Recipe Wednesday: Gnocchi with tomato sauce and porcini mushrooms

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Whitney Ariss

Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with a spacious kitchen. They often bring some of their market's best ingredients home with them and cook up a feast, and when they're not cooking at home, they're working with the staff at Marczyk to create recipes for the rest of us to enjoy, usually turning to Whitney Ariss, a home cook and the market's marketing project manager and events coordinator, for inspiration.

"So these two Italians sat down to dinner...and start talking tomato sauce -- at least that's something that we like to imagine a lot of Italian families talking about," says Ariss. "Tomato sauce, after all, is all-important and something that every pasta-loving Italian cook has in their repertoire," plus, adds Ariss, "so many all-important things are discussed amidst heaping piles of spaghetti with tomato sauce."

Enter Nicola Peduzzi, matriarch of the Peduzzi family, who owns and runs Rustichella D'Abruzzo, and Rolando Beramendi, the founder of Manicaretti Italian food importers. "Destined to be a match made in heaven, Rolando fell in love with the purposeful simplicity of Nicola's cooking, and what started as a way for their family to utilize their own stone-ground wholewheat flour to make rustic, wholewheat pasta evolved into a thriving business dedicated to sourcing the best Italian ingredients, often from their own family farm, to make the best artisanal Italian sauces and pastas, Ariss explains. "Their tomato sauce is uncomplicated, well balanced and crazy-delicious." And it's the inspiration for today's recipe: gnocchi with tomato-porcini sauce.

"We bought the tomato sauce in bulk and got a great deal on it, and we're very excited to pass that deal along to our customers by offering these delicious sauces at a great price," says Ariss, adding while the tomato sauce "tastes wonderful on its own, add a little butter, cream, and foraged porcini mushrooms -- we get ours from Hunt & Gather -- and you've got something really special and delicious."

See also: Recipe Wednesday: bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin with candy cap mushrooms

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In the kitchen with Comida chef Martin Campos: tequila-cured salmon ceviche tostada

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Martin Campos

In this week's Chef and Tell interview, Martin Campos, exec chef of Comida at the Source, admits that while he was a picky eater as a kid, a seafood feast in Oregon -- his first food epiphany -- paved the way for a future in cooking. The chef is still obsessed with seafood and fish, including salmon ceviche, the recipe of which he shares on the following page. "The size of the salmon you have will dictate how long it takes to cure, but count on twelve hours of curing for every pound of salmon, and write down the date and time that you started the curing process so you can be as accurate as possible," advises Campos.

See also: Martin Campos, exec chef of Comida at the Source: "Nothing is wrong with a nice round plate"


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Recipe Wednesday: bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin with candy cap mushrooms

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Whitney Ariss

Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with a spacious kitchen. They often bring some of their market's best ingredients home with them and cook up a feast, and when they're not cooking at home, they're working with the staff at Marczyk to create recipes for the rest of us to enjoy, usually turning to Whitney Ariss, a home cook and the market's marketing project manager and events coordinator, for inspiration.

"Our produce guru at Marczyk's, Roger Burleigh, has been carefully curating an intriguing mix of items from a great local purveyor called Hunt & Gather, and the candy cap mushrooms are our latest addition, not to mention my favorite new ingredient in our stores right now," says Ariss.

And the name, she insists, is no joke: "These mushrooms, which are foraged in the Pacific Northwest and immediately dried to preserve and intensity their mildly earthy and candy-like flavor, are actually sweet," she says, adding that the mushrooms "release a fragrance that's so much like maple syrup." In fact, claims Ariss, your kitchen will smell like pancakes for days. "It's actually awesome, and if they weren't so delicious, I might consider using them as potpourri."

See also: Recipe Wednesday: oven-baked bacon-and-kale chips


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Recipe Wednesday: oven-baked bacon-and-kale chips

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Whitney Ariss
Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with a spacious kitchen. They often bring some of their market's best ingredients home with them and cook up a feast, and when they're not cooking at home, they're working with the staff at Marczyk to create recipes for the rest of us to enjoy, usually turning to Whitney Ariss, a home cook and the market's marketing project manager and events coordinator, for inspiration.

"Now that we're a week into the new year," says Ariss, "most of us are at least thinking about forming healthier eating habits, which means different things to different people, but almost all of us can find some common ground with one simple and timeless rule: Eat your vegetables!"

See also: Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: homemade limoncello

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Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: homemade limoncello

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Whitney Arris

Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with a spacious kitchen. They often bring some of their market's best ingredients home with them and cook up a feast, and when they're not cooking at home, they're working with the staff at Marczyk's to create recipes for the rest of us to enjoy, usually turning to Whitney Ariss, a home cook and the market's marketing project manager and events coordinator, for inspiration.

"Since we're just about at the height of citrus season, I think limoncello makes a really great seasonal gift at Christmastime," says Ariss, adding while the rest of us are braving the brats at the mall, she's using her culinary prowess to offer homemade tidings of joy to her friends and family. "Homemade gifts are the best, because you'll not only save time, but you can also save a load of money. And it's so much more personal and fun," she points out.

See also: Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: foragers risotto

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Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: foragers risotto

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Courtesy of the theurbanalmanac.com.

Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with a spacious kitchen. They often bring some of their market's best ingredients home with them and cook up a feast, and when they're not cooking at home, they're working with the staff at Marczyk's to create recipes for the rest of us to enjoy, usually turning to Whitney Ariss, a home cook and the market's marketing project manager and events coordinator, for inspiration.

"Our produce buyer, Roger Burleigh, was so excited to form a partnership with Hunt & Gather, an awesome local company that carries 'wildcrafted foods,' so everything that comes from Hunt & Gather is foraged, which doesn't get more sustainable or food-nerdy than that," says Ariss, referring specifically to the wild mushrooms that are essential to this risotto dish. The recipe, which first appeared on theurbanalmanac.com, a recipe blog that Barb describes as "Colorado flavors explored," uses chanterelle and porcini mushrooms, but feel free to experiment with whatever fungi you can find. "Even if Denver heats up to a hot forty degrees, you'll want to cook this for a Sunday night dinner," insists Barb, who suggests pairing the dish with a bottle of Sottimano Dolcetto, a "winter red from Italy that's our top seller." It's currently priced at $14.99 a bottle at Marczyk Fine Wines.

See also: Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: roasted squash

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Thanksgiving cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: cauliflower with cheddar cheese sauce

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Laurie Smith

Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with a spacious kitchen. They often bring some of their market's best ingredients home with them and cook up a feast, and when they're not cooking at home, they're working with the staff at Marczyk's to create recipes for the rest of us to enjoy.

"At Thanksgiving, I like to go through my archives, usually Gourmet magazines from the '80s, to see what those long-winded folks were up to," says Barb. "The recipes always taste great, the photography is beautiful, and I often find that a lot of today's food trends are a nod to the past: pickling, growing your own food and canning, so why not actually go back in time?" If you're looking for a last-minute side dish to accompany tomorrow's turkey feast, Barb highly recommends the cauliflower with cheddar sauce recipe that she came across in a 1989 issue of Gourmet. "It's a lovely accompaniment to your Thanksgiving dinner, and the rye bread crumbs really make it," says Barb, adding that the rye bread sold at Marczyk's is the best you'll find.

See also: Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: roasted squash

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Pumpkin Cheese Cake Pie from David Goergen and WOW

Categories: Recipes

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David Goergen of Cru A Wine Bar.
Work Options for Woman has a lot to be thankful for this year -- including a maxed-out enrollment in the program, a record number of graduate placements, and incredible support from local chefs, including Jen Jasinski, who made the non-profit the beneficiary of her efforts on Top Chef Masters. But other chefs have contributed to the cause, including David Goergen, currently executive chef of Cru A Wine Bar in Park Meadows, whose Pumpkin Cheese Cake Pie is WOW's November recipe.

See also:
Jen Jasinski doesn't win Top Chef Masters, but she wins for WOW

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In the kitchen with Nate Booth, chef of the Rio: guacamole

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Lori Midson

In this week's chef and tell interview with Nate Booth, chef of the Rio Grande in Boulder, he makes a bold declaration: "We have the best damn margaritas and Tex-Mex food this side of the Rio Grande," he insists. And while that may be a stretch, it's certainly true that the Rio's food has monumentally improved since its inception, and Booth has been a big part of that movement. I've always had a soft spot for the Rio's cheese enchiladas, and the guacamole, served with pico de gallo, a charred jalapeƱo, cilantro and wedges of lime, is laudable, too. The recipe, which Booth shares on the next page, is simple and only takes a few minutes to make. "The fewer ingredients you use, the better the flavor," says Booth, adding that "finding the freshest ingredients you can get your hands on" -- ripe avocados; fat, ripe limes full of juice; and leafy, very green and aromatic cilantro -- are key.

See also: The Rio's Nate Booth: "We have the best damn margaritas and Tex-Mex food this side of the Rio Grande"


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Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: roasted squash

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Whitney Ariss

Pete Marczyk and Barbara Macfarlane do not leave their work behind when they leave Marczyk Fine Foods and head for their great old Denver house with a spacious kitchen. They often bring some of their market's best ingredients home with them and cook up a feast, and when they're not cooking at home, they're working with the staff at Marczyk's to create recipes for the rest of us to enjoy, often turning to Whitney Ariss, a home cook and the market's marketing project manager and events coordinator, for inspiration.

"There are so many things I love about squash, not the least of which is how sturdy they are," says Arris. "A lot of people like to peel the squash, dice up the flesh and freeze it raw, which is a perfectly decent method, except for one thing: The prep work sucks," she admits. Instead, advises Arris, who shares her roasted squash recipe on the next page, roast the squash first, scrape the flesh from the skin and then freeze it. "Having precooked squash on hand is fodder for near-instant meals, plus it makes squash soup or sauce a cinch and doesn't require any fancy knife work, which makes it faster and less dangerous for those home cooks who have less-than-great knife skills," she notes.

See also: Cooking with Pete and Barb Marczyk: La Vie en Marczyk cassoulet

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