ready for My Favorite Band to Make A Comeback

Categories: Justify My Love

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There's something about carrying a torch for art that no one else seems to give a fuck about -- when you love a band or a record or an artist so deeply but goes unnoticed by the general populace it starts to feel like it's your own special secret to keep. Not to say that the rest of the world didn't care about the Red Aunts' existence in the mid '90s, but I was, until recently, hard pressed to find anyone else who liked the band as much as I did, let alone knew who they were (present company of my fellow Westword contributor and Red Aunts fan Tom Murphy excluded.)

Earlier this month after a long time away, the Long Beach band released Come Up For A Closer Look, a greatest hits compilation of sorts. At first, when I saw that Noisey was streaming the album, I was excited. And then my covetous self appeared -- oh, so now people care about my favorite band that no one gave a shit about in 1995 or 2005 or even 2013? Of course, I loved that the Red Aunts were maybe back in action, but I was mad. I wanted them to stay mine.

See also: Seeing Red: The Red Aunts Have No Relation to Punk Cliches

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Nine Things You Should Know About the City of Denver's New Ticketing Deal with AXS

Categories: Music News

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Aaron Thackeray
All shows at Red Rocks will be ticketed through AXS under the terms of the new contract.
On November 17, Denver City Council passed an ordinance establishing AXS, a ticketing company co-owned by Anschutz Entertainment Group, as the exclusive ticketing provider from January 1, 2015, until December 31, 2019, for venues owned by the City of Denver. You can read all 47 thrilling pages of the agreement here.

The locations covered by the contract are: Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Denver Coliseum, Ellie Caulkins Opera House, the Buell Theatre, Boettcher Concert Hall, the McNichols Building, Bellco Theatre, the Denver Performing Arts Complex (that's any events in the Galleria or the Sculpture Park) and the Colorado Convention Center.

Basically, that means that for the next five years, whenever you go to an event at any of those venues (including the Great American Beer Festival, certain touring theatrical productions and the many concerts at Red Rocks), you'll buy your ticket through AXS. The arrangement has brought up numerous questions from numerous people. Here are the answers to a few of them.

See also: 50 Photos That Prove Red Rocks Is the Most Beautiful Venue on the Planet

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