Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: Peach crème brûlée

Peachesbarb.jpg
Barb Macfarlane
Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with the big, new kitchen. They often bring some of their market's choicest ingredients home with them and cook up a feast.

Guess what arrived at Marczyk's today? Ela Family Farms peaches, which, according to Barb, are the best Colorado-grown peaches in the state. "This batch is not freestone, which means the pit comes away from the flesh easily," says Barb, adding that "Freestones make for prettier slices." Make sure you buy ripe peaches, she stresses. "When you push down on the top of the peach -- do it gently -- it should give a little. Don't squeeze it all over, because that just wrecks it."

"I wanted to do a peach crème brûlée, because I love peaches with that burnt-sugar taste" says Barb, who also includes an easy recipe for crème Anglaise from Allrecipes.com.

For the peaches

5 ripe peaches
3/4 cup white sugar
2 teaspoons butter

Directions

1. Slice the peaches fairly thick, and arrange in concentric circles in a round pan (not glass) that can withstand the heat under the broiler.
2. Sprinkle the peaches evenly with sugar, and broil the fruit until it starts to brown at the edges and the sugar starts to form a crust.
3. Remove the peaches and let them cool to room temperature.

For the crème Anglaise

1 cup heavy cream
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 egg yolks
1/3 cup white sugar

Directions

1. In a small, heavy saucepan, heat cream and vanilla until bubbles form at the edges. Do not boil.
2. While cream is heating, whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until the mixture is smooth. Slowly pour 1/2 cup of the hot cream mixture into the egg yolks, whisking constantly.
3. Gradually add egg yolk mixture back to remaining cream mixture, whisking constantly. 4. Continue to cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture coats the back of a spoon. Remove the pan from the heat, and continue to stir gently until the mixture slightly cools.
5. Drizzle crème Anglaise over the peaches and serve.

For more from Pete, Barbara and Marczyk Fine Foods, visit the market website. And be sure to check out Pete's blog.

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5 comments
Barbara
Barbara

Thank you Jeff. I was just messing around in the kitchen and thought of this, and took massive liberties in naming it. I like your name, and true to French cuisine, it's a nice long name with lots of accents. Do the French have fresh peaches like in the States?

Uncledave8
Uncledave8

I make a lot of Pete and Barbara's recipes and like them but call me a purist - to call this a peach creme brulee - no way.  Pouring some custard over peaches does not a creme brulee make.  Doesn't make it a bad idea but they're taking serious liberties with culinary terms here.

Mantonat
Mantonat

You're the Comicbook Man of home cooking. Worst. Dessert Name. Ever.

Jeff
Jeff

 The peaches are brûléed though, so it's really a deconstructed crème brûlée.  I suppose you could call it pêches brûlées avec de la crème Anglaise if you really want to.

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