Readers: Denver Post no longer relevant to our lives -- or is it?

Our interview yesterday with the Denver Post's Mike Littwin about his column moving to the op-ed pages prompted a nasty attack on the Mile High City's paper of record.

That was followed by a defense of the broadsheet -- sort of.

Denver natives wrote:

The Post no longer is relevant to our lives. Though they shuffle features and columns in the paper, it has withered into a boring product with tired reporters, editors and columnists.

Give us the New York Times with a Rocky Mountain regional insert. Digital is fine. Include fresh, vibrant perspectives that can be found nowhere else. No need to spend more cash or time perusing Denver's lackluster media.

Kbeegle55 replied:

@Denver natives, Yeah, the almighty Times to the rescue. Why, nothing happens around here that's really worth reporting thoroughly anyway, right? The Post has its problems but it's what we've got. Do you Post haters really think we'd be better off without a daily paper here?

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Diane
Diane

Robert, I can appreciate a good rant, but I think you're technically wrong. I work downtown, and the parade disbanded today in that park across the street from the statehouse. What would be the point of running a map since the parade basically just goes up 17th Street? If that's your best argument against the Post, well, it's not much of an argument, is it? Didn't the Post break the story about McInnis, and the stories about the Tea Party guy who had a lot of financial and ethical problems? That seems valuable to me, but if you wanted them to win, I can see how you would have an irrational ax to grind.

Robert
Robert

The bit about the Stock Parade is just an anecdote about the blundering ineptitude I discover almost every time I look at the Post, not a general argument against its existence per se. Many people appreciate the information available on maps -- I have read other newspapers that were willing and able to provide them. I walked to 16th and Tremont (I thought; it may have been Court) where I spoke to two officers of the DPD on bikes, who told me that the parade participants (livestock, at least, I suppose, and their handlers) returned to Wynkoop on 15th (a map might serve to show people where the thing actually began and ended, as well as to serve to warn motorists away from the affected streets). I was at the Capitol and the intersection of Broadway & Colfax before 1:00 but I didn't see any sign of the parade, though I could smell it when I got onto the Mall.

As for the Post helping to stave off the evil Republicans, no, I am not impressed. McInnis and Maes were both unspeakably bad, and that's why they were crushed at the polls. I'm more concerned about the caliber of leader thrown up by the local Democratic machine. I have no confidence that Hickenlooper can or even wants to accomplish progressive change.

Robert
Robert

I can't resist posting here (as well as in reponse to the post about Ritter's ride in the stock parade) the Post's description of the National Western Stock Show parade: "The National Western Stock Show's annual longhorn cattle drive and parade through the streets of downtown Denver was today along 17th Street from Union Station to the state Capitol." another version had it that "Longhorn steer were herded through downtown Denver Thursday as the city welcomed the return of the National Western Stock Show. Cowgirls and cowboys rode on horseback from the city's historic Union Station to the state Capitol and bands carefully marched behind them in the event's opening parade." -- the parade apparently never gets closer than about three blocks from the Capitol, and has never gone there according to officers I asked on the 16th St Mall. Too bad if you were a tourist expecting livestock and marching bands to appear at the Capitol based on what you read in the Post. Any competent newspaper would accompany such articles with a map of the parade in question -- not the Post. The disconnection of the Post from what is going on immediately outside their own building is astonishing.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

I, for one, am glad the Post is still here -- but I'm old-fashioned that way. Thanks for sharing your views, Robert and Harvey.

Robert
Robert

Westword and you should be aspiring to supplant the Post.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Robert, I think more voices is preferable to fewer -- which is one of the reasons I lamented the disappearance of the Rocky Mountain News. And despite the challenges confronting the newspaper industry, the Post continues to have more resources than any other media agency in the state. More resources means more reporting, and in my view, that's all to the good.

Harvey
Harvey

Interesting that Kbeegle55 referred to the Post as a "daily paper" instead of a "daily newspaper". The Post stopped being a newspaper a few years ago. Now it's just reprints of AP or Times stories with a bunch of idiotic editorials. It's like the "Today Show" without the occasional eye-candy. It's only use as a "daily paper" would be after my morning constitutional.

Robert
Robert

In answer to Kbeegle55, I would have to say "yes!". The Post's journalistic standard can hardly sink further in any regard -- if it folded, the way would be clear for someone else to try, and I believe they could succeed, but even in failure they could hardly do worse than the D.P. We do need a daily newspaper reporting accurately and forthrightly on local events -- by that standard, Denver does not have a daily right now. The demise of the Denver Post? God Speed the Day!

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