Hey, servers! Win an EatDenver Dining Deck for your Denver Restaurant Week stories

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"Restaurant Week brings out the worst in people," lamented one chef this week, after a woman lambasted his menu for offering three courses rather than four. "What the fuck is this?" she shouted at her server, who was so stunned she broke into tears.

The restaurant -- one of Denver's best -- trumpeted a stellar board, one that proffered its entire menu, and, yet, that clearly wasn't good enough for this woman, who should have been promptly escorted to the exit, and tossed out on her ass. Instead, she stayed, ate and waltzed away with her nose in the air.

Bitch.

Denver Restaurant Week, or Denver Restaurant Half Month, as Jensen Cummings, chef de cuisine of TAG, calls it, is no easy, breezy two weeks. It's incredibly tiring and taxing on the staff, who work double shifts -- sometimes more -- to accommodate the infinite number of customers who jostle for reservations and space.

The fourteen-day food orgy officially came to an end last Friday, and we know how hard you -- the staff -- worked these last two weeks, so we want to reward your incredible hospitality by offering an EatDenver Dining Deck to at least one of you.

How do you win? Tell us, in the comment section below, your best (or worst) experience during DRW. We'll announce a winner at 5 p.m. on Friday.

Ready, set, spill.

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Ybarcewski
Ybarcewski

Mantonat - Do you ever do anything other than bitch!

Mantonat
Mantonat

Yes, I also disagree, counter, object, dispute, debate, contradict, and quibble. Occasionally, I concur.

By the way, questions usually end in question marks.

Brian Melton
Brian Melton

Alright...I'll bite. You probably knew I would eventually...

So the best part of Restaurant Half Month...us, the industry workers. The greatest gratuity that anyone can give us during this two-week sprint is the comraderie that not only happens between your fellow employees within the restaurant, but also with your peers working in all 303 restaurants participating in DRW.

It's the first Saturday of Restaurant Week. The kitchen has banded together to put out every dish that will be served during this two-week extravaganza. The servers have come from line-up with their game faces on, ready to start this never-ending ass kicking contest. We've hudled down, planned the lay-out of seatings that will never be adequate, juiced what will never be enough lime juice, polished all the glasses that will be washed, rinsed and re-polished an inumerable ammount of times, and straightened chairs that will seat nearly 300 people an evening (in our little space). When those doors open at 5 pm (or whenever) we watch in horror as the tables begin to fill. By 5:30, every table is cranking. The kitchen is being blasted, the bar is ankle deep in drinks. It's all we can do to hold ourselves together. But we do it...together.

It's a Monday night, which begins the second full week of DRW. You're tired to the point of delerium, laughing at your fellow bartender who has just stuck spout nipples onto his head. Then a couple sits down, orders a beer to split while they wait on their table. You both look at each other and burst out laughing for two reasons: 1) the nipples have left little circles on his head and he now looks like he has a skin disease and 2) who in the hell orders a beer by the bottle to split? When you read about the experience on Yelp the next day, the couple say that you were less than interested in conversation because they only bought one beer, which, they write, was WAY too expensive at $6. It was a Samurai from Great Divide and you split it? Really? I thought you were going to Yelp about my bar-buddies skin leasions.

It's a Wednesday afternoon before you head in to work for your 7th straight day. You read in the Westword that your friend's restaurant, OAK at Fourteenth has just burnt down. Suddenly working Restaurant Week becomes a pale memory as you pick up the phone to send him condolences. When you go out after work for that beloved beer and a shit of Jameson, the fire is all anyone can talk about. "Did you hear?" "It's so aweful!" "What are we going to do to help his staff out?"

These are only a handful of instances from my Restaurant Half Month. Little spans of time where you truley appreciate the people with whom you are working with. And yes, there are those times that we want to kill one another...but hey, that's being a part of a family in duress. But each year we make it thorough this ordeal, a little bit better at our jobs. And hopefully you had a pleasant meal, either with us or someone else. Just remember, we're out there working the other weeks of the year...come see us and experience what we do when we're not exhausted. It'll be worth it.

-B

Brian Melton
Brian Melton

I can't believe no one is bagging on me for writing a "shit of Jameson"...so here I go:

So when you say a shit of Jameson...is that like the next morning after a St. Patty's Day drinking binge? (A special shout out goes to the girl I saw drunkenly faceplant outside of Maloney's yesterday morning at 10:45 am! Bet your momma's proud.)

A "shit of Jameson?" I thought you used to be an editor for some magazine or something...that explains a lot.

A "shit of Jameson?" I take bigger shits of Jameson than you for breakfast!

My reply: "Guys! I was typing in a hurry! I'm super busy! I swear!"

Phew! Now, feel free to continue the discussion of $6 beer.

Mantonat
Mantonat

I appreciate all the hard work that restaurant employees and chefs put in during restaurant week, but $6 is too much for a Samurai. Maybe it is a local craft beer, but it's also a very light rice ale that's probably the cheapest beer for Great Divide to produce. I can usually get it for $8/six pack in liquor stores. Even most decent bars and restaurants don't charge more than $4 or $4.50 for a bottle. So if a couple wants to share a bottle while they wait for their table, who cares? Maybe they want to save room for all that tasty food. Maybe they're just not big drinkers. Maybe they are cheap, which is really nobody's business as long as they tip.Two things I don't do: 1) Yelp. 2) Go to restaurants during restaurant week. I'd much rather go and pay full price and get the restaurant, the food, and the staff at their best instead of putting up with crowds, whiny customers, and overstressed employees.

DrDrakeRemoray
DrDrakeRemoray

If you don't want to pay $6 for a beer, don't order it. For sure, don't order it and then complain about how much it cost. If you want to drink $4 beer, go to happy hour at some dive. AND if you are sitting in front of Brian, don't order a beer (or a vodka tonic), get a damn cocktail. Their loss I guess.

CircleLimit
CircleLimit

My wife and I just ate at TAG (3/10) for DRW and our server, Ebony, was friendly, professional, and attentive. Our reservation was a bit early yet Ebony was very engaging and accommodating, particularly when we asked what menu options were gluten free. Many servers tend to roll their eyes or have a lack of understanding when posed with this question. Our server was sympathetic but quickly moved to explaining how nearly every DRW menu option was available as GF, which was a testament to her knowledge and TAG's planning. Our entire experience was well worth it and we were very impressed by her service and the food.

Fletch Davis
Fletch Davis

Looks like they're all too tired, recovering from the insanity...

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