The best punk shows in Denver in December

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Lord Blasto

JELLO BIAFRA & GUANTANAMO SCHOOL OF MEDICINE at SUMMIT | 12/31
Jello Biafra first came to the attention of the world as the charismatic, hyperkinetic and relentlessly intelligent frontman of the Dead Kennedys. Never one to mince words, Biafra became a lightning rod with his unapologetic critiques of the regressive swing of American culture in the '80s, as well as the effects of the country's imperialistic ambitions. In his latest band, Biafra is joined by Victims Family's Ralph Spight and Andrew Weiss (who played in the Rollins Band for years as well as Ween and Butthole Surfers). The group's latest album, White People and the Damage Done, may sound like a cross between power pop and fuzzed-out punk, but the title of the album and the irreverent, pointed lyrics are proof that Biafra hasn't lost his touch.

See also: All upcoming concerts in our constantly updated Denver concert calendar

TUES | THE DWARVES at MOE'S ORIGINAL BBQ | 12/31/13
Starting out in Chicago as the Suburban Nightmare, the Dwarves quickly ditched their early hardcore sound for something less narrow. The band subsequently cultivated a perverse sense of humor and a stage show worthy of GG Allin, and the members played out under such pseudonyms as HeWhoCannotBeNamed and Blag Dalia -- like mock serial-killer counterparts to the Misfits. Seemingly bent on offending everyone, the Dwarves were notorious for tasteless album art and a stunt in which they announced the death of HeWhoCannotBeNamed with a tribute to the "late" guitarist in the liner notes of 1993's Sugarfix, which caused their label to drop them. What's lost amid the scandalous on-stage behavior and pranks is the fact that the Dwarves are a potent live band to this day, performing some of the only legit punk rock left.

SUN | SUICIDAL TENDENCIES at FOX THEATRE | 12/8/13
One of the early adopters of thrash and even funk elements in its punk rock DNA, Suicidal Tendencies had a longer career than many of its peers from the early hardcore days, and it even enjoyed a period of relative commercial success in the early 1980s. The band's left field hit single "Institutionalized" became an anthem for disaffected youth for generations, and may even be more recognized than its 1992 hit, "Nobody Hears." The group's 1987 album Join the Army helped to define the sound of crossover, and the 1992 album The Art of Rebellion broke Suicidal to the mainstream. Still a powerful and fun live act, Suicidal released its thirteenth album, 13 earlier this year.


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