Trends without end, round three: Vegetables, spice and Scandinavia

Hugo Matheson, chef/co-founder, the Kitchen family of restaurants
On life without meat: I see vegetables as definitely moving forward. At some point, our culture is going to have to eat less meat; otherwise, I don't know how we can go on producing such inefficient food. Some people think you can't eat a meal without meat, but we need to find a better balance between vegetables and meat. The cultural challenge is how do we make it so that meat isn't the most important food on the plate?

Tim Wanner, wine director, the Kitchen family of restaurants
On California rising: This will be the year that California reemerges as an authentic wine region, which is championed by the many up-and-coming passionate young winemakers who understand that wine's place on the table is not as a starring role but as a complement to the food. They are driven not by scores, but by a quest to understand and develop an appreciation for what California wine is. I also predict that the twenty-page, leather-bound, encyclopedic wine list will give way to smaller, more focused lists.

Stefan Beck, beer director, The Kitchen [Upstairs]
On beer education: Something I'd like to see in the next few years is better education for beer servers. Restaurants and bars will need to take the basic steps to educate their staff on beer styles, history and service. Pouring beer in clean, appropriate glassware, as well as being able to describe a given beer style, are going to be essential in this burgeoning beer paradise. I think, too, that we're going to continue to see a trend of specialization, both in Colorado's beer scene and nationally. Breweries that focus on barrel-aged beers or beer styles from a specific region or tradition will keep popping up and garnering attention.

Watch for another installment in "Trends Without End" on Cafe Society.



Location Info

Venue

Map

Panzano

909 17th St., Denver, CO

Category: Restaurant

Savory Spice Shop

1537 Platte St., Denver, CO

Category: General

My Voice Nation Help
2 comments
jenna-furrr
jenna-furrr

Asafoetida or hing powder has been one of my delicious, dirty little secrets for years. Sure, it smells like rotten garlic and onions, but it adds a subtle layer of flavor to vegetable and potato dishes, and gives my vegetable soups that certain something.

Mantonat
Mantonat topcommenter

One of the common themes when it comes to restaurant trends is how to take something cheap and sell it to customers at a premium. If you can sell a bowl of collard greens for $8, there's probably more of a profit margin than selling expensive cuts of meat. Customers get excited about ordering a variety of relatively inexpensive items, especially if the flavors seem exotic through the use of minimal and select amounts of unique spices or other ingredients. Despite the abundance of fresh produce during the summer, restaurateurs probably secretly love winter because they can feature really inexpensive stuff like root vegetables and braised "off-cuts." 

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...