What Swallow Hill Music Is Looking For in its New CEO

Categories: Music News

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Courtesy of Swallow Hill
Tom Scharf spent seven years at the head of Swallow Hill.
Earlier this month. Swallow Hill Music announced that CEO and Executive Director Tom Scharf was resigning after seven years of running the Denver-based nonprofit organization that runs music education programs and organizes many concerts in the area. Scharf last day is September 30, and the organization is hoping to have someone else lined up before the end of the year.

See also: Swallow Hill CEO and Executive Director Tom Scharf Resigns

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OpenAir Live & Local Is a New TV Show Featuring Some of Colorado's Best Music

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Courtesy of cpr.org.
Nathaniel Rateliff performs on OpenAir Live & Local.
Beginning September 27, Colorado music lovers can get a listen and look at some of the state's best musicians as they come through Colorado Public Radio's OpenAir Studios via a new television show, OpenAir Live & Local. A collaboration with the team behind local television station CPT12's Sounds on 29th, this new Saturday night program has thirteen episodes loaded up and ready to go, featuring sets from the likes of Nathaniel Rateliff, Esme Patterson, You, Me & Apollo and more.

See also: Sounds on 29th's Heather Dalton talks Teletunes and Denver music TV history

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Viva Lyons Flood Relief Concert Will Feature Infamous Stringdusters, Hickenlooper on Banjo

Categories: Music News

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Governor Hickenlooper with The Infamous Stringdusters
Courtesy of Oskar Blues

Coloradoans will have the chance to watch Governor Hickenlooper play banjo with the Infamous Stringdusters, drink beer, and celebrate a year of rebuilding and volunteer efforts this Saturday at Viva Lyons, a fundraiser hosted by Oskar Blues.

The fundraiser and party, which is about more than just Hickenlooper showing off his banjo skills, is being held on September 13, which the governor's office has declared a state-wide day of service in recognition of last year's devastating floods.

See also: Nine months after Colorado's worst flood, the musicians of Lyons are ready for a comeback


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Fucked Up and the Futility of Defining Bands

Categories: Music News, Punk!

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Dustin Rabin
A lot can happen over the course of a decade. Even the punkest of punk bands aren't immune to the curve balls life can throw.

Toronto's Fucked Up definitely falls into the category of "punkest of punk." Since its inception in 2001 Fucked Up has done just about everything possible to build a wall between itself and the mainstream. The band's members go by fake names like 10,000 Marbles, Pink Eyes and Mustard Gas. They've made sometimes outrageous, sometimes just silly claims in interviews that no one in their right mind would believe.

And of course there's the issue of the band's name. But even a band with a moniker a lot of publications won't print has to grow up sometime. For Fucked Up, that evolution has made for some very interesting music.

See also: There's a New Punk Rock Record Store in Lakewood

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Jerry Kern Has Made a Lot of Noise With the CSO, But Can It Survive Discord With the City?

Categories: Music News

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As the brass quintet launched into a sweeping rendition of an old Hollywood score, camera crews captured the historic action. This was one of the Colorado Symphony Orchestra's controversial Classically Cannabis fundraisers, possibly the first-ever symphonic marijuana celebration anywhere -- even if the private event, held at the posh new Space Gallery on Santa Fe Drive, was for the most part unremarkable. There were no psychedelic numbers squeezed into the quintet's program of jazz and ragtime favorites, no noticeably pot-fueled shenanigans from the several hundred well-dressed attendees as they sipped wine and socialized.

Out on the gallery's open-air patio, though, patrons were free to smoke the marijuana they'd brought for the occasion -- and from the media's perspective, that was all that mattered. Reporters in attendance made note of the marijuana boutonnieres pinned to many of the guests' chests, the special green neckties the musicians wore for the occasion. Such details would end up in the New York Times, the Times of London, even on TMZ.

This was far from the first time the symphony had turned heads -- and it won't be the last.

See also: Colorado Symphony Orchestra's Pot Concert Begs the Question: Why Is This Still a Big Deal?

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Local Musician Kitty Vincent Opens Revolver, a Hair Salon With Sonic Appeal

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Kitty Vincent.
Last year when musician and hairstylist Kitty Vincent broke her foot in a car accident, she found herself confined to the house with idle hands. "I had six months in a cast to sit on the couch and sort of dream up all of these ideas, so I've had a lot of time to put this together in my head," says Vincent. The idea for her own hair salon -- one that blends the rock n' roll culture she's been a part of her whole life and the styling she's been doing for more than than a decade -- became a reality once she was mobile again. This coming weekend, Revolver: A Salon will come to fruition with an official grand opening celebration on East Colfax.

See also: Divorcees: It took breaking up to bring Le Divorce together

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American Gladiator Bandstand Will Determine the Hotel-Trashing King of Denver's Bands

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Flickr user ♫Ali
Event #3: "Hotel Trash and Smash"
In 2012, Thadeaous Mighell, Mitchell Pond and David Moke came up with the idea for an interactive arts festival after meeting at the now-defunct DIY space Unit E.

Soon after, Moke -- who organizes events for the Denver Theater District non-profit -- helped get the ball rolling and Blacktop was born. Although Blacktop is no more, the trio recently created something even more unique: American Gladiator Bandstand.

See also: Best New Music Festival 2013 -- Blacktop

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Record Store Chain Reaction Opens Today in Lakewood

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A Google street view from late 2012 of the building that now holds Chain Reaction Records.
Somewhere on West Colfax in Lakewood is a strip mall, virtually indistinguishable from all the others on any given stretch of the meandering 26-mile boulevard. The only thing that differentiates this particular strip mall -- for music fans, anyhow -- is that it is now the home of Chain Reaction Records, Denver's newest record store. Co-owners Josh Lent and Val Landrum have been nurturing their mutual dream of opening up a record store with a focus on punk and heavy metal for a long time, but it wasn't until recently that everything seemed to click.

"We'd been thinking about it for years, since like 2007," says Lent, "but it wasn't the right time. Our bands had been touring to California, and every single town there seemed to have its own punk record store, so why not Denver?"

See also: Jello Biafra on His Early Days in Punk in Colorado and His First Encounter with Wax Trax

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Chive Fest hopes to be among City Park's first major music festivals, despite concerns

Categories: Music News

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Flickr user mclcbooks
Keep Calm and...oh, you get the idea.
Photo-based entertainment website The Chive recently announced that it would hold a two-stage music festival called Chive Fest in City Park on August 16. The event will be among the first major admission-based, for-profit festivals held in Denver's largest park.

Some groups have expressed concern about the impact of Chive Fest, which will feature eight bands, including Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes and Talib Kweli. In response, the City of Denver asked Chive Fest organizers to host a public meeting to discuss those issues. They agreed and will hold that meeting this evening from 6 to 7 p.m in the VIP Room of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science.

See also: New music festival will bring Edward Sharpe, Talib Kweli and more to City Park

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Riot Fest denied a permit by Arapahoe County to host festival in Byers

Categories: Music News

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Aaron Thackeray
A band performs at last year's Riot Fest.
Riot Fest, which was scheduled take place this September in the small town of Byers, has been denied the temporary-use permit it would have needed to host the music festival and carnival as it had done last year. (This story has been updated below.)

Following a public hearing in which residents of Byers voiced their concerns with the three-day punk music festival's impact on the town, including safety, traffic and noise, Arapahoe County announced today that it won't grant the permit.

See also: Riot Fest returns to Denver September 19 to 21

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