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Medical marijuana: Rep. Cindy Acree says MMJ edibles ban needed to protect children, patients

cindy acree.jpg
Cindy Acree.
We recently told you about HB 1250, a bill that appeared to ban the medical marijuana edibles industry in Colorado. Since then, there's been debate among MMJ community members -- fueled in part by articles like this -- about whether or not that was true. But in advance of today's scheduled debate on the measure, co-sponsoring Cindy Acree confirms that it is -- and she outlines a slew of reasons why she believes the edibles biz is bad for children and patients.

The Republican from House District 40 stresses that medical marijuana patients can still make their own edibles. "They can use it however they want: bake with it, drink it, whatever," she notes. "And it doesn't ban any of the base product, like the oils, the tinctures. If it's in a pill form and you want to grind it up, you can do whatever you want with it. The way it's written now preserves the integrity of the constitutional obligation to make sure patients have access to medicinal products. But the bill would ban edible food and beverage products."

Why? Acree has a myriad of concerns. "Things like 'pot tarts' are showing up on school grounds. And they don't have regulated doses. I think even patients are misled by some of these things.

Thumbnail image for simply pure coconut almond cups.JPG
Coconut almond cups from Simply Pure.
"Remember, this is still against federal law," she continues. "Anyone who doesn't have a prescription who ends up with one of these products can be charged, and are in many cases charged, with possession."

Acree points out that "I used to be very involved in trademark law, and our threshold for trademark infringement was something that was 'confusingly similar.' And when you have a green sparkling soda that looks like a Mountain Dew and has a fun label on the front of it -- but in tiny print on the back, it says it's made with marijuana -- that's confusingly similar. I'm shocked you haven't seen General Mills or Post or any of these manufacturers down here talking about trademark violations.

"You can't tell the difference between Rice Krispies treats you buy at Target and some of these other ones. They look just alike. And we're seeing suckers packaged in a way that they could easily end up in the hands of children on school grounds. And patients who are drinking these sodas and eating these products have no way of knowing how much THC is in there. That's not safe, either. If it's a medicinal product, it needs to not only be marketed as a medicinal product, but be clearly identified as a medicinal product."

One possible solution to these issues would be legislation establishing rules for packaging and labeling. But Acree feels the difficulties run so deep that prohibition is the only logical course.

"The constitution only obligates us to provide the product for patients who need it for medical purposes -- and this is far beyond that. This is a new product," she maintains. "This is still against federal law, and while the federal government has been very restrained in terms of stepping on the rights of states that allow this, it's still illegal. That sets people up for when it's dispensed improperly. We're not saying people have to smoke marijuana to get the medical benefits, and we're not trying to deny people access. We just have to consider the problems we're having in the marketplace with an industry that really has no basis in statute."

Thumbnail image for medical marijuana lollipop.jpg
An MMJ lollipop.
This "immediate response to an immediate problem" is still one that gives Acree pause. "I think those of us who really believe in liberty are torn. At what point do we protect those constituents who might be harmed by this? It's a tough call, but I've been getting enough concerned comments from family members, state law enforcement officers, school officials and officials from public health departments that there's a problem -- and that waiting two or three more years to figure out the solution isn't good enough."

Thus far, Acree says she's received "some support" from her fellow legislators, as well as backing from "some marijuana people, who don't want to see this commercialized to the point where their patients are being harmed. They want to be responsible about this, because we can't utilize the FDA. There's no federal testing like there is with pharmaceuticals and clinical trials, because it's against federal law. So we're at a huge disadvantage here. We can't treat this like we would treat any other food or medicinal product."

She adds, "We just want to make sure our patients and kids are safe, and that we're not allowing something that's truly going to be more problematic than the problems it's designed to help."

The public discussion of HB 1250 will take place today in the Old Supreme Court Chambers -- "probably about ten or elevenish," Acree estimates. Page down to see the bill itself, as well as a release about the get-together from an opponent of the measure, the Cannabis Therapy Institute.

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37 comments
ColoradoMedicalMarijuana
ColoradoMedicalMarijuana

Needed to protect children?!?!? Give me a break! That's one of the oldest excuses used when stripping individuals of their rights.

Their are some very valid points on http://www.marijuanaconnection... about this same issue. No ban is not required, it's overkill. Some simple labeling regulations would fit the bill.

some random chick
some random chick

You've all made some really great points about how the ban would hurt patients. But no one has noticed how the ban would've actually hurt children.

Make your own edibles, Acree said.

If you make something in your own kitchen, you use your own containers.

A medicated cookie in Mom’s cookie jar is a lot more insidious than one in its own pre-labeled packaging. Especially if you’re eight, and pretty good at swiping cookies from the jar. Or especially if Dad packed your lunch today. (Oops.)

For sticky fingers, a baker’s dozen is easier to pilfer from than an individually-packaged snack. And unless your kitchen equipment includes an industrial label-maker, you wouldn’t stamp each batch with ingredients, potency, and handy notes-to-self about what NOT to do (give it to children; operate machinery)—all the information typed on a typical Colorado edible today.

Thanks, Westword, for showing us Acree's original goal: unlabeled edibles. You proved how rapidly she reversed her position (to the current push for labeled edibles, like the ones we budtenders already sell). I had to borrow one of your Acree quotes:

"I'm shocked you haven't seen General Mills or Post or any of these manufacturers down here talking about trademark violations."

Finally, someone is sticking up for multinational food corporations. That's kind of like sticking up for children--as long as you don't care about the obese ones.

Wait, you have an even better Acree quote:

"If it's in a pill form and you want to grind it up, you can do whatever you want with it."

There's an example for kids. And, perfect--pills are something they CAN easily obtain. And they WILL be inundated with pharma-marketing for pills, whether or not we change MMJ marketing today.

Protector of children--or protector of trademarks and big business? (Hint: her company is named "Protektmark.")

http://wordtender.wordpress.co...

Thank you so much for the information!

Concerned for (the) US
Concerned for (the) US

Interesting that the Marijuana Industry Group had nothing to say on the matter. Could it be that they were involved in this helping craft this bill and that it is part of a long term plan to bring big pharma into the picture? Medibles are the main competition to a neat little pill. No medibles, means more business if/when they can synthesize the chem makeup of this truly diverse natural compound. Judging by the fear-mongering, lies, and Representative collusion (cap'n chronic...really?) seems like we might just have to check the donor rolls. What do you say Ms. Acree? What vested interest do you have in this when children die from 'medicine' that looks like pez candy? At least we agree on one thing Ms Acree: "I think those of us who REALLY believe in liberty are torn"

Rgator53
Rgator53

Since I was one of the licensed Colorado Medical Marijuana Patients that was there almost two hours before the House Judiciary took testimony and been involved in the industry for some time, I would like to make some corrections to this article.

First the bill’s sponsor told the press that the testimony would start at approximately 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM. With nearly 100 MMJ Patients there at 11:00 AM to testify, a hand written paper sign was taped to the door stating that the testimony for HB 11-1250 would not start until 1:00 PM. This caused many Patients and advocates that planned to testify to leave, realizing they had to make their other commitments for the day as well.

When the testimony finally did start, the entire public found out for the first time that the bill’s sponsor, Representative Cindy Acree decided to entirely change the bill’s purpose and wanted to add amendments that would continue to allow edibles and the bill would only be about the labeling, packing and marketing of edibles! This is quite a change at the very last moment to inform everyone.

Rep. Acree at the beginning of the testimony brought out commercial products to show how this can affect children. She presented a box of Quaker Oats brand Capt. Crunch, Sparkling Lime Soda made by Izze of Boulder, CO, Crispy Marshmallow Bites and Soakers Fruit Snacks, both made by Target. There were no actual examples of any MMJ edibles! (So we are lead to believe that these products can be associated to MMJ edibles!)

The pictures of the “Pot Tarts” and the “Cap’n Chronic” were brought up repeatedly by Rep. Waller. He seemed to be deeply troubled by these pictures. The odd thing about these two products was the fact that no one in the audience was actually aware of these products. None of the dispensary owners sold the product, no Patients had ever seen the products in question and no one there could produce an example. Fortunately there is WiFi for the public to use and quickly research was done. Apparently more research was done during the next hour than had been done by Rep. Acree before she wrote this bill!

Come to find out that the “Pot Tarts” had never been sold in Colorado and the picture came from a 1986 DEA bust in California! The “Cap’n Chronic Cereal” image is of a famous stoner T-shirt and has NEVER been sold as an edible anywhere! These two items were harped on time and time again by Rep. Waller. If these House Representatives want to make laws for real Patients, they had better get their facts correct first!

Being in the MMJ industry here in Colorado, I can assure the public, as well as the many business owners that testified, this industry is pretty well self-policed. This was said over and over. It was also pointed out by Matt Cook of the Department of Revenue and some of the other representatives, as well as by Patients and advocates that HB10-1284 already includes six pages of rules and regulations about labeling, packing and marketing of these edibles and is far more thought out than this bill. This new bill is nothing more than over reaching and redundancy.

Rep. Acree said that there probably would be future amendments and that the bill may change again entirely. The Committee did not vote on the bill or the amendments, which means that the edible ban is still on the table too. So it was unclear why Rep. Acree moved forward with the bill and wasted 6 hours of testimony from the public on a bill that really hasn't even been written yet.

As stated, I got there just after 11:00 AM and it was not until about 5:25 PM before I was able to testify myself! I pointed out how this bill was nothing more than fear mongering and redundancy.

The next step will be for the House Judiciary Committee to meet again and consider all amendments to the bill, including new ones not yet written. However, they will not take any more public testimony before they vote.

Having said all this, I think the People of Colorado could be far better served by our Public Servants, those we voted into office, if they would actually be doing something that is creatively good for the public. This bill was obviously ill-conceived and never should have been brought before the House.

solar_satellite
solar_satellite

What is really pathetic is the way any number of people supposed to be on our side still don't get it; the cops say "jump", and these characters only response is "how high?". If you think that the best way to prosecute a debate is to concede most of your opponents' claims, you should not open your mouth in the first place; leave the job to those with a clue. There is no "problem"; Colorado schoolchildren do NOT have access to edibles. There is no general perception that there is such a problem -- the assertion originates with prohibitionist cops. Instead of commending this miserable, fascist tool, consider the damage you do by endorsing claims that medicinal cannabis is showing up in schools.

solar_satellite
solar_satellite

Acree swallowed the CDIA lies whole. The General Assembly routinely takes false testimony from prohibitionist cops and its members show only a desultory and individual interest in distinguishing truth from fiction. The bill would: 1) ban all edibles, 2) ban edibles which might appeal to a minor, OR 3) require tamper-proof packaging -- the bill and its rewrites were all under discussion simultaneously in a procedural morass that quickly deteriorated into five hours of general discussion of cannabis. The "problem" these different measures are intended to address is that people increasingly realize that cannabis is much less threatening than legal and freely available drugs -- no connection whatsoever between cannabis sold through the General Assembly's cannabis-distribution system and schoolchildren was established. At the conclusion of the hearing, Acree seemed peeved that her incoherent effort had been met with opposition -- we are supposed to be grateful that she won't push for an unconstitutional total ban. Acree is a stupid fascist. If she represents Colorado, democracy is not possible here.

lmmind
lmmind

"some marijuana people"

lol, to think they used to call us hippies.

JoshuaR
JoshuaR

I will not give up any freedoms for 'protection' or 'safety' because once I give that up, what will they take next?!

veteran
veteran

How Many children have been hurt by MMJ Medibles?

How many children have been hurt by cigarettes?

How many children are being hurt by alcohol?

How many children are being hurt by prescription medication?

How many children are being hurt by dumb ass politicians wasting our time on legislating restrictions on a non toxic substance like marijuana?

MMJ Patient since 90100% disabled Service Connected Veteran Get it rescheduled, stop the madness.

The Releaf Center
The Releaf Center

We applaud Rep. Cindy Acree (R-Aurora) for touching on a truly pressing issue in our country today: protecting children from medicine not intended for their consumption. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, most of the 100,000 Americans hospitalized every year for accidently swallowing medications are children under five. It’s a staggering statistic, and one that is unacceptable. Unfortunately, Rep. Acree’s bill would do little to protect them.

Medications, such as Fentanyl, are packaged in lollipop form for patients to allow for quicker release into the blood stream. Many alcoholic beverages come in packages nearly identical to popular energy drinks. And when it comes down to it, pills look like candy, whether they contain medical marijuana or not. A glycerine tincture tastes like a dropper full of honey. Even the proposed regulations still leave children very vulnerable.

We would argue that an edible product never looks “just like” one purchased “at Target”, as Rep. Acree stated in a recent interview with Westword.com. The list of disclaimers these manufacturers are required to add to their products is about as long as the ingredients in processed cheese. If we at The Releaf Center were an infused products manufacturer for a medicated beverage, our label would need to include the following:

“This product contains medical marijuana. This product was manufactured without any regulatory oversight for health, safety or efficacy. There may be health risks associationed with the consumption or use of this product. The Releaf Center, LLC. 2000 West 32nd Avenue, Denver, CO 80211. Net weight: 12 ounces. Ingredients: Filtered Water, Organic Lemonade Concentrate, Organic Agave Nectar, Organic Cannabis, Natural Flavor Extracts. Use by 1/1/10. Batch #12345. This product is intended for medical use solely by the patient to whom it is sold. Any resale or distribution of medical marijuana is prohibited. State License #: 12345. Fertilizers: Fish Meal, Composted Seabird Guano, Kelp, Amino Acids, Rock Phosphate, Potassium Carbonate, Magnesium Carbonate, Calcium Carbonate. Nutrition Facts: Calories from Sugar: 120 Total fat 0g Cholesterol 0 Trans Fat 0 Saturated fat 0 Potassium 14mg Sodium 8mg Total Carbohydrates 32g Dietary Fiber 1g, Sugars 32g Protein 0g THC 80mg Vitamin C 65mg Magnesium 0.3mg B3-Niacin 8.6mg B6-Pyridine 2.2mg B12-Cobalamin 6mcg. * Percent Daily Values are based ona 2,000 calorie diet. ”

We only listed the ingredients of one popular fertilizer here. This is a lot to read, but you’ll notice one thing: state regulations don’t currently ask for any warning for children. (see notes below)

In the status quo, edibles companies are taking the lead and many add warnings to let patients know they need to keep these products away from children. They rigorously test their products with a variety of labs to provide patients with accurate dosing information, also helping them improve their internal processes. A majority of products that we offer at The Releaf Center include both warnings and THC content. Raw bud or smokable oils, however, provide absolutely no indication of THC content in milligrams, yet the state hasn’t sought to regulate how much THC is taken in a “hit”.

When HB1284 was passed, legislators were smart to include a provision that prohibits advertising that is designed to appeal to minors. It seems that instead of banning edible products, it would be wise to add an enforcement arm to this provision. If a medical marijuana product is truly being marketed to look like one designed for a child, they should be punished. While Rep. Acree argues that commercialization will have an adverse effect on the industry, we’d argue the opposite. As more and more professionals enter the industry, labeling and testing are now the standard, not the exception. Saying that all edible products appeal to children is casting too wide of a net.

The notion that patients can still make their edibles shows a fundamental misunderstanding of the difficulty involved in the process. Cannabis must be cooked at specific temperatures to prevent burning off the many cannabinoids that provide medical benefit. Hard candies provide an immense relief to patients, but require special equipment to produce. Patients that live in government housing or even an apartment complex can’t cook with cannabis for fear of eviction from their homes. These are people we must protect.

Finally, harm from edibles is negligible. We’ve yet to see a single death from an edible medical marijuana product. While it’s easy to say that there are “concerns” from a variety of groups, that doesn’t amount to hard evidence. The fact that edibles have been a safe alternative to smoking for nearly all medical marijuana patients speaks to the diligence of these companies. We shouldn’t penalize them for a harm that simply isn’t out there.

A simple solution to the problem would be to add provisions that encourage tamper-proof packaging, a warning for children, while strengthening provisions that prohibit advertising to children.

Notes:

Labeling provisions in HB1284:

(I) THAT THE PRODUCT CONTAINS MEDICAL MARIJUANA;

(II) THAT THE PRODUCT IS MANUFACTURED WITHOUT ANY REGULATORY OVERSIGHT FOR HEALTH, SAFETY, OR EFFICACY; AND

(III) THAT THERE MAY BE HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE CONSUMPTION OR USE OF THE PRODUCT.Labeling provisions in the MMED draft rules:

A) No licensee, for the sale of medical marijuana shall sell, transfer or give away any medical marijuana that does not contain a label with a list of all ingredients, including all chemical additives, including but not limited to nonorganic pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers that were used in its cultivation and production.

2. All medical marijuana-infused products which are sold, offered for sale or exposed for sale, or transported within the State of Colorado for sale shall bear thereon or have attached thereto in a conspicuous place a plainly written or printed label or tag in the English language, giving the following information, which statement shall not be modified or denied in the labeling or on another label attached to the product:

a. an identity statement;

b. a net weight statement;

c. a list of ingredients;

d. a recommended use by or expiration date;

e. batch tracking information;

f. basic medical and/or legal warning information; and

g. statement of the company name and State Licensing Authority license number, together with the company’s telephone number or mailing address or website information;

3. The minimum print size for each of the three required statements for non infused products and for each of the seven required statements for medical marijuana-infused products is 1/16 inch. The size of the characters in the net weight statement is determined by the area of the principal display panel and may be greater than 1/16 inch.

4. For medical marijuana-infused products, the product identity and net weight statements must appear on the portion of the label displayed to the consumer.

5. When a medical marijuana-infused product is made specifically for a designated patient, the label of that product shall state the patient’s Medical Marijuana Registry number.

6. The list of ingredients and company name statements must be conspicuously listed on the medical marijuana-infused product package.

7. A nutrition facts panel may be required if nutritional claims are made on the label of any medical marijuana-infused product.

This article may also be found here: http://blog.thereleafcenter.co...

Denver Relief
Denver Relief

While waiting for the public hearing to begin, we were told by Capitol staff that the House was in recess and will begin the hearing at 1 PM. Patients, MMC owners and concerned citizens....it isn't too late. Please come down and join us. Make yourself heard!

AncientMedicine
AncientMedicine

OUT-OF-TOUCH GRANDSTANDING

It is mind-boggling how some reps, like Cindy Acree, are so incredibly out-of-touch with the will of their people; so incredibly out-of-touch with cannabis's medical history and medical fact; and have no problem undermining Colorado's Constitution and sabotaging their constituents' medical care.

More fear mongering -- with no real facts or data -- but this irrational, fear-based propaganda seems to be fashionable with some "way-behind-the-learning-curve" Nanny Democrats and Nanny Repugs. But these obtuse reps need to re-examine their positions on this issue, as approximately 80 percent of Americans support access to medicinal cannabis and don't support using our scarce resources to over-regulate and to lock people up for following their physicians' recommendations:

(ABC News/Washington Post Poll: 81 Percent Support Legalizing Marijuana for Medical Use: http://abcnews.go.com/images/P... )

The medical cannabis industry was the fastest growing industry in Colorado and has provided tens of thousands of patients with medical relief from an array of conditions and symptoms and has provided the state many millions in just center fees alone; but the fools, like Acree, are deliberately sabotaging this thriving industry -- during the worst economic times in decades -- and are trying to make decisions that are supposed to be made by physicians.

Stay out of our medical care, Rep. Acree, please. And you may want to do a little objective reading, because your type of knee-jerk hysterics are turning many patients and many other rational, logical people -- not prone to hysterical reactions about medicine -- away from both main parties, because there are way too many foolish nannies, hurting their constituents with their irrational, fantasy-based, fear mongering.

Hundreds of thousands of edibles have been sold over the last ten years. How many children actually got their hands on these and ended up in the hospitals? How many actual, documented incidents of cannabis showing up in elementary schools? I can't think of a single account. But like many other patients and advocates, I am for strong penalties for those who give/sell any cannabis products to children, unless the minor is one of the few, rare minors with a legal, physician's recommendation to use medical cannabis.

But not one account that I can find. I am not saying it did not or cannot happen, but I guarantee you children did get a hold of oxycontin, vicodiin, xanax, etc...which can kill them, easily. According to the American Public Health Association, cannabis cannot cause lethal reactions, even in children. But adults should lock their cannabis products away, just like they should lock up their other, potentially fatal medicines.

How many unsolved murders are there in Colorado, again? What are you doing about these and how are you helping to balance the budget, Cindy?

Please stop spreading unjustified fear and catch up on the real facts, Rep. Acree. Thanks

Angelslittlebird
Angelslittlebird

This is such a crock of shit. "You can't tell the difference between Rice Krispies treats you buy at Target and some of these other ones. They look just alike." Um, hello, I didn't know they were selling MMJ RKTs at regular stores. I thought you actually had to go to a dispensary or make them yourself. Protect the kids, my ass.

Larryq5
Larryq5

What a fricking quack! Let's see, I do believe the water industry should crack down on the vodka industry for similar "patent look -a-like in a bottle ya can take it to school in a thermos bake it in a cookie" infringement deal thingie she has going on. Quack quack!

dolcevespa
dolcevespa

There should be a bill to ban aspirin then since it's way more dangerous than cannabis. I'd feel a lot better knowing my child ingested cannabis accidentally then I would if he/she ingested aspirin.

TheDeacon
TheDeacon

Ever heard of Fentanyl? It is a very addictive narcotic. It is the choice drug of Anesthesiologist's who are addicted to narcotics. It is usually used in liquid/injection form for surgery. But for years Fentanyl has been prescribed as a pain killer. It comes in many forms, Including a Lolly pop form i.e. Hard Candy. Why is it OK with Deadly Narcotics but not OK for safe & therapeutic cannabis. At worst a person who eats Medical Marijuana edibles needlessly might suffer from an anxiety attack and a mild one at that. Nothing like you get on cocaine, meth & Heroin. I see the worry, it is caused from Fear & Ignorance not form actual Truth. Educate yourself for the good of the country!

Tony Bowles
Tony Bowles

I don't get it. Acree say's that "medical marijuana patients can still make their own edibles, but the bill would ban edible food and beverage products." How does that work. Patients benefit from access to edibles. Not all patients can or want to smoke cannabis. Many find tinctures (cannabis extracts) or edibles (such as baked goods containing cannabis) to be more effective for their conditions. Allowing dispensaries to carry these items is vital to patients getting best level of care possible.

DenverLiberal
DenverLiberal

If the main concern is that it looks like another product, why not regulate the packaging and appearance? Too difficult for Acree apparently so just prohibit it instead, which we know ALWAYS works right?

"And patients who are drinking these sodas and eating these products have no way of knowing how much THC is in there."Not true. Many edibles are lab tested for potency.

"We just have to consider the problems we're having in the marketplace with an industry that really has no basis in statute."Not true. Have you heard of HB 10-1284? Or the millions of dollars the Department of Revenue has collected in licensing fees? Much of that from 200 plus regulated edibles manufacturers?

"I think those of us who really believe in liberty are torn." Your actions belie your professed beliefs. If you really believed in liberty and individual choice you would never have introduced this garbage. "Liberty" to you is a hollow concept.

YourJokingRight?
YourJokingRight?

You know, as stupid as this sounds, she kinda makes a point. Having beverages look like normal soda, drugged candy in normal packaging, it does make sense to do something. After all, we don't sell percocet in twinkie form.

Wanda James
Wanda James

HOW ABOUT SOME LAWS TO PROTECT KIDS FROM ENERGY DRINKS. Read more: Pediatrics report details risks to kids from energy drinks - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/sear...

OR THE BIG ISSUE IN COLORADO - PRESCRIPTION DRUGSDenver Post Article Feb 28, 2011Read more: Prescription-drug abuse a growing pain for law enforcement - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/news...

"The numbers of people who died from prescription-drug abuse rose 95 percent in Colorado in almost a decade, according to the DEA.

In 2000, there were 228 deaths in the state linked to prescription drugs. By 2009, 445 people died from abusing painkillers in Colorado.

In Denver, 70 percent of the drug-related deaths are attributable to painkillers, said Kevin Merrill, acting special agent in charge of the DEA's Denver division."

Has anyone ever died from MMJ? Why are the elected officials spending so much time on this when other factors are killing us? I would suggest we figure out to protect ourselves from Big Pharma. And let's begin by looking at the money Big Pharma gives to campaigns to get these people elected.

joe mama
joe mama

yo, bitch, you're sworn to uphold state laws and not federal laws. stop with the 'still illegal federally' shit. why do we let these fear mongering lying dickfaces get to tell us how to live our lives? a minority dictating what is right for the majority will never work and never has. what a filthy bitch. i don't believe in god and shit like that but sometimes i do hope there is a hell as that will be the only way these lying prohibitionists fuckholes will get what they deserve for what they have done to people. you self-righteous sons a bitches.

thedawg
thedawg

More Nanny-State BS from a closet authoritarian...

solar_satellite
solar_satellite

Not so -- Greg Goldfogel spoke for the MMIG. He had almost everyone in the room raising their hands to indicate support for keeping cannabis out of the hands of children and non-patients. I did not raise my hand; I do not support the passage of any new laws or regulations for the purpose of criminalizing the transfer of cannabis to anyone -- we have plenty already.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Concerned for (the) US, I've been trying to get the Medical Marijuana Industry Group to comment on a range of issues for quite some time, without luck -- but we're not surrendering. We'll keep you up to date on our progress. Thanks for the post.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Rgator53, thanks for sharing your observations in such detail. Much appreciated.

Cammaiah
Cammaiah

Wish All amercans thought like you

The Releaf Center
The Releaf Center

We'd also like to note that this heavily amended (once again) at the last minute. Not only was there a lot of time wasted in our community preparing testimony and comment, but more importantly, the time of patients who traveled from across the state.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Another strong take, AncientMedicine. Appreciate you sharing it with us.

02
02

No we sell Heroine aka fentynol in a sucker.....get real...wake up ..take the blinders off...

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

That's a very interesting image, YourJoking Right -- so interesting we're going to make your post an upcoming Comment of the Day. Congrats.

Duchess Of Dank
Duchess Of Dank

it is a retail business and there is competition out there. an edible company has to make their product more appealing than another company's product. someone people don't look at the active MG THC dosages in it, sometimes packaging catches the eye.

TheDeacon
TheDeacon

Read my response I left right before yours. Fentanyl Lolly Pops is a deadly narcotic in Hard Candy form. Why is it OK to do this with a fatal & addictive narcotic but not with safe cannabis?

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Wanda, very strong post. Thanks for sharing it with us.

Cammaiah
Cammaiah

Why dont you stand up for rights instead of regulation .

Releaf you and others have some clout if you would together stand up against ALL the maddnes that comes out of the state.

Kathleen has more balls than most of you winey ass MMCsYou dont know a right from a privlage.

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