Five reasons why Papa John's should raise the dough for employee health care

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Papa John's CEO John Schnatter has been outspoken about cutting employee hours to less than thirty hours per week so that he doesn't have to pay their health insurance costs -- as mandated Affordable Health Care Act -- or Obamacare; he has cited concerns over the estimated $5 to 8 million dollar annual cost to the company.

Is Schnatter an oppressed business owner being crushed under the boot of government regulation or is he just a douchepickle who doesn't give a fuck about his employees and now has a convenient excuse to blame someone else for it? Here's our list of five reasons why Papa John's should raise the dough for employee health care -- no delivery charge.

See also:
- Peyton Manning wants a slice of the pie -- Papa John's, that is
- Medical marijuana: Papa John's delivery driver calls cops on legal patient over weed
- Papa John's gets a pizza the DNC action

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5. Because giving employees health coverage is more generous than giving away free pizzas

There is a fine line between appearing to be magnanimous, and actually being generous. Schnatter is constantly on the tube giving away free pizzas to the dining public like an affluent lord of the manor spreading largesse to his humble serfs. He's given away millions of pies for the NFL season, the Super Bowl, for customer rewards programs, contests, store openings and even for fellow douchemobile Camaro owners, who got free pizzas just for owning Camaros. So, here's a simple solution on how to pay for employee health care benefits: Stop giving away so many damn pizzas. Use the revenue freed up from cutting the marketing budget back so sick employees can go to the doctor instead of dripping mucus into the mozzarella.

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4. Because employees have long memories

In this still-slow economy, many employers -- especially the low-wage ones like Papa John's -- have employees by the curlies because a shitty job is still better than no job. And while his employees are worrying about paying for milk, gas and rent -- while working exactly 29 hours per week -- Schnatter is kicking it in a 40,000 square-foot mansion, swimming in one of his several pools, putting around on his private golf course or choosing which of his cars to drive. We're not saying that his hard work and business acumen shouldn't be rewarded, but he didn't "build that" all by his lonesome. There are CEOs who have taken pay cuts rather than dick over their employees, so when the economy picks up, Schnatter's decent, hardworking employees -- the ones who helped pad his purse -- may hit the pavement and land at competing companies that will pay for their health insurance.

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3. Because customers have long memories

Customers who want pizza have options, and Papa John's is still in third place among the top-selling pizza chains, behind Pizza Hut and Domino's. And since there are people out there who make political decision when ordering food -- voting with their wallets and all -- maybe being the loudest voice in the media negating affordable health care for employees isn't doing your business any favors. Perhaps adding a few cents, or even a dollar, to the price of each pizza in order to give employees access to preventative care, medicine and treatment for illnesses and injuries won't seem like an unfair trade-off to everyone. Since when does not being an asshole hurt public perception?



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16 comments
mturner1004
mturner1004

I love Papa John's pizza, business cost are factored in for every business that is created. The RISK of money in and out of the day to day operations of running that business. A business has to make a profit, or there is no sense in the owners taking the risk of losing the money to GIVE people jobs. The pizza business is competitive and you have to stay in the competitive range of pricing, or you lose customers and go out of business. If there were no RISKS in owning a business, everyone would have one. More people prefer to NOT take the risks of their money, time, etc,  So they DON'T have a business and prefer to work FOR someone in a job they like and go home. They do not  have to worry about anything concerning the business (long hours, money they don't have, that was borrowed to start the business and has to be paid back, headache of employees not showing up for work, etc, etc) . Customer loyalty programs, giving me a free pizza, keeps me coming back to Papa Johns- this helps the middle class (me) to be albe to buy the Pizza, and the choice of buying from them again, when I can afford to eat out the next time. 

MamaPink
MamaPink

Wow, so sad, more bashing of the republicans. When are the rude comments going to stop? Guess it is time to stop reading the Cafe Society columns -particularly from this author.

tedomatic
tedomatic

This is why the people who create regulation and taxes work in either media or the public sector: because they don't understand that a 5 million dollar hit to a business is huge. They don't realize that the main purpose of a business is to create profit.

Jennisadipsh1t
Jennisadipsh1t

Once again Jenn proves how clueless she is about business.  Well done queen of the dipsh*ts.

ScubaSteve
ScubaSteve topcommenter

Schnatter needs the $$$ to pay Peyton Manning to be his spokesface.

turtleposer
turtleposer

 @mturner1004 I actually dated an entrepreneur.  His specialty is start-ups which he runs for about 5-10 years then sells.  He was an extreme liberal.  I asked how he felt about taxes and employee benefits. While he was obviously concerned about costs, he'd still take the risk and create a new business.  He's created several and is quite wealthy, though not as wealthy, but has lost everything a couple times, but not because of his employees, but because his idea wasn't a good one.  This man blamed himself, not others for his success or failure.

 

Schnatter is not a true risk-taker, but someone who wants to conserve his money.  Maybe at one time he was, but really, a man who has a castle and a moat is no longer someone who's going to be out on the streets if he took a risk.

ScubaSteve
ScubaSteve topcommenter

 @mturner1004

 

What the hell are you babbling about?  Your babble has absolutely nothing to do with cutting employees hours to avoid paying health care benefits. 

jenna-furrr
jenna-furrr topcommenter

 @mturner1004 And it's possible that you will end up getting a hot, delicious pie that was hacked on by some poor, sick employee who can't afford a doctor visit. I say go the extra mile with ordering--or getting your free pizza--and ask for extra phlegmy sneeze juice on top.

hazelrah
hazelrah

i don't really understand what you're trying to say. nobody is advocating for papa john's or the franchisees to not make money. nobody is saying that there isn't risk involved in owning a business. nobody is saying that customer loyalty programs are a bad idea. what IS being said is that IF maybe they cut back on the free pizzas they give out just a teeny bit, they could probably afford to give their employees health care. as for me, i'd say it's not a big deal if their pizza goes up by 14 cents. i'd gladly pay 14 cents a pizza if it means people who work long hours for not great pay get health care. 

mturner1004
mturner1004

 @tedomatic a quote from Gandhi: “Truth is by nature self-evident. As soon as you remove the cobwebs of ignorance that surround it, it shines clear.”

People don't take the risk of being in business, not to make a profit, they close down, as Hostess just has, they don't need the hassle. That's why most of the people who are ranting, will never own a business, they don't know how, don't have the money, or don't want the hassle, and regulations that go with it.

jenna-furrr
jenna-furrr topcommenter

 @Jennisadipsh1t Can I be princess of the dipshits? I've always wanted to be a princess of something. And I bet the tiara for this title will be pretty neat looking.

hazelrah
hazelrah

 @Jennisadipsh1t care to elaborate, or did you just pettily create an account insulting the writer to say basically nothing? you're kind of a waste of space.

turtleposer
turtleposer

 @mturner1004  @tedomatic  The people you describe are not risk-takers, but people who give up way too easy.  Remember, Hostess is not a start-up, but run by CEOs who basically get a business handed to them.

 

Besides, Hostess is competing with better tasting products.  Perhaps rather than blaming the employees, the CEOs should've come up with better products rather than riding the coattails of someone else's success.

tedomatic
tedomatic

 @turtleposer  @mturner1004 That is a great point. Hostess has been using the same business model for the last 40 years. They were due to go under. And like you pointed out in another post, entrepreneurship is not owned by conservatives. It is about taking a risk, believing that your idea can be monetized, and jumping in.

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