Reader: Jenn Wohletz's "premeditated hate" for Guy Fieri is no laughing matter

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Jenn Wohletz doesn't like Guy Fieri. She's been an anti-fan since the late '90s, and recently served up "Five reasons why Guy Fieri should drive to Douchebagistan and never come back."

And responses to her piece keep coming. Some positive, some definitely not...

See also
- Five reasons why Guy Fieri should drive to Douchebagistan and never come back
- Jason Sheehan: Guy Fieri brings the circus to town
- Reader: Guy Fieri is such an irritating douche that he seems to be mocking douches

Says Ekaterina:

I am surprised that you chose to print such a negative, and "holier than thou" piece. The tone is so full of premeditated hate. Is this really the standard we have set for journalism? All aspects of this article bring to light the age of inauthentic digital persona. Unless Jenn really wants us to believe she was the the popular bitch from 8th grade, the cruel insensitive bullying and crude angle is so hypocritical. Is it a big laugh she wants from us? No one's chuckling over here.

Last chance -- for now -- to tell us how you feel about Guy Fieri. And Jenn Wohletz's piece on him, for that matter.



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10 comments
epll
epll

The piece made no sense.  Fieri wasn't on Food Network until 2006 and, before that, was a small time restauranteur in Sonoma County.  How, then, did Ms. Wohletz begin hating Guy Fieri in the 90s?  Is she such a super-hipster that her disdain pre-dated his place in pop culture by a decade? 

Denver Dave
Denver Dave topcommenter

I actually like DDD but the show he had "Guy's Big Bite" where he was cooking was just painful to watch.  He was totally over the top trying to be super macho (no girly chef here) even though he wears more jewelry than Liberace.  He obviously is totally comfortable in his on-screen persona and I'm sure has the hide of a rhinoceros.  I doubt Jenn hurt his wittle feelings.

AceRanchero
AceRanchero

Ace appreciated what Guy Fieri was doing when he first rolled out his "DDD" show—my dream job if there ever was one (though I would have preferred a Mustang convertible)—on the heels of winning "The Next Network Food Star," but perhaps his over-the-top personality, catch phrases, reality shows and overall schtick have simply become wearying by sheer exposure, making the Times Square restaurant stumble an all too easy target upon which to pounce and vent for pent-up misgivings. 

Besides, it's not as though the Food Network is populated by a bunch of sweet-dispositioned milquetoasts. From the bulling Bobby Flay, who will "surprise" you with a visit whereby he thinks he can cook your specialty dish better than you can ("Throwdown with Bobby Flay," my favorite episode being the one where the Donut Plant's Mark Isreal is clearly pissed-off for the entire episode) to Paula Dean, who was actually trying to kill us all with both saccharine Southern charm and creative cholesterol delivery systems, these folks are selected and promoted by the Food Network to fulfill individual brands as well as to, collectively, establish the brand of the overall enterprise. That Mr. Fieri was picked to be the punky-Cali buy is, to me, rather brilliant. 

ScubaSteve
ScubaSteve topcommenter

Fieri isn't a chef and doesn't profess to be one. He has a degree from UNLV in hospitality management. The Food Network television channel has a reality show/competition entitled "Who Wants To Be the Next Food Network Star?" The competition is open to anyone. You don't have to be a chef to enter. He won first place and part of the prize was a six-episode program on the Food Network channel. This lead to more shows and all that crap.

Mantonat
Mantonat topcommenter

@epll So it's not possible that Jenn is either from or at least visited Santa Rosa in the late 1990s? And if that's the case, wouldn't it be just as easy to have hated Johnny Garlic's in 1998 as 2012?

Mantonat
Mantonat topcommenter

@steveville I checked Jenn's original article and I did not see her use the word chef to describe Fieri. The tag "celebrity chef" appears at the bottom of the article, but those tags are probably not selected by the blog writer. It's somewhat of a moot point though, since he owns multiple restaurants and had his own cooking show. He also had to win the Food Network show based on his cooking as well as his camera presence. He may not have gone to cooking school, but he does cook professionally, at least part of the time.

epll
epll

@Mantonat Of course it's possible (I did live in Santa Rosa during Fieri's pre-FN period, although he wasn't well known; his restaurants were somewhat well known, but he wasn't a local celeb by any means).  But, if that's the case, it should've been included in the article.  Why?  Because without such an explanation, someone like me will read that Ms. Wohletz has hated Guy since the 90s and immediately discredit the rest of the column since the first sentence has what appears to be an inaccuracy.  It's lazy writing either way.

Mantonat
Mantonat topcommenter

@epll @Mantonat I don't think it's either deep or sophisticated to make a joke stating "I hated so-an-so way back when!" It's just either funny or it's not, and I'm not making any claims one way or another. I'm just saying that even if it's not funny, it still makes sense on some level, either literal or comedic. What doesn't make much sense is that either of us is spending time critiquing a comment of a comment of a blog post. But then, I was posting comments to Westword in the late 90s! Where were you?

epll
epll

@Mantonat I was waiting for the defense of this post on literary grounds.  Because Cafe Society is so deep...  Even if that's the case, the post fails.  Consider that Ms. Wohletz doubled-down on the inaccurate 90s claim by stating that she understands why Guy was popular in the 90s, followed by a list of things that actually were popular in the 90s.  Given that Guy Fieri was unequivocally not popular in the 90s, 1/5 of the post is based on her false chronology.  That's not exaggeration for "comic effect;" it's saying something that's not true.  If Cafe Society were truly as deep or sophisticated as your explanation suggests, it wouldn't have to be so heavy handed in its humor.

Mantonat
Mantonat topcommenter

@epll @Mantonat It's also entirely possible that she was exaggerating for comic effect. Again, maybe not your idea of funny, but certainly not out of the realm of standard sarcastic humor.

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