Gary Lee's will bring smoked meats, live jazz and a large patio to Broadway -- if it can win the liquor license fight

gary lee's.jpg
Gary Lee's Motor Club and Grub has hit a speed bump.
Gary Lee Bomar has been active in the Denver restaurant industry for 27 years, starting as a busboy and then working his way through most of the jobs in the businesses, putting in ten years at the Skylark and four years behind the bar at the Horseshoe Lounge.

But he's always dreamed of owning his own spot. So earlier this year, he picked up an old garage property on South Broadway, a block away from where he lives, and drew up plans for Gary Lee's Motor Club and Grub, a restaurant that would play on the historical use of the building for the decor, feature live jazz and serve dishes built around smoked meats and cheeses paired to drink specials and tap beer.

Bomar has hit a snag, though, and it seems to stem from some confusion about the concept: Worried that the new "motor club and grub" would attract a biker-bar crowd, a few members of the West Wash Park Neighborhood Association are doing what they can to make sure the eatery doesn't land its liquor license.

"It started with my initial plans to the city," Bomar explains. "The West Wash Park Neighborhood Association found out I had off-street motorcycle parking in those plans, and they took it and ran, assuming that I might attract a crowd that would have a negative impact on the neighborhood."

Since the opposition was raised, the restaurateur has been out canvassing the neighborhood -- which he's lived in for seventeen years -- and talking to his neighbors about his plans. "I've met with fourteen people who are opposed," he says. "But I've collected about 500 signatures from people who are excited about it."

Because what the would-be restaurateur actually has planned is far from a biker bar. Bomar wants to open what he calls a "first-class restaurant" -- manned by a young chef who's opened four restaurants and currently holds an executive-chef position at another Denver spot. "I'm trying to do something first-class with cuisine and entertainment," Bomar says. "And I'm trying to give something back to the community."

He wants his place to be a neighborhood spot where people can afford to come and eat, as he puts it, "more often than not." And he'd like to give neighbors an area where they can enjoy nice weather -- and listen to live music at the same time. "I'm planning to have a large patio on the Broadway side," he explains.

Patios are few and far between on that street, he points out, since most restaurants only have room for outdoor seating on a sidewalk. The deck will be flanked by ivy and bamboo and outfitted with fire pits, he adds, so that people can sit and enjoy live music, especially jazz, on the weekends. (Bomar says he's working with KUVO radio station on the programming.)

In the process, he'll breathe new life into the dilapidated building that's currently sitting, abandoned, on the overgrown lot.

Still, some neighbors are persistent, insisting that the block doesn't need another restaurant -- or the traffic that comes with it. Those willing to compromise want Bomar to sign a good neighbor-agreement, which he says he's more than happy to do as soon as they find common ground. "The first draft included a clause that would prevent me from getting a cabaret license for five years," he notes. But since his plans include live music, he's trying to renegotiate.

Bomar is optimistic that he'll be able to find an amicable solution with the association before his liquor license hearing scheduled for July 11 so that he can show the city the support he's drummed up with the residents. And he's also hoping to score the blessing of the Baker Historic Neighborhood Association when he meets with that group today -- and he'll need it, since his restaurant borders both districts.

And after that, he can get on with his dream and plans. "I want it to be beautiful," he says. "This is part of what makes our neighborhood great."

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Location Info

Gary Lee's Motor Club and Grub

176 S. Broadway, Denver, CO

Category: Music

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39 comments
Happy Neighbor to the East
Happy Neighbor to the East

Dear sporobolus, I read your posts.  You get it.  Well done and good luck.  You have one opportunity to fight a liquor license and, if you believe that the area does not need another liquor license, then you are doing what you believe to be best for your neighborhood.  The type of establishment or the person opening it is not relevant.  It's the needs and desires of the neighborhood for another hotel and restaurant liquor license.  If parking is a challenge, argue that the difficulty with parking reduces convenience for patrons and puts public safety at risk because patrons need to walk, sometimes several blocks to their car, late at night.  It's a problem.  Also, if current bars in the immediate area are not packed, then there is no need for another bar.  Period.  Keep your objectivity, don't let the personal attacks bother you.  People just decide that they want something and, if you get in the way of what they want, they act like spoiled children.  Their tactics worked in junior high school, but this needs to be a discussion for adults. 

I Drink Alone
I Drink Alone

I don't know I have to laugh at the youts.  They get real emotional if they think someone is taking their bottle away.  They play games in the park like we gave up when we were four.  Throwing a bean bag into a hole while sucking on a bottle?  They don't even play kickball anymore.  And they ride cruiser bikes like we used to deliver newspapers.

So when someone wants to open a new bar for them they call it a kid-friendly pizza restaurant.  Or a jazz club.  Not one of these youts listens to jazz.

 

BreeTalon
BreeTalon

Like most motorycle riders in Denver, I have the option when going out of what to drive or ride. High gas prices and limited parking (and the sheer joy of riding) often prompt me to take the bike or the scooter instead of the truck on warmer evenings. An establishment that offers motorcycle parking sounds inviting, and I would encourage my friends to think green, save gas and ride as well. Gary Lee's is also offering food and entertainment, something that appeals to those of us who are looking for more than drinks. Not every bar patron goes out to get "rowdy."Hey,@f2b7229c97a256a445d0ba7b22eac624:disqus :Why shouldn't you trust Gary Lee? In America we're given a chance to show our merit before being judged. In a crappy economy, I would think that residents would welcome new businesses in their neighborhood, and it sounds like most do. Gary Lee is a passionate and hard-working individual who intends to revitalize a dilapidated space and turn it into a viable business. I live in LoDo, and enjoy going out in the Baker neighborhood and on South Broadway. LoDo is loud and crazy, but I choose to live here because I enjoy the dynamic environment and proximity to shops and restaurants. In fact, those are the reasons I live in the city of Denver. Dealing with parking is, I agree, and issue. Exactly why, when I have the chance, I choose to ride and will spend my money at places that welcome me.

McC
McC

Best wishes Gary Lee. Keep up the good fight!

Sinklike
Sinklike

Gary is one of those guys that would give you the shirt off his back. He's an amazing artist and an all around great guy. I wish he was opening his place in my neighborhood! The transformation from old run down garage to juke joint will be epic!

Allison Housley
Allison Housley

When we opened up hi-dive & Sputnik over 7 years ago, nearly half of the commercial properties on South Broadway were vacant. A walk down the street could be a bit depressing, and while there were some established gems (Decade, The Hornet, Thrifty Stick, etc.), for much of the day the sidewalks were empty. Today, it's a vibrant neighborhood--we have more than one place to eat breakfast, we can buy craft supplies, clothing, dog food, shoes. We have so many more choices of where to eat or grab a drink. We can even take our kids to get an ice cream cone. Yes, liquor licenses to get transferred, but in a neighborhood like Broadway where as the hood improves the rents rise, that's almost always for the better. I don't miss The Shamrock--I'd rather go to the Irish Rover.

As for parking, it wasn't much of an issue when we opened because most of the time the street was so dead. Now it's alive and more people want to come here. Some of them drive but they also walk (a LOT of our regulars live close by), bike, and take cabs. On my to-do list is pleading with the city to install more bike racks along the block. A city bike-sharing station would be great too. Trashing yards isn't cool, but I hope that the annoyance of increased noise of bar patrons is somewhat offset by an increased in the vitality of a wonderful city neighborhood.I've known Gary for a good decade, and have no doubt that he'll run his place responsibly. Gary is not going to ruin the character of Broadway, West Wash Park, or Baker. Only a Ruby Tuesday, Cheesecake Factory, or Hard Rock Cafe could do that. 

sporobolus
sporobolus

some good points, though i was here then and i question "nearly-half"; Hi-Dive is one of the places that attracts the greatest proportion of patrons who don't drive, however Hi-Dive and it is still a factor in late night disturbances

as you seem to realize, though, it's the overall mix, not a thirtieth or a fortieth bar, that makes Broadway vibrant and adds value to the neighborhoods; and the neighborhoods add value to Broadway as well (their resurgence preceded Broadway's, and their foot-traffic helps sustain the businesses and temper the parking problem)

if Broadway doesn't keep its balance, it will fail in multiple ways; i would expect the existing business owners to understand that — more quality retail, more restaurants, more services, plus some parking and mass transit solutions would be the best way for Broadway to grow; a bike station would be great, especially if complemented by a bike lane and proper bike parking, plus some work to train the cyclists to stay off busy sidewalkshigher rents have caused a number of vacancies lately, and they increase the chance of chains coming in; i expect to see some liquor licenses transfered to chains or nightclub moguls in the next few years; if bars continue to proliferate, and/or if just one cabaret license turns into a real Christou-style nightclub, i also expect to see some of the criminal element move down from LoDoconcerns about this location are not about Gary Lee Bomar; if he can effectively address issues such as parking and noise i expect the neighborhood will welcome him; i hope to see more of the other businesses start addressing those issues as well

Spayurpets
Spayurpets

WWPNA is the poster child for ossified anti-business neighborhood organizations.  I am a resident and business owner on the West side and have had deals killed by that organization several times.  What Denverites don't quite understand is that neighborhood organizations like WWPNA are not democracies, and they do not often reflect the views of their residents.   They are self-appointed membership organizations made up of by the activists--those with pre-set agendas on unchecked power-trips. Dissenters who disagree with the leaders of the association simply go away after a while; why bother volunteering for an organization when you spend all your time trying to fight the entrenched leaders who are neither elected nor term-limited.   The two women atop the WWPNA structure have been there for years if not decades.  They make no secret of the fact that they are against any new liquor licenses in West Wash Park and neighboring areas, and anyone proposing to them a business that needs a liquor license has the burden of proving to them why they need it.  WWPNA is also unique in having a morality component at work also; I have found that some of the members of the WWPNA believe that alcohol promotes immoral behavior, and it is their duty to prohibit the devil juice.   Who would imagine that the City would delegate any authority over liquor licenses to a bunch of prohibitionists?   Parkies like me would love to have more restaurants and bars in the area, and I believe the vast majority of residents of Wash Park would agree, but the WWPNA lives in their own bizarre world, to the detriment of the rest of us.  The City would do well to start ignoring the views of these neighborhood associations when they so clearly do not reflect the desires of the community.

RGHOF53
RGHOF53

Very good point  -- the dissenting members of such organizations are weeded out or lose interest in attending meetings because they see that such organizations are not democratic at all. More like knitting circles for the idle-minded.

Wwwpna
Wwwpna

Amen! SpayUrPets............................

Winfieldshouse
Winfieldshouse

People are so quick to judge about things they have no knowledge about, Gary's place will be the nicest place on broadway with great food and great atmosphere.

non-alarmist
non-alarmist

This whole thing kind of reminds me of my forced-to-go-to-church days when the congregation was passing around a petition to prevent South Park from going on the air.  It was supposedly going to single-handedly trigger the end of morality in this country.

This just ain't that big a deal.  Frankly, I'm for anything that creates jobs in this town and isn't another frigging dispensary.  An eyesore of an abandoned building cannot possibly be better for this neighborhood than a classy eatery owned by one of Denver's most recognized service industry faces.

Diamomd Dave
Diamomd Dave

Biker-bar crowd?? If you've been to any of the biker bars in town lately, most are filled with 40 something professionals on carefully maintained $20,000 + motorcycles. These folks are far better behaved that the a lot of the younger people who party in Lodo. If Gary Lee attracts this "biker-bar crowd" I doubt most Wash Parkers would complain. 

Jamesbr1
Jamesbr1

I have spoken with Gary Lee about his plan and I am 100% behind it. There are plenty of people that would like to park their scooter, their 1948 BMW (me), or any other bike just to have some good food off Broadway. For people to stereotype bikers in this manner is like saying all Prius drivers are 50 year old Jewish mothers with environmental concerns, or that all minivan drivers have 4 children that all play soccer and a mom that is only concerned that her children are happy. Come on people! Diamond Dave is correct about the biker bar clientele these days. The only concern I have is that some people still believe that "Loud pipes save lives". What saves lives is a brain that is able to make sure that 16 year old that is texting in the car in front of me doesn't do anything stupider. All loud pipes do is annoy everyone around you. If the police would enforce the 96 decibel law that went into effect on July 1st, 2010, then things would be better for those of us that want to hear later in life and others that have to hear them ride by. 

cassandra
cassandra

Oh, I'm sure they'd find something to complain about. Doesn't take much to get the Wash Park folk into a good tizzy of white-ous indignation.

whatever
whatever

aren't most bikers white?  So there goes that argument. Plus, you really think this place - or any that have been having this issue -  is going to become the hangout for the minorities that live in Denver? 

Raudy
Raudy

The opposition to this establishment is mystifying. Especially considering it's an improvement on an ABANDONED BUILDING. Hmmm, an abandon building or a bar? Tough call (if you have no reasoning skills) Also, aren't Lincoln and Broadway second to only Colorado in terms of traffic and noise. If anything, we should be begging for more people to step up and improve depressed properties, not be provincial uptight goons.

Cheese Cole
Cheese Cole

I live in Wash park. This is sad all these people worrying about a new bar? Really? these are the same people that swear they are NOT alcoholics even while throwing out the 4 wine bottles consumed by the 2 people who live in that cute little bungalow in one night....EVERY night... get a life. Stop trying to fascist up the neighborhood any more than it already is. You like that kind of control? That's what we have Highlands Ranch for.

Wwwpna
Wwwpna

The WWPNA picks and chooses their battles.  They are the anti-Christ of small business.  Why they even have a say or any pull in the decision making process of a liquor license on Broadway is beyond me and many of my other neighbors.  I am an 11 year resident of West Washington Park and I have seen the WWPNA make small business owners waste loads of time and money and jump through unnecessary hoops and this time is no different.  All of you in opposition to any liquor license on Broadway that live within a few blocks.  When you do eventually end up selling your house make sure and cut checks to all of the small business owners that have increased your property values.  Maybe the Broadway Businesses should try and get a law passed that makes realtors selling houses within 10 blocks of Broadway have their potential buyers sign a waiver that states;  I acknowledge that more businesses, restaurants and bars will open on Broadway and in my neighborhood.  I also understand that periodically business owners will sell their businesses and ownership will change.  I understand that my property value could increase because of the small business owners in my neighborhood.  I recognize that run down real estate might get converted into something that has an allure and attracts consumers to Broadway.  I understand that there are other neighborhoods with bars and restaurants that have absolutely no parking yet there are new establishments opening up every day in some of those areas.  I understand that the WWPNA is not the voice of all the neighbors in Washington Park just a select few.  Good luck Gary Lee and any other future small business owners.  Myself and all of my other pro small business owner neighbors will help you however we can.  Oh and let’s not forget the renters that have a vote as well.  The same ones that come to wash park and baker because of the bars and restaurants.  Create a coalition of renters and have them help in the fight and give them a pro Broadway business card with discounts to all of the businesses they support.  It would be a huge eye opener to the neighborhood associations if renters started using their vote.  Make it happen Broadway.  See www.mycolfax.org for example.

Marvracing
Marvracing

Here! Here!  How would the WWPNA like it if their home sales were tied to a Good Neighbor Agreement?  Is that American? I lived in WWP for 12 years. Lincoln St properties were DUMPS. Broadway bars were DUMPS! The upturn of Broadway business increased the property values along Lincoln every bit or more-so than the people that invested/improved those homes.  WWPNA -- despite what you've done to your houses to improve the property values, you would still own undesirable properties if Broadway still had sleezy places like Kitty's, Cherry Pit, or The Shamrock.  Wake up! Business is good for your neighborhood.  

Spayurpets
Spayurpets

I totally agree on "Good Neighbor" agreements.  They are really "Gun to Your Head" agreements.   What the neighborhood associations like WWPNA hate the most is that they are deprived of their right to review transfers of liquor licenses by the City, so what do they do?  They force you to "agree" before you get your license that you will allow them to fully review any future transfer of the license.  When they can't get through the front door they get in by jimmying the back door.  If the City had any spine, they would make this kind of extortion illegal.   Plus, the Good Neighbor agreements (which WWPNA proudly states that they require of EVERY licensee) have all sorts of wish list items, demands, conditions regarding parking, lighting, noise reduction, closing hours, opening hours, litter, landscaping etc.  What does any of that have to do with liquor??!!   They might as well make it simple and require every licensee to fork over $10,000 to the WWPNA.    At least it would be transparent to everyone what the WWPNA is doing to business in Denver.  

David
David

How about offering up an olive branch?  Get rid of the motorcycle parking and sponsor a b-cycle station on south broadway.  This would be a good way to generate both business and goodwill given how traffic and parking seem to be the major issue.

Jamesbr1
Jamesbr1

By providing motorcycle parking, you are allowing bikers/scooter riders to take up a small space instead of a full car parking space. It is a viable plan and Gary should not have to alter his plans. Yes, I ride a bike and will dine there. Having motorcycle parking does NOT mean gangs. If people are concerned about the loudness of the bike's pipes... they should contact the police for the decibel levels. I would welcome that with open arms - people that take the baffles out are tools and one step away from people that wear TapOut shirts!

Carly
Carly

Isn't this neighborhood technically "Speer", not West Wash Park?  West Wash Park's boundary begins at Alameda and goes south.  I'm not sure what WWPNA's stake is in this, unless they're a watchdog for bordering neighborhoods as well.

I lived in the Speer neighborhood last year and parking was always pretty ample.  The only noise was the college aged stoners in our building.  Now I live in a quieter "transitioning" neighborhood close to two churches which, oddly enough, bring in more traffic/noise/litter than Broadway bars ever did.  Maybe we should start limiting the number of churches in a neighborhood?

sporobolus
sporobolus

Speer is a political boundary established years ago by the city; Registered Neighborhood Organizations like WWPNA determine their own boundaries and there are many overlaps between RNOs; WWPNA and BHNA (Baker) are the most active RNOs covering the Gary Lee's location; you can explore it on denvermaps: http://bit.ly/cyIKKL

Relax
Relax

So what does BHNA say about it, b/c they have just as much of a stake in this as the WWPNA does....

sporobolus
sporobolus

afaik BHNA hasn't taken a position yet; its Board of Directors meets tonight at 5:30 p.m. in the Hirschfeld Towers community room, 333 W. Ellsworth

Owen
Owen

I live in this neighborhood and I'm for this establishment. It's occasionally good to have a watchdog like WWPNA, but often times they want the neighborhood to be some Leave It To Beaver American fantasy. This neighborhood has never been that in the many years I've lived there. In fact, it's a much better than that: a nuanced, diverse, and growing neighborhood. The more restaurants the better! 

Relax
Relax

Its South Broadway!  Not Washington between Dakota and Washington. You people in Wash Park really need to relax, first the pizza joint now this. Oh no, someone wants to take a nasty old building and turn it in to a great place to eat and see some Jazz...OH THE HORROR!!!!   I've never heard of anyone sobering up by destroying property of finding random pieces of trash to throw around...but if that really works please let me know.

bewilderbeast
bewilderbeast

If I didn't want to live near a bar/nightclub/restaurant, I would move to the suburbs, come on people, if you are going to live anywhere near downtown or major street in Denver or any other city, quit crying if bars/restaurants come and go, it is just the way things go. I hate it when people cry about how their neighborhoods will be destroyed once a bar moves in, think about all the people who could walk to the bar and not drive home after. Good luck Gary Lee and look forward to the new place. 

sporobolus
sporobolus

i think there's a misunderstanding here about my comment – i live west of Broadway, in walking distance to over 50 bars & restaurants; overall, like most of my neighbors, i enjoy thiswhen it comes to bars, though, there's a limit to what the surrounding neighborhoods can sustain when the vast majority of the patrons still drive; get them out of their cars and you'd solve 90% of the problems, but without cars there's not enough mass transit nor enough nearby residents for half the joints on Broadway to make a profit, so there's a built-in relationship between more bars and more carssome have cast this as poor little Gary Lee Bomar just wants to make a quiet little jazz club with gourmet food and everyone will walk to it, while some in West Wash Park are sending around emails about a hard-core biker bar going in; the reality is somewhere in between, but Broadway *is* saturated, and most of Gary Lee's customers *will* driveso we have a situation which is out of balance, and the question is how to solve it; here are some possible solutions:1) parking restrictions; these depend on the city's ability to enforce them, and they inconvenience some neighbors too2) bars contracting with parking lots and valets; there is some hope for this but i don't think it will happen until parking restrictions add some pressure3) good neighbor agreements with new (and existing) bars; odds are stacked against neighborhoods on these5) street cars on Broadway6) somehow re-educate the selfish minority of drivers that cause the worst problems7) your ideas ... (something more constructive than "move to the suburbs" please)

Mantonat
Mantonat

So it's not the liquor license, it's the parking that's the main issue. But by opposing the liquor license, you effectively put off dealing with future parking issues. I get it, a bar & grill has more patrons at any one time than a knitting shop or a dialysis clinic, so they will only add to the parking problem.

Did anyone oppose Sweet Action when it went in? That place is always packed, there are people loitering on the sidewalk, small children lining up for icecream are within dangerous proximity to a busy street, and the generally small serving size for ice cream means that there will be alot more people coming and going than a full service restaurant, where people tend to stay put for a little longer. These neighborhood ice cream shops are, in fact, a nuicance all around the city. Since there are so few of them and since the quality of the product is very high, they are a traffic and noise nuisance in general. Have you ever tried to sit on your front porch to quietly read the paper across the street from Bonnie Brae or Little Man and you can't even concentrate on the crossword puzzle because of the constant squawking of children, the revving and exhaust of car engines, and the rude honking and jockeying of motorists trying to claim a spot on a busy street? And this goes on all day on the weekends, all evening throughout the summer, and well into the night hours at some of these shops that stay open late to accomodate late diners. And god forbid that the Harley riders should ever show up wanting ice cream.

David
David

actually hell's angels bikers would probably fit in better on s. broadway than a bunch of investment bankers.  i don't think neighbors are worried about sketchy characters (already plenty of those around and we get along fine).  the concern should be groups of muffler-deficient motorcycles gunning down broadway.  speeding traffic is already deafening with commuters driving south.  the last thing we need are over-compensating bankers and their speed-machines.

cassandra
cassandra

Lest we forget that a fairly large percentage of Harley riders these days are dentists and investment bankers, and similar forms of riff raff. Most folks who can afford a $30k motorycycle aren't exactly what one would describe as the "criminal element" anymore.

sporobolus
sporobolus

the essence of the problem here is that business owners want to cash in on South Broadway's popularity, but there are few ways balance this understandable gold rush with the needs of the surrounding neighborhoods

regardless of whether Gary Lee's is going to be a biker bar we have several problems starting with cars -- most patrons are in cars, and with the clampdown on informal nighttime use of large empty parking lots along Broadway, the cars wind up one or two blocks off Broadway, often in illegal spots (the city can't be bothered to write tickets on weekend nights)

patrons spill out of bars at 2 a.m. in a rowdy mood -- often so drunk they can't find their vehicles; they wake the neighbors, damage property and toss trash while attempting to sober up a little before driving back to the 'burbs; at this hour, cops are too busy with serious crimes to even notice this problem; bar owners will never take responsibility for the behavior of their patrons, and they will never pay to provide parking, so there is an impasse; the liquor licensing process is one of the few places where neighbors can get a toehold, but still the odds are in favor of the bars, so they won't negotiate

and why should we trust Gary Lee? bar owners have historically made false claims to pacify the neighborhoods (Barry's owner said his bar would be a place you'd feel comfortable bringing your whole family!); plus if we look past the current boom to when some of these new bars have failed, handing their licenses to new, bottom-feeding owners in a transfer process that is essentially a rubber stamp, we see why neighbors might oppose any new bar, especially one with a dance cabaret license

DenverScener
DenverScener

Gary Lee is a class act. and you Mr.Sporobolus are a class A Dooche! Move to Highlands Ranch

Mantonat
Mantonat

Anyone who owns a home within a half mile of this strip of South Broadway should know exactly what it's all about. This strip has been a focal point for adult stores, head shops, dive bars, second-hand clothing stores, etc. for years and years. One liquor license is not going to change things for better or worse. It's a colorful stretch of urban life; let's not confuse it with pristine neighborhoods like (cough) old South Gaylord.

sporobolus
sporobolus

get real -- head shops, second hand stores & adult stores might cause "perception problems", but they make minimal demands on the surrounding neighborhood; in terms of actual physical impacts nothing beats adding 18 liquor licenses between First and Alameda in the last ten yearsyou're right, it's not one liquor license; it's the cumulative impact of a trend; Broadway at the moment is a very exciting hip place, but the surrounding area is in effect subsidizing this fun

Mantonat
Mantonat

You get real, or keep it real, or whatever you mean by that.

I guess what you are saying is that you don't want to live in a neighborhood with Sketch, El Diablo, the Hornet, Sobo 151, Sputnik, Go Fish, the Walnut, McClaughlin's, Deluxe, Delite, Michelangelo's, Spicy Basil, Karma, etc. These are all fine establishments that offer great and varied food in a pedestrian-friendly area with easy access to public transportation. Yes, there are a couple of bad apples in the lot (like the Barry's that you mentioned), but I used to be able to walk to all of these places and now live in a different neighborhood - and I often miss having easy access to good live music, food, and excellent shops like Fancy Tiger and Decade.

Far from a neighborhood that is "subsidizing the fun" of South Broadway, the Baker neighborhood (which was unsafe to walk in after dark within recent memory) to the west and what I'll call "West West Wash Park" to the east have been revitalized in recent years and have lower crime, more families, and nicer looking lawns and homes than ever before. The influx of new businesses and new money into the area is nothing but a plus for the neighborhood. Any disturbances caused by the drunk or rowdy should be dealt with by the police, not by the nanny state making laws to prohibit the free exercise of commerce in an area once blighted by excessive crime, homelessness, and gang activity.

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