Colorado Senator Chris Romer keeps pushing his Denver Cupcake Truck petition

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Colorado Senator Chris Romer, who's making a run for mayor now that Hick is the new guv, seems to be making cupcakes -- notably those from the Denver Cupcake Trucks -- one of his top priorities. Last week, we reported that Romer had splashed his official website with a plea to sign a petition...to save Clyde and Clementine, the two Denver Cupcake Trucks that were kicked off the road late last year because the owners of those trucks -- Sean and Denon Moore -- couldn't get a straight answer from the powers-that-be at the Department of Excise and Licenses, the same entity that first gave the Moores the license to rock-and-roll their cupcakes from a truck in the first place.

In any case, apparently Romer's petition hasn't amassed enough signatures to save the trucks, because I just opened my inbox to find a missive from the senator, which kindly asks me to forward it to five of my friends. Posting your letter on our blog should suffice, Senator.

Flip the page to read what Romer wrote.

As of today, my favorite cupcake truck has been scuttled and sent to the curb because Denver can't quite figure out what to do with the food truck phenomenon.

Don't let red tape shut down your favorite food truck. Forward this message to five friends and tell them to sign the petition before it's too late.

With cities competing for economic growth and jobs, we need a city government interested in working with businesses rather than throwing needless obstacles at them. As mayor, I will fight to reduce needless red tape.

The world is changing swiftly everyday, and business is transforming at an even faster pace. In this changing landscape, Denver must be competitive in delivering the types of jobs our citizens demand: we must become high performing, nimble, and thoughtful.

The fundamental problem for government is to figure out how to become more agile, how to keep up with our local small businesses.

What we see in the case of the cupcake truck is a small business trying to put people back to work, and you have two sides of city government saying yes and no.

The truth is, the city of Denver wasn't ready to think through how to deal with these innovations.

I want to be mayor to help think through ways in which our entrepreneurs and small business owners -- those who think outside the box -- can change the way we live and move and love our city.

Denver is in a position to move forward in ways that many other cities are not. But just as business is innovating in our communities, our government needs to strike a balance between sensible solutions and cultivating an environment of risk and opportunity.

If you haven't done so already, please tell your friends to sign our petition to save the Denver Cupcake Truck at www.RomerForMayor.com/CupcakeTruck.

I hope to move forward together, and to work towards a solution. Whose day isn't better with a cupcake?

Sincerely,

Chris Romer
www.RomerForMayor.com


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1 comments
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Has Chris Romer just become the "Mayor of Spam", the "Cupcake Mayor", or (yuck!) the "The Mayor of SPAM Cupcakes?" (shudder)

I have nothing against Mr. Romer, and I support his main point about small business, but is the Cupcake truck really what you want to hang your hat on?

By the way, what was the law or rule that the trucks apparantly violated which led them to be pulled from the streets? I understand that the initial questions weren't answered appropriately, but in the time since then, I still haven't heard any quotes of the law, either pro or con. Surely someone on Mr. Romer's staff did some investigation of the actual laws concerning the trucks.

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