Twenty fabled moments in Denver music: #16: Radiohead's gear gets jacked in 1995

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Here's the ad that ran in Westword for the Wednesday, October 4, 1995, show, which was originally slated to take place at the Mammoth Events Center.

Over the course of the next few weeks, Backbeat will be counting down the twenty most fabled moments in Denver music history. Today, a look back at the time when Radiohead had all of its gear stolen outside the Rockmada before a 1995 show at the Ogden Theatre.

Okay, so it's bad enough that Radiohead was Soul Asylum's opening act on its fall tour in 1995 -- perhaps the most upside-down bill since Hendrix opened for the Monkees in 1967 -- but, to add insult to annoyance, Radiohead's instruments were stolen the night before they played the Ogden that October. No trace of the band's gear has shown up since.

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Twenty fabled moments in Denver music: #17: Einsturzende Neubauten play '86 junkyard show

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Einstürzende Neubauten setting up for its junkyard performance in 1986.

Over the course of the next few weeks, Backbeat will be counting down the twenty most fabled moments in Denver music history. Today, a look back at Einstürzende Neubauten's 1986 show in a Commerce City junkyard.

Fabled Berlin industrial rock act Einstürzende Neubauten played perhaps one of the strangest shows in Denver's history. That's a big claim, but considering the circumstances -- the secret gig in a junkyard, the painted animal bones, the flaming oil drums -- this spectacle was one that has not been easily eclipsed in the 26 years since it happened.

See Also:
#20: Beatlemania at Red Rocks
#19: Michael Jackson's secretive stay in Denver
#18: Black Flag at the Rainbow Music Hall 1984


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Twenty fabled moments in Denver music, #18: Black Flag at the Rainbow Music Hall 1984

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The Nig-Heist on stage at the Rainbow Music Hall in 1984.

Over the course of the next few weeks, Backbeat will be counting down the twenty most fabled moments in Denver music history. Today, a look back at Black Flag's 1984 show at the Rainbow Music Hall that ended with members of the opening act being arrested.

You may have heard about this one; it was notorious enough to merit a mention in Get In the Van,the 1994 memoir penned by Henry Rollins about life on the road with Black Flag: On April 25, 1984 at the Rainbow Music Hall, Nig-Heist, Black Flag's opening act, led by the band's iconic roadie Steve "Mugger" Corbin, played a, uh, stripped-down set that landed Corbin and Tom Trocolli in a Denver jail cell after the set. Almost three decades later, feelings over the whole incident are still a little raw for Corbin.

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Twenty fabled moments in Denver music: #19: Michael Jackson hides out here in 1984

Over the course of the next few weeks, Backbeat will be counting down the twenty most fabled moments in Denver music history. Today, a look back at Michael Jackson's week-long stay here in Mile High City in 1984 and the secrecy surrounding it.

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Long before Michael Jackson's name became shorthand for "troubled pop star," he was arguably the most heavily publicized musician in the world. His fame was such that midway through a 1984 tour, the then 26-year-old singer decided to hide out in Denver for a week, with extra-tight security ensuring the King of Pop's privacy and security.

The pressure must have been indescribable. There was Michael, a guy who had grown up very publicly and had hardly known what most of us think of as a normal upbringing, performing for hundreds of thousands of fans. Joined by his brothers, the Victory Tour was to be the last time the Jacksons would tour together.

See Also: #20: Beatlemania at Red Rocks

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Twenty fabled moments in Denver music, #20: Beatlemania at Red Rocks in 1964

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DesmoinesBroadcasting.Com

Over the course of the next few weeks, Backbeat will be counting down the twenty most fabled moments in Denver music history. The series kicks off today with a look back at the Beatles' legendary trip to the Mile High City in August 1964, and the pandemonium it created.

The Beatles did not just play gigs on their first American tour. Their 1964 tour was a cultural event with a capital C, the kind that jumps from the realm of pop music and into front-page headlines. The band's iconic appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show was just the beginning. What came next? A full U.S. tour, of course, which included a chaotic stay in Denver.

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