What to expect from the Glitch Mob's weekend in Denver

Categories: Interviews

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The Glitch Mob's new stage setup is called the Blade, and it consists of three structures that resemble turbines. "We collaborated with Martin Phillips. He took a liking to us early on," says bandmember Josh "Ooah" Mayer. Known for co-creating Daft Punk's famed Pyramid for the Alive tour in 2006 and 2007, as well as Deadmau5's Cube setup, Phillips is no stranger to electronic-music fans.

"What he does is take our vision and help bring it to life," says bandmate Justin Boreta.
But Mayer remembers a time not so long ago when he, Boreta and Edward Ma had to bring their own visions to life. "At one point, we went to Home Depot and bought tubes and hung lights on them and programmed them in our living room," he says. "Every element has been done from the ground up. It's been an honor and a blessing; it never gets old. Just today at the venue, seeing all the stuff, I got chills."

The Glitch Mob will bring the Blade to Denver this weekend with a pair of shows at the Fillmore Auditorium this Friday and Saturday.

There are plenty of electronic acts with little more to offer than a laptop and charisma. But for these three, simply pressing "play" has never been enough. The band's attention to detail extends beyond the set to the music itself, which is one reason the Glitch Mob went four years (an eternity in the genre) between releases. "It is a long time,"
acknowledges Boreta. "The way the musical culture has evolved, it's a constant barrage of music. We believe in the album. It's not the strongest marketing and business move, and we used to do that. It's how we started our career."

In the early days of the Glitch Mob, when Matthew "Kraddy" Kratz and Kitty-D were still in the picture, the group remixed everything from Sound Tribe Sector 9 to Nalepa. But that style got old, and as the group solidified its three-piece lineup, it started to develop a distinct sound. Debut full-length Drink the Sea features slithering melodies that build on staccato drums and crash triumphantly; they could easily fit into the dark climax of any Tim Burton film. But that sound didn't reflect what the Glitch Mob really cared about; the music was written before the group knew how to interact with the massive festival crowds it would soon attract.

"We wrote [Drink the Sea] in a vacuum," says Boreta. "The energy and emotion in headphones is way different than a live show. There's an intangible quality with moving groups of people. We learned what works and what doesn't."

The time between albums allowed the Glitch Mob to perfect music meant to be heard in a crowd. "With the old stuff, we went for a specific analog, crunchy, lo-fi sound," says Mayer. "With [the new Love Death Immortality], we wanted to try something different. We want a big, cleaner, up-front sound."

Even with those goals in mind, the group offers a more challenging sound than many of their peers in the EDM scene. "It just so happens that the experience we provide is more multifaceted," says Boreta. "Some don't like it and some love it. We are the oddballs of the field."

In addition to the group's two night run at the Fillmore, the Glitch Mob will be doing an in-store meet and greet at Twist & Shout Records on Friday, April 25. The meet and great starts at 6 p.m. In order to guarantee a place in the autograph line, you must purchase any one of the Glitch Mob's albums. Twist & Shout will also be doing ticket giveaways for the shows.

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