Medical marijuana: HB 1250 edibles bill hearing stars Cap'n Chronic, Pot Tarts (PHOTOS)

pot tarts cropped.JPG
Pot Tarts.
In a Monday interview about HB 1250, co-sponsoring Representative Cindy Acree said the bill would outlaw the medical marijuana edibles business. But between her Westword interview and yesterday's hearing, the focus switched from a total ban to marketing and labeling -- and according to MMJ attorney Warren Edson, law enforcement used as scare tactics one bogus product (Cap'n Chronic) and another (Pot Tarts) never sold in Colorado.

During the aforementioned interview, Acree complained about MMJ edibles that looked identical to unmedicated products. But when asked if legislation establishing rules for packaging and labeling might solve these problems without prohibiting the industry as a whole, she claimed otherwise.

cindy acree photo.jpg
Cindy Acree.
"The constitution only obligates us to provide the product for patients who need it for medical purposes -- and this is far beyond that. This is a new product," she said. "This is still against federal law, and while the federal government has been very restrained in terms of stepping on the rights of states that allow this, it's still illegal. That sets people up for when it's dispensed improperly. We're not saying people have to smoke marijuana to get the medical benefits, and we're not trying to deny people access. We just have to consider the problems we're having in the marketplace with an industry that really has no basis in statute."

Apparently, she and her fellow sponsors changed their mind. Edson, who attended the hearing and participated in a public-comments segment, said the conversation centered around new language that reads:

...PROHIBITIONS AND LIMITATIONS ON MARKETING PRACTICES FOR MEDICAL MARIJUANA-INFUSED PRODUCTS THAT ARE DESIGNED TO APPEAL TO OR ATTRACT MINORS OR HAVE THE EFFECT OF APPEALING TO OR ATTRACTING MINORS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THOSE PRODUCTS THAT ARE CONFUSINGLY SIMILAR TO COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED FOOD AND BEVERAGE PRODUCTS.

capn chronic cereal.jpg
The Cap'n Chronic graphic.
To illustrate troubles the bill is meant to address, the Colorado Drug Investigators Association circulated a letter featuring photos of Cap'n Chronic and Pot Tarts, whose labels parody Cap'n Crunch cereal and Pot Tarts toaster pastries. But Edson says law enforcement didn't cite specific Colorado incidents when these items were spotted, and after a few minutes of web searching, he knows why.

"If you Google Cap'n Chronic, you'll see it's a T-shirt for sale at places like Spencer's Gifts," he says. "I'm not aware of there having been a real Cap'n Chronic product ever. And if you Google Pot Tarts, you find out that they were found during a March 2006 bust in California. So their example of harm being done in Colorado is a mythical product and one that was never in Colorado and was shut down five years ago. That was the best they could come up with."

In Edson's view, this absurdity was in keeping with the tone of the event, at which "it was clear a lot of the people on the committee didn't know anything about what they were discussing."

Example? "The Department of Revenue has been working on micro-rules about labeling and packaging for the last six months," he notes, "but there were people on the committee who didn't have any idea about that. The people making the rules didn't have any understanding of the rules that were already in place."

Thumbnail image for edson.jpg
Warren Edson.
During his time before the committee, Edson argued that "copyright patent laws would take care of any kind of confusion" -- and as a result, "the market would take care of itself, which we've seen in California after some businesses received cease-and-desist orders on a variety of silly stuff they did out there."

This approach was countered by law enforcement representatives, who pointed to a number of Colorado-based incidents in which children were able to get their hands on marijuana-infused edibles. But in each of those cases, Edson maintains, "the issue seemed to be about parenting in terms of these edibles being left in areas where kids could get them," rather than confusing labeling.

In addition, folks from edibles-industry mainstays such as Twirling Hippy Confections noted that their products are already properly labeled, with the information giving patients an idea of the item's THC level -- another complaint voiced by Acree in her Westword interview. "There was testimony from one patient who uses edibles that she used to get them unlabeled, and she'd have to take a little nibble and set it aside until she could figure out how potent it was," Edson points out. "But then she found a center that uses labeling, and she doesn't have to do that anymore."

In the end, the committee "laid over" the bill "for three or four days, or maybe until their next meeting, a week after that," Edson says, presumably to give Acree more time to finalize the bill's language. That's frustrating, he adds, since "this was the only time the public will be able to comment on it," and the measure was in such flux that no one in the audience or on the committee seemed to be quite sure what it might ultimately do.

"It's amazing this thing could get as far as it did, based on a T-shirt and a friggin' five-year-old case," Edson says.

Page down to see photos of the proceedings courtesy of the Cannabis Therapy Institute:

My Voice Nation Help
24 comments
Anon
Anon

I like how she was drinking diet mountain dew... Diet mountain dew has caffeine, which is far more addictive than marijuana, and phenylalanine in it, which (in my opinion) is far more dangerous than marijuana as well (I get a nasty migraine from even a teensy bit of phenylalanine!). This whole thing is absurd.

Minatour48
Minatour48

Anyone who stayed until the end miss the WHOPPER of a lie that Rep. Acree tried to spout. She said, "Regarding marijuana deaths. Granted they aren't typically documented, but the FDA, in their schedule of drug classification reported deaths, does show that while pharmaceutical deaths are significantly higher than marijuana, death, marijuana was still listed as 200, the secondary cause of 279 deaths. So to me that does indicate that there is some opportunity there for danger.”

I corrected her and was kicked out. This is a lie and I emailed them to prove it, with facts! Below is the email I sent to the Committee. Feel free to email it to them as well so we can get an answer on why the people who we elected are trying to base policy on lies and misrepresentations of fact.

Members of the House Judiciary Committee, I was a disheartened yesterday to see a complete misrepresentation of the facts put forward to protect against a non-existent threat. As Mark Twain said “One of the most striking differences between a cat and a lie is that a cat has only nine lives.” As Rep. Acree stated yesterday, "Regarding marijuana deaths. Granted they aren't typically documented, but the FDA, in their schedule of drug classification reported deaths, does show that while pharmaceutical deaths are significantly higher than marijuana, death, marijuana was still listed as 200, the secondary cause of 279 deaths. So to me that does indicate that there is some opportunity there for danger.” It’s a scary statement if true, which it is not. Rep. Acree said she got her information from the FDA but she neglected to mention the disclaimer. The disclaimer from the FDA, says about the report stated by Rep. Acree, "The information contained in the reports has not been scientifically or otherwise verified. For any given report there is no certainty that the suspected drug caused the reaction. This is because physicians are encouraged to report suspected reactions. The event may have been related to the underlying disease for which the drug was given to concurrent drugs being taken or may have occurred by chance at the same time the suspected drug was taken.Numbers from these data must be carefully interpreted as reported rates and not occurrence rates. True incidence rates cannot be determined from this database. Comparisons of drugs cannot be made from these data." (Emphasis added) July 18, 2005 - FDA Office of Pharmacoepidemiology and Statistical Science, "Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) Brief Description with Caveats of System" As the information quoted is almost six years old I feel compelled to provide you with the most current information regarding this non-existent threat. Here is a copy of an email from the Colorado department of health I received yesterday March 1, 2011. Hi Corey – This type of information is not available on CoHID since the cause of death categories are based on underlying cause of death – which in the case of drug-related deaths will typically be intentional or unintentional poisoning. The specific substance is stored in a separate field and is not queriable in our databaseI’ve reviewed the DAWN website, and it appears that the deaths they are reporting as cannabis-related are just for the Denver metro area – however, I couldn’t find information on which specific agencies are reporting to them. In any event, the coroners/medical examiners are rarely including this information as part of the official cause of death on the death certificate. For 2007-08, I could only identify 5 deaths that occurred in the Denver metro area where cannabis was even mentioned on the death certificate. For the most part, these appear to be the result of a toxicology screen which was positive for cannabis. According to the DAWN criteria, there would have to be more than a tox screen to meet the criteria. From the DAWN data, it appears that any mention of cannabis in their data was associated with another drug or possibly alcohol, since cannabis alone was never identified in a death.I’m sorry that the death data cannot provide you with useful information – except for the fact that the cannabis info was not included on the death certificate so may not be considered to be causal or contributory. (Emphasis added)As I stated yesterday you have a better chance of dying from over hydration then you do from marijuana. There is no threat, this bill is a waste of tax payers money and time. I beg you, please do your research before trying to use misinformation as fact and then create law to protect against a non-existent threat.

MisterT@G
MisterT@G

Cindy Acree, colorado, marijuana, edibles, marketing, tactics, sold, packaging, kellogg, pop tarts, quaker oats, captain crunch, mountain dew, Sparkling Lime Soda, Izze, Crispy Marshmallow Bites, Soakers Fruit Snacks, Target, bogus, complaint, testimony, said, she, has, not, been, laid, during, the, last, six, months, frustrating

I pitty the fool.

Rgator
Rgator

I was one of the licensed Colorado Medical Marijuana Patients that was there almost two hours before the House Judiciary took testimony and been involved in the industry for some time, I would like to make some additions and comments to this article.

First the bill’s sponsor told the press that the testimony would start at approximately 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM. With nearly 100 MMJ Patients there at 11:00 AM to testify, a hand written paper sign was taped to the door stating that the testimony for HB 11-1250 would not start until 1:00 PM. This caused many Patients and advocates that planned to testify to leave, realizing they had to make their other commitments for the day as well.

When the testimony finally did start, the entire public found out for the first time that the bill’s sponsor, Representative Cindy Acree decided to entirely change the bill’s purpose and wanted to add amendments that would continue to allow edibles and the bill would only be about the labeling, packing and marketing of edibles! This is quite a change at the very last moment to inform everyone.

Rep. Acree at the beginning of the testimony brought out commercial products to show how this can affect children. She presented a box of Quaker Oats brand Capt. Crunch, Sparkling Lime Soda made by Izze of Boulder, CO, Crispy Marshmallow Bites and Soakers Fruit Snacks, both made by Target. There were no actual examples of any MMJ edibles! (So we are lead to believe that these products can be associated to MMJ edibles!)

The pictures of the “Pot Tarts” and the “Cap’n Chronic” were brought up repeatedly by Rep. Waller. He seemed to be deeply troubled by these pictures. The odd thing about these two products was the fact that no one in the audience was actually aware of these products. None of the dispensary owners sold the product, no Patients had ever seen the products in question and no one there could produce an example. Fortunately there is WiFi for the public to use and quickly research was done. Apparently more research was done during the next hour than had been done by Rep. Acree before she wrote this bill!

Come to find out that the “Pot Tarts” had never been sold in Colorado and the picture came from a 1986 DEA bust in California! The “Cap’n Chronic Cereal” image is of a famous stoner T-shirt and has NEVER been sold as an edible anywhere! These two items were harped on time and time again by Rep. Waller. If these House Representatives want to make laws for real Patients, they had better get their facts correct first!

Being in the MMJ industry here in Colorado, I can assure the public, as well as the many business owners that testified, this industry is pretty well self-policed. This was said over and over. It was also pointed out by Matt Cook of the Department of Revenue and some of the other representatives, as well as by Patients and advocates that HB10-1284 already includes six pages of rules and regulations about labeling, packing and marketing of these edibles and is far more thought out than this bill. This new bill is nothing more than over reaching and redundancy.

Rep. Acree said that there probably would be future amendments and that the bill may change again entirely. The Committee did not vote on the bill or the amendments, which means that the edible ban is still on the table too. So it was unclear why Rep. Acree moved forward with the bill and wasted 6 hours of testimony from the public on a bill that really hasn't even been written yet.

As stated, I got there just after 11:00 AM and it was not until about 5:25 PM before I was able to testify myself! I pointed out how this bill was nothing more than fear mongering and redundancy.

The next step will be for the House Judiciary Committee to meet again and consider all amendments to the bill, including new ones not yet written. However, they will not take any more public testimony before they vote.

Having said all this, I think the People of Colorado could be far better served by our Public Servants, those we voted into office, if they would actually be doing something that is creatively good for the public. This bill was obviously ill-conceived and never should have been brought before the House.

Rgator53
Rgator53

I was one of the licensed Colorado Medical Marijuana Patients that was there almost two hours before the House Judiciary took testimony and been involved in the industry for some time, I would like to make some additions and comments to this article.

First the bill’s sponsor told the press that the testimony would start at approximately 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM. With nearly 100 MMJ Patients there at 11:00 AM to testify, a hand written paper sign was taped to the door stating that the testimony for HB 11-1250 would not start until 1:00 PM. This caused many Patients and advocates that planned to testify to leave, realizing they had to make their other commitments for the day as well.

When the testimony finally did start, the entire public found out for the first time that the bill’s sponsor, Representative Cindy Acree decided to entirely change the bill’s purpose and wanted to add amendments that would continue to allow edibles and the bill would only be about the labeling, packing and marketing of edibles! This is quite a change at the very last moment to inform everyone.

Rep. Acree at the beginning of the testimony brought out commercial products to show how this can affect children. She presented a box of Quaker Oats brand Capt. Crunch, Sparkling Lime Soda made by Izze of Boulder, CO, Crispy Marshmallow Bites and Soakers Fruit Snacks, both made by Target. There were no actual examples of any MMJ edibles! (So we are lead to believe that these products can be associated to MMJ edibles!)

The pictures of the “Pot Tarts” and the “Cap’n Chronic” were brought up repeatedly by Rep. Waller. He seemed to be deeply troubled by these pictures. The odd thing about these two products was the fact that no one in the audience was actually aware of these products. None of the dispensary owners sold the product, no Patients had ever seen the products in question and no one there could produce an example. Fortunately there is WiFi for the public to use and quickly research was done. Apparently more research was done during the next hour than had been done by Rep. Acree before she wrote this bill!

Come to find out that the “Pot Tarts” had never been sold in Colorado and the picture came from a 1986 DEA bust in California! The “Cap’n Chronic Cereal” image is of a famous stoner T-shirt and has NEVER been sold as an edible anywhere! These two items were harped on time and time again by Rep. Waller. If these House Representatives want to make laws for real Patients, they had better get their facts correct first!

Being in the MMJ industry here in Colorado, I can assure the public, as well as the many business owners that testified, this industry is pretty well self-policed. This was said over and over. It was also pointed out by Matt Cook of the Department of Revenue and some of the other representatives, as well as by Patients and advocates that HB10-1284 already includes six pages of rules and regulations about labeling, packing and marketing of these edibles and is far more thought out than this bill. This new bill is nothing more than over reaching and redundancy.

Rep. Acree said that there probably would be future amendments and that the bill may change again entirely. The Committee did not vote on the bill or the amendments, which means that the edible ban is still on the table too. So it was unclear why Rep. Acree moved forward with the bill and wasted 6 hours of testimony from the public on a bill that really hasn't even been written yet.

As stated, I got there just after 11:00 AM and it was not until about 5:25 PM before I was able to testify myself! I pointed out how this bill was nothing more than fear mongering and redundancy.

The next step will be for the House Judiciary Committee to meet again and consider all amendments to the bill, including new ones not yet written. However, they will not take any more public testimony before they vote.

Having said all this, I think the People of Colorado could be far better served by our Public Servants, those we voted into office, if they would actually be doing something that is creatively good for the public. This bill was obviously ill-conceived and never should have been brought before the House.

Rgator53
Rgator53

I was one of the licensed Colorado Medical Marijuana Patients that was there almost two hours before the House Judiciary took testimony and been involved in the industry for some time, I would like to make some additions and comments to this article.

First the bill’s sponsor told the press that the testimony would start at approximately 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM. With nearly 100 MMJ Patients there at 11:00 AM to testify, a hand written paper sign was taped to the door stating that the testimony for HB 11-1250 would not start until 1:00 PM. This caused many Patients and advocates that planned to testify to leave, realizing they had to make their other commitments for the day as well.

When the testimony finally did start, the entire public found out for the first time that the bill’s sponsor, Representative Cindy Acree decided to entirely change the bill’s purpose and wanted to add amendments that would continue to allow edibles and the bill would only be about the labeling, packing and marketing of edibles! This is quite a change at the very last moment to inform everyone.

Rep. Acree at the beginning of the testimony brought out commercial products to show how this can affect children. She presented a box of Quaker Oats brand Capt. Crunch, Sparkling Lime Soda made by Izze of Boulder, CO, Crispy Marshmallow Bites and Soakers Fruit Snacks, both made by Target. There were no actual examples of any MMJ edibles! (So we are lead to believe that these products can be associated to MMJ edibles!)

The pictures of the “Pot Tarts” and the “Cap’n Chronic” were brought up repeatedly by Rep. Waller. He seemed to be deeply troubled by these pictures. The odd thing about these two products was the fact that no one in the audience was actually aware of these products. None of the dispensary owners sold the product, no Patients had ever seen the products in question and no one there could produce an example. Fortunately there is WiFi for the public to use and quickly research was done. Apparently more research was done during the next hour than had been done by Rep. Acree before she wrote this bill!

Come to find out that the “Pot Tarts” had never been sold in Colorado and the picture came from a 1986 DEA bust in California! The “Cap’n Chronic Cereal” image is of a famous stoner T-shirt and has NEVER been sold as an edible anywhere! These two items were harped on time and time again by Rep. Waller. If these House Representatives want to make laws for real Patients, they had better get their facts correct first!

Being in the MMJ industry here in Colorado, I can assure the public, as well as the many business owners that testified, this industry is pretty well self-policed. This was said over and over. It was also pointed out by Matt Cook of the Department of Revenue and some of the other representatives, as well as by Patients and advocates that HB10-1284 already includes six pages of rules and regulations about labeling, packing and marketing of these edibles and is far more thought out than this bill. This new bill is nothing more than over reaching and redundancy.

Rep. Acree said that there probably would be future amendments and that the bill may change again entirely. The Committee did not vote on the bill or the amendments, which means that the edible ban is still on the table too. So it was unclear why Rep. Acree moved forward with the bill and wasted 6 hours of testimony from the public on a bill that really hasn't even been written yet.

As stated, I got there just after 11:00 AM and it was not until about 5:25 PM before I was able to testify myself! I pointed out how this bill was nothing more than fear mongering and redundancy.

The next step will be for the House Judiciary Committee to meet again and consider all amendments to the bill, including new ones not yet written. However, they will not take any more public testimony before they vote.

Having said all this, I think the People of Colorado could be far better served by our Public Servants, those we voted into office, if they would actually be doing something that is creatively good for the public. This bill was obviously ill-conceived and never should have been brought before the House.

Rgator53
Rgator53

I was one of the licensed Colorado Medical Marijuana Patients that was there almost two hours before the House Judiciary took testimony and been involved in the industry for some time.

First the bill’s sponsor told the press that the testimony would start at approximately 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM. With nearly 100 MMJ Patients there at 11:00 AM to testify, a hand written paper sign was taped to the door stating that the testimony for HB 11-1250 would not start until 1:00 PM. This caused many Patients and advocates that planned to testify to leave, realizing they had to make their other commitments for the day as well.

When the testimony finally did start, the entire public found out for the first time that the bill’s sponsor, Representative Cindy Acree decided to entirely change the bill’s purpose and wanted to add amendments that would continue to allow edibles and the bill would only be about the labeling, packing and marketing of edibles! This is quite a change at the very last moment to inform everyone.

Rep. Acree at the beginning of the testimony brought out commercial products to show how this can affect children. She presented a box of Quaker Oats brand Capt. Crunch, Sparkling Lime Soda made by Izze of Boulder, CO, Crispy Marshmallow Bites and Soakers Fruit Snacks, both made by Target. There were no actual examples of any MMJ edibles! (So we are lead to believe that these products can be associated to MMJ edibles!)

The pictures of the “Pot Tarts” and the “Cap’n Chronic” were brought up repeatedly by Rep. Waller. He seemed to be deeply troubled by these pictures. The odd thing about these two products was the fact that no one in the audience was actually aware of these products. None of the dispensary owners sold the product, no Patients had ever seen the products in question and no one there could produce an example. Fortunately there is WiFi for the public to use and quickly research was done. Apparently more research was done during the next hour than had been done by Rep. Acree before she wrote this bill!

Come to find out that the “Pot Tarts” had never been sold in Colorado and the picture came from a 1986 DEA bust in California! The “Cap’n Chronic Cereal” image is of a famous stoner T-shirt and has NEVER been sold as an edible anywhere! These two items were harped on time and time again by Rep. Waller. If these House Representatives want to make laws for real Patients, they had better get their facts correct first!

Being in the MMJ industry here in Colorado, I can assure the public, as well as the many business owners that testified, this industry is pretty well self-policed. This was said over and over. It was also pointed out by Matt Cook of the Department of Revenue and some of the other representatives, as well as by Patients and advocates that HB10-1284 already includes six pages of rules and regulations about labeling, packing and marketing of these edibles and is far more thought out than this bill. This new bill is nothing more than over reaching and redundancy.

Rep. Acree said that there probably would be future amendments and that the bill may change again entirely. The Committee did not vote on the bill or the amendments, which means that the edible ban is still on the table too. So it was unclear why Rep. Acree moved forward with the bill and wasted 6 hours of testimony from the public on a bill that really hasn't even been written yet.

As stated, I got there just after 11:00 AM and it was not until about 5:25 PM before I was able to testify myself! I pointed out how this bill was nothing more than fear mongering and redundancy.

The next step will be for the House Judiciary Committee to meet again and consider all amendments to the bill, including new ones not yet written. However, they will not take any more public testimony before they vote.

Having said all this, I think the People of Colorado could be far better served by our Public Servants, those we voted into office, if they would actually be doing something that is creatively good for the public. This bill was obviously ill-conceived and never should have been brought before the House.

YourJokingRight?
YourJokingRight?

HEY ACREE? GO F*CK YOURSELF! THERE IS NO ROOM FOR POLITE DISCOURSE REGARDING YOUR POLITICAL GRANDSTANDING AND BULLSHIT ATTEMPT TO MANIPULATE PUBLIC OPINION.

YOU SHOULD STEP DOWN AS YOU HAVE DEMONSTRATED THAT YOU ARE NOT FIT TO SERVE AND WILL JUMP ON ANYTHING THAT GETS YOUR NAME IN THE PAPER.

AGAIN, F*CK YOU!

AncientMedicine
AncientMedicine

While Acree's tactics are sneaky, misleading, unethical, despicable and terribly disturbing, it doesn't surprise me.

Tragically, prohibitionists like Acree are indeed "undeterred by the facts," as CTI correctly pointed out, and will continue their highly unethical attempts to sabotage Colorado's constitutional right to use physician-recommended medicine, regardless of what the real medical and scientific facts are.

By any chance, are there any laws against presenting clearly false information at a formal hearing? Or are there procedural rules against lying on record?

How do we stop these blatant liars from spreading blatant propaganda? The People of Colorado voted for access to medical cannabis a long time ago, but we appear to have elected too many people with serious aversions or allergies to historical, scientific and medical fact.

anonymous
anonymous

I wonder how the folks at KUSH magazine felt having their name dragged through the mud. The bill could be a killer.

target shopper
target shopper

I didn't realize target held an MMC license. Do you need a medical marijuana card to buy products from target?

solar_satellite
solar_satellite

County sherriffs, district attorneys, and drug cops lied and lied and lied, were caught in their lies, and were refuted, whereupon the Denver Post refered to the imaginary cereal (supposed to be showing up in Colorado schools, mind you) by writing: "Marijuana advocates ... questioned whether they actually existed". The Post pisses its yellow journalism all over Colorado. What these hacks do cover, they thoroughly falsify. We need to get the truth out to people who do not read the Latest Word; it sure would help were Westword to write more about the issue.

CTI
CTI

Read our full report from the hearing:http://www.cannabistherapyinst...

The Reefer Madness propaganda campaign based on the age-old "Save the Children" plea began with a letter from the Colorado Drug Investigators Association that had been given to Committee members with photographs of "Pot Tarts" and "Cap'n Chronic Cereal", claiming that these were medical marijuana infused products that were showing up on Colorado school grounds and being marketed to children. However the "Pot Tarts" photograph in the letter came from a DEA bust in California in 1986, and the "Cap'n Chronic Cereal" photograph was only a T-shirt design and was never documented to be a real product by anyone.

Not to be deterred by the facts, Rep. Acree continued the propaganda war and began the hearing by displaying boxes of these alleged "marijuana-infused products" that had been found on school yards in Colorado. However, upon closer inspection, it was determined that Rep. Acree had purchased several random food products at Target that morning and was parading them in front of the committee as if they were medical marijuana-infused products themselves.

During a full hour and a half of testimony from law enforcement, no one could produce an actual medicated "Pot Tart" or any medicated "Cap'n Chronic Cereal." The North Metro Drug Task Force, the Fraternal Order of Police, the Colorado District Attorney's Council, the County Sheriffs of Colorado, and the state Attorney General's office all testified about how medical marijuana was being marketed to and falling into the hands of children in Colorado school yards, but not one of these agencies could produce the actual menacing product itself.

Instead, Rep. Acree provided non-medicated products purchased from Target as hearing props, including Cap'n Crunch cereal made by Quaker Oats, Sparkling Lime Soda made by Izze of Boulder, Colorado, Crispy Marshmallow Bites made by Archer Farms (a Target brand), and Soakers Fruit Snacks made by Market Pantry (another Target brand). Who knows how the manufacturers of these products will react to Rep. Acree's attempts to link them with poisoning children with marijuana.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Very interesting post, Minotaur48. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Guest
Guest

"Rep. Acree at the beginning of the testimony brought out commercial products...she presented a box of Quaker Oats brand Capt. Crunch, Sparkling Lime Soda made by Izze of Boulder, CO, Crispy Marshmallow Bites and Soakers Fruit Snacks, both made by Target" -- I wonder what the corporations that manufacture these products think of Acree involving their brand names in scare tactics? The only thing tying these products to marijuana is Cindy Acree.

huh.
huh.

yes, is there any way to stop the blatant lies? when the truth is so easily accessible and they refuse to ignore the facts and lie directly to our faces is there anything that can be done?

Wanda James
Wanda James

Labeling, OK, i think it is good thing. We should know what is in products.

Confusion? None what so ever, since MMJ products can ONLY be purchased at a Dispsensary that sells nothing but MMJ. Target Shopper, you are correct...THERE IS NO PLACE IN AMERICA WHERE CANDY IS SOLD NEXT TO MMJ! OR EVEN A PLACE WHERE CHILDREN CAN SHOP AND SEE THE PRODUCT! SO WHERE IS THE CONFUSION?

Perhaps kids are more confused about thinking Oxycontin pills are Pez....Reefer Madness, in it's classic form.

One more point, where did the officer get the infused brownies? Is he an MMJ patient? Or was he testifying while on duty at tax payers expense? If the answer is neither, perhaps we need to investgate the officer and how HE got the brownies. Maybe he was confused at Target and bought the wrong ones?

Jim
Jim

Did you see that one of the Post's top headlines for the day was about an attempted robbery at a COLORADO SPRINGS dispensary (thought they were the DENVER Post) that was thwarted when the owner of the business, who invested in good surveillance equipment, saw the guys breaking in on his home monitor and reported it to police? The would be robbers were apprehended and brought to the station, nobody was injured, it happened at 1:30 am (in COLORADO SPRINGS, mind you) and the surveillance equipment worked as advertised, aiding in the apprehension of the suspects. In spite of everything, the Post spun the non-story into a negative headline regarding MMJ. I wonder why the Post isn't covering the string of bank and convenience store robberies in BOULDER, isn't that also their territory?

huh.
huh.

*refuse to acknowledge the truth and continue to ignore the facts- thats what was supposed to be in the above post. my bad.

Denver Relief
Denver Relief

The officer claimed these were items that were confiscated by police (on the playground) and given to him to present as evidence at the hearing. It was 2 medicated brownies (one for each hand), each in their own clear plastic container. I BELIEVE they were Nancy's Edibles brand.(http://www.cnbc.com/id/4058569...

Agree with you on the labeling. That was the main point of my testimony. The House Judiciary committee appeared to have no knowledge of the labeling standards in the proposed CMMC rules. I was given additional time to read the proposed rule, Regulation 43.3-904. Product Labeling, Substitution, Sampling and Analysis. Ideally, they will leave this part to the MMED who spent months working on the creation of rules for the CMMC.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Strong opinions, Jim. Thanks for reading and posting.

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