Top

blog

Stories

 

Penny Parker, Mike Littwin layoffs linked to YourHub changes at Post

Categories: Media

dacia johnson.jpg
Dacia Johnson.
Update: The Denver Post's decisions to lay off newsroom stars Penny Parker and Mike Littwin, and end Chuck Murphy's metro column, have gotten a lot of attention from folks tracking changes at the paper; get details below. But another person lost her job, too: Dacia Johnson, 23, who worked for YourHub, a community journalism project that, like Littwin and Parker, has roots in the defunct Rocky Mountain News.

YourHub was launched by the Rocky in 2005, and in a Message column from that year linked here, John Temple, the tabloid's editor, described it in positively altruistic terms. "We can fulfill a role of helping to connect the community," he said. "Readers will be able to share their lives -- and we're giving them a platform to do it."

Of course, the concept was also seen as a profit engine -- a way of corralling dollars that otherwise would have gone to then-bustling neighborhood and community newspapers with zoned editions largely filled with user-generated copy that cost little or nothing. And over time, YourHub proved to be quite a sturdy offering, surviving the death of the Rocky and becoming a Post staple. In an August 2009 item headlined "YourHub.com: A local-media success story," I wrote, "YourHub still isn't a must-read -- at least for me. But I can imagine plenty of other folks finding the paper and its web component to be useful, informative and enjoyable. It's not the journalistic revolution Temple implied, but the paper/site has carved out an old-fashioned place for itself in the new-media marketplace."

a GEDC0001.jpg
A YourHub edition from 2009.
YourHub has also served as an entry point for new recruits into the journalism industry, with Johnson, a community manager for the operation, serving as a perfect example.

"The community manager position was a brand new position when I started six months ago," she notes via e-mail. "Five of us were hired for this position (all young, I was the youngest. I am only 23. This was my first job out of school. I graduated from Metro State in May 2011).

"I was the only one of the five of us laid off due to the fact that I was the last one hired," she adds, "though we were all hired within weeks of each other."

An open community journalist position at YourHub is also being eliminated, as editor Greg Moore pointed out in a memo to staff on view below.

Regarding the layoff, Johnson concedes that "I'm sad. This was my first job and I was completely blindsided by the news." She's also "concerned for my fellow YourHub community managers. I thought we were doing great things with YourHub, increasing page views and getting more user generated content to our sites."

The problem, of course, is figuring out how to monetize all those clicks, and it's one that still hasn't been solved despite the Herculean efforts of newspaper execs for the past couple of decades at least. In the meantime, though, young journalists like Johnson -- the lifeblood of the profession, and the best way for it to stay relevant into the future -- are finding it tougher and tougher to get their foot in the door, and to stay inside once they're granted entrance.

One more thing: At the bottom of Chuck Murphy's column today, he appended the following: "This is my last column. I have been called back into management to work behind the scenes on The Post's burgeoning social-media efforts. But our conversations can continue at facebook.com/denverpost, facebook.com/Cmurphydenpost, on a soon-to-be established blog and at twitter.com/cmurphydenpost. Thanks."

Look below to see our earlier coverage.

Greg Moore.
Update, 11:56 a.m. March 22: Just heard from Denver Post editor Greg Moore regarding our interview request following the layoffs of Penny Parker and Mike Littwin, the end of Chuck Murphy's column and other changes at the paper. He didn't answer our questions in detail, but he didn't sugarcoat money woes or the unpleasantness associated with downsizing.

Speculation is rife that the cuts at the Post were made at the behest of the paper's creditors; MediaNews Group, the paper's parent company, emerged from bankruptcy two years ago this week with a reported debt level of $165 million. Moore has no knowledge of such an edict, but he does stress that the changes were financially motivated.

"It's strictly about the money, it's strictly a budget issue," he says. "Our expenses are out of line and our overall performance is not good."

He adds that "company-wide, there are a number of expense-control measures being taken, and unfortunately, they involve people. And it's never good when that happens."

We've also heard from multiple sources that Murphy, who has only been a columnist for a few months after spending the previous eight years in editorial roles, might have been laid off under a last hired-first hired provision had the columnist position not been eliminated. He'll now work as a social media editor.

To that, Moore offers no comment. But he does stress that "I respect the [Denver Newspaper] Guild and I try to operate within the framework of our agreement. And with their cooperation, we've been able to do a lot of things over the ten years I've been here. I'm not looking for fights."

Continue reading for our previous coverage.

chuck murphy facebook photo.jpg
Chuck Murphy.
Update: Yesterday, news broke that the Denver Post had laid off two big names, Penny Parker and Mike Littwin; for details, read our original item below. In an interview yesterday morning, also seen here, Parker told us to expect more changes, and she was right. A member of the YourHub staff has also been laid off, and new metro columnist Chuck Murphy is being returned to a mostly behind-the-scenes role according to an internal memo we're sharing.

Murphy spent eight years as an editor, most recently under the title of public affairs team leader, prior to the December announcement that he would become a metro columnist in tandem with veteran scribe Tina Griego; his first piece didn't appear until several weeks afterward. Now, however, Murphy will give up the column he's only been penning for a short time to serve as social media editor.

Also gone is YourHub community manager Dacia Johnson, and an open position in the YourHub operation has been eliminated.

We've placed an interview request with Post editor Greg Moore. When and if he responds, we'll update this piece. In the meantime, here's Moore's memo describing the layoffs of Parker, Littwin and Johnson, as well as other changes. That's followed by our earlier coverage.

Colleagues: I regret to have to report developments that you may have already heard. Because of the company's difficult financial situation, we have had to make tough budget cuts that include the layoff of columnists Penny Parker and Mike Littwin. Obviously, this was done strictly to meet budget cuts. It is no reflection on them personally or professionally. Both of them have contributed mightily since joining The Post after the closing of The Rocky Mountain News three years ago. I appreciate everything they have done. I wish it didn't have to happen. We will all miss them.

In addition, we have had to make cuts in the YourHub staff, laying off community manager Dacia Johnson, who has been a key contributor since joining the operation in September. We also are eliminating an open Community Journalist position in YourHub.

It is important to know that reductions are happening in every division at The Post in an effort to cut expenses and improve our performance. You will be hearing more about these challenges in coming days. I had hoped to have a chance to explain some of this before it seeped out, but personnel issues are delicate.

Chuck Murphy will be rejoining the exempt ranks as Social Media editor working with our growing social media team, which is so critical to our continued digital growth. Chuck will work with Dan Petty, who has taken on greater responsibilities with Digital First Media. The move is effective April 1. During Chuck's brief stint as a metro columnist, he did a wonderful job bringing to the fore critical issues and delightful diversions in the metro area. But given the tough choices we are making it is better to turn his considerable talents to these other pressing issues.

Tina Griego, who has for much of the past year shouldered the responsibility of being our sole columnist, will do so again bringing to our readers her fresh perspective and urgent reporting on underserved communities.

This is a difficult time for us all, but we will get through it. Thanks for your support and understanding.

Greg

penny parker photo 1.JPG
Penny Parker.
Update, 9:47 a.m. March 21: Earlier today, I reported that the Denver Post has laid off two of its most prominent staffers, Penny Parker and Mike Littwin; see our original post below. Shortly thereafter, I was able to reach Parker, who was blindsided by this unexpected move and still struggling to process it. From what she hears, though, more big changes at the paper could be on the way, and soon.

"Apparently, more is coming down today," Parker says.

To put it mildly, Parker didn't see the layoff coming. "Kick me in the head, seriously. I knew nothing, nothing. My poor, 33-year-old boss" -- business editor Kristi Arellano -- "had to tell me. I feel really bad for her. This is not what she signed on for."

She adds that "I would have expected Greg Moore," the Post's editor, "to have called me. He didn't, and I'm disappointed."

Why does she believe she was let go? "I'm extraneous," she replies. "If you look at newspapers that still have a business columnist, well, they can be axed." She's a member of the Denver Newspaper Guild, and while she hadn't spoken to a union representative prior to our conversation, she suspects that she was vulnerable under a last hired-first fired provision.

Parker stresses that she has "no bitterness" against the paper. "I will forever love the Post, but I'm sad about my own situation. They had to do what they had to do. I don't feel like this hugely high-paid person that they had to let go of. But it's a business decision. I wouldn't want to make those decisions." And despite previous thinning of the staff via buyouts, she believes the paper has continued to publish good work: "We've been doing more stories that have connected with real people, on a really personal level. I really applaud the Post for that."

A lot has changed in the three years since she and other star attractions at the Rocky Mountain News were brought to the Post immediately after the Rocky's closure -- a move accompanied by a great deal of hoopla.

"I thought we were brought over to add a personality to the paper that they thought was missing -- because I thought the Rocky had that personality, that connection to the public," Parker notes. "So they brought us over to help them make the paper a little more personable for their audience. And now I'm gone -- and I am, in a word, devastated.

"I never sought out to be Penny Parker Incorporated," she allows. "I never thought I would be anything other than a reporter. Then I was elevated to the job I got at the Rocky" -- as an around-the-town columnist -- "and then I came to the Post, and Greg Moore invented my job," which combined her previous style with business-and-restaurant focus.

Right now, the response to the news on her Facebook page and via other social media outlets is helping her cope with the situation. "When I went through cancer, I could not believe the outpouring of kindness, and the support people gave me. I never knew it was there. And I am more than grateful for anyone who's going to miss me. How could I not be grateful? I'm the luckiest human being on the planet. That's how I feel. I had the time of my life."

Look below to read our previous coverage.

Original item, 6:36 a.m. March 21: Following the February 2009 closure of the Rocky Mountain News, the Denver Post hired a handful of high-profile Rocky scribes. Three years later, many of them are gone, including metro columnist Bill Johnson and sports expert Dave Krieger.

The latest? Sources say business scribe Penny Parker and columnist Mike Littwin, two of the paper's biggest names, have been laid off.

Parker, who prides herself on breaking stories, did so in regard to her own departure from the Post, tweeting the following:

She also shared the development on her Facebook page, prompting messages of dismay from a slew of notable Denver names and PR types.

mike littwin facebook photo.jpg
Mike Littwin's Facebook profile photo.
No wonder. Parker, who wrote an around-the-town column for the Rocky, adapted her style to fit the Business section upon her arrival at the Post, but she still fit in plenty of news about happenings and Denver celebs. Bill Husted, her colleague at the Post, did likewise. However, Husted took a buyout from the Post late last year, more or less ceding the beat to Parker -- temporarily, as it turns out.

As for Littwin, he was moved from the main section of the paper to the editorial page in early 2011. The lower-profile nature of this spot couldn't help diminishing his impact to some degree. But he remained a must-read for anyone interested in current events here and nationally, even for those infuriated by his progressive slant.

Could other layoffs or staffing changes be in the works? We've requested an interview with Post editor Greg Moore, as well as with Littwin; when and if they respond, or if we get more information from other sources, we'll update this item. In the meantime, it appears the Post braintrust believes that those Rocky lovers who subscribed to the surviving paper in order to keep up with their favorites won't bail even if those writers are gone. Or perhaps those readers have already moved on.

Follow and like the Michael Roberts/Westword Facebook page.

More from our Media archive: "Denver Post yanks Doonesbury, Peanuts and few readers complain -- so far."


Advertisement

My Voice Nation Help
241 comments
Bobshook
Bobshook

The reason I've subscribed to the Post is, first of all, because I no longer had the option of reading Rocky Mountain News. Secondly, I read the Post primarily for access to Mike Littwin's and Bill Johnson's articles. The lay offs of these inciteful writers leaves me with no reason to read the newspaper. I am extremely disappointed that the Post decided to remove these journalists in their 'big changes'. These particular changes are a great disappointment to me as a regular reader.... enough to make me cancel my subscription. 

spy equipment
spy equipment

I have never seen such impressive ideas presented in writing. Your writer has a very unique way of presenting information in such a way as to catch the reader's attention. http://www.spygadgets4u.co.uk/

Grammyk456
Grammyk456

Miss Mike Littwin. He was very funny. Where did he go?

Mencken30
Mencken30

Blame Denver/Colorado residents....Fewer and fewer people--especially the young--want to pay for the news; they want it free on the Internet, and are, like, blissfully oblivious to the terrible consequences. So were left with a bunch of blogging amateurs as "journalists," while real writers with expertise and experience get laid off. Who's going to be doing the investigative reporting and hard journalism? Practically no one. The local TV stations lead their newscasts with stories about cats stuck in trees and dumb, happy-talk anchors getting bit in the face by dogs.

Meanwhile, the once-decent Denver Post has been emaciated and gutted, reduced to bare-bones wire services and a bloated sports section with overpaid, blowhard columnists like Woody Paige that cover the mediocre Broncos 24/7, far more than national or world news. The so-called arts section has also been wrecked, and now mostly caters to readers who are mainly interested in power work-outs, hip restaurants and the latest recipes. It's just a daily 5280.

If we're going to to save newspapers and the professional journalism in general, we need to get them out of the hands of greedy, bottom-line corporations and into the hands of non-profits, perhaps using the model of public radio and television. In the meantime, readers, why don't you try paying for the news, instead of just mooching off the Internet?

Mencken30
Mencken30

Blame Denver/Colorado residents....Fewer and fewer people--especially the young--want to pay for the news; they want it free on the Internet, and are, like, blissfully oblivious to the terrible consequences. So were left with a bunch of blogging amateurs as "journalists," while real writers with expertise and experience get laid off. Who's going to be doing the investigative reporting and hard journalism? Practically no one. The local TV stations lead their newscasts with stories about cats stuck in trees and dumb, happy-talk anchors getting bit in the face by dogs.

Meanwhile, the once-decent Denver Post has been emaciated and gutted, reduced to bare-bones wire services and a bloated sports section with overpaid blowhard columnists like Woody Paige that cover the mediocre Broncos 24/7, far more than national or world news. Its so-called arts section has also been wrecked, and now mostly caters to readers who are mainly interested in power work-outs, hip restaurants and the latest recipes. It's just a daily 5280.

If we're going to to save newspapers and professional journalism in general, we need to get them out of the hands of greedy, bottom-line corporations and into the hands of non-profits, perhaps using the model of public radio and television. In the meantime, readers, why don't you try paying for the news, instead of just mooching off the Internet?

Mencken30
Mencken30

Blame Denver/Colorado residents....Fewer and fewer people--especially the young--want to pay for the news; they want it free on the Internet, and are, like, blissfully oblivious to the terrible consequences. So were left with a bunch of blogging amateurs as "journalists," while real writers with expertise and experience get laid off. Who's going to be doing the investigative reporting and hard, pound-the-pavement journalism? Practically no one. The local TV stations lead their newscasts with stories about cats stuck in trees and dumb, happy-talk anchors getting bit in the face by dogs. Radio is a bastion of right-wing demagogues, even at the moderate KOA.

Meanwhile, the Denver Post has been emaciated and gutted, reduced to bare-bones wire services and a bloated sports section with overpaid, blowhard columnists like Woody Paige that cover the mediocre Broncos 24/7, far more than national or world news. Its so-called arts section has also been wrecked, and now caters to readers who are mainly interested in power work-outs, trendy restaurants and the latest salsa recipes. It's just a daily 5280.

If we're going to to save newspapers and professional journalism in general, we need to get them out of the hands of greedy, bottom-line corporations and into the hands of non-profits, perhaps using the model of public radio and television. In the meantime, readers, why don't you trying paying for the news, instead of just mooching off the Internet?

Mencken30
Mencken30

Blame Denver/Colorado residents....Fewer and fewer people--especially the young--want to pay for the news; they want it free on the Internet, and are, like, blissfully oblivious to the terrible consequences. So were left with a bunch of blogging amateurs as "journalists," while real writers with expertise and experience get laid off. Who's going to be doing the investigative reporting and hard journalism? Practically no one. The local TV stations lead their newscasts with stories about cats stuck in trees and dumb, happy-talk anchors getting bit in the face by dogs. Meanwhile, the once-decent Denver Post has been emaciated and gutted, reduced to bare-bones wire services and a bloated sports section with overpaid columnists like Woody Paige that cover the mediocre Broncos 24/7, far more than national or world news. The so-called arts section has also been wrecked, and now mostly caters to readers who are mainly interested in power work-outs, hip restaurants and the latest recipes.

If we're going to to save newspapers and the professional journalism in general, we need to get them out of the hands of greedy, bottom-line corporations and into the hands of non-profits, perhaps using the model of public radio and television. In the meantime, folks, why don't you trying paying for the news, instead of just mooching off the Internet?

colorado disability lawyer
colorado disability lawyer

 The budget proposal now must be approved by Congress. It is about a 10 percent increase over the last VA budget.

The VA must balance their budget while caring for the needs of soldiers returning from more than 10 years of war in the Middle East with the agency's commitments to veterans from previous conflicts.

Guest
Guest

I'm surprised Michael apparently missed the John Temple story. While the Post rearranges deck chairs, Temple has been hired by one of the most prestigious newspapers on the planet.

newsmom
newsmom

...wish i could be the genie who divines how to stanch the bleeding of talent and institutional memory from newspapers everywhere.  Here;s wishing Penny and Mike all the best. It's probably difficult to see now, but there is life after the DP. They're both smart and talented. A door has closed, but a window will open.

MartinW
MartinW

The Denver Post isn't worth reading. They should just shut it down and put it out of its misery. Much of their reporting is fiction and slanted to validate the programmed ignorance of the head-in-the-sand crowd. Reporters at DP with any semblance of journalistic integrity are not long employed there.

I get most of my local news fairly directly from first-hand reports on blogs, local websites, and other media. Sure, a lot of blogs post nonsense but others earn their credibility with consistently accurate reporting. Social media stands a good chance of supplanting traditional TV news and press entirely. Unlike TV and the DP, bullshit in social media is fairly easy to detect because the posters usually don't have the resources (as does Fox News, ABC, CBS, etc.) to dress it up.

If I want world news, PBS WV has programs from other countries that provide more complete and accurate coverage of our country than our own domestic propaganda outlets...er, excuse me...I meant to say mainstream media. RT (Russia Today) provides excellent reporting on US politics but gets its knees bloody when talking about Vladimir Putin.

I propose a global program to exchange news where we only watch news reports about us that come from other countries. We'd get all our national news from Iran and Russia. In exchange we'd broadcast news about Iran to Iran. China gets its news from Japan. Japan gets its news from Korea. And so forth.

Then we might actually get the straight scoop about what all our leaders are doing today to screw us.

Vic
Vic

Hey Mikey, the Post's "Viva" also just took a major hit

Jengra
Jengra

Mike Littwin's column was a must read when he was with the Rocky Mountain News and one of the reasons I became a Post customer when the Rocky disappeared.  His was the first column I read.  I had a great appreciation for his insight, humor, and introspection.  I will miss him.  I may cancel my subscription.  Littwin and DOONESBURY  were two of the main reasons for reading the Post.  With Littwin gone and DOONESBURY censored, why bother?  

Dan C
Dan C

Media is contracting for many reasons. I spent two hours in a Colorado Springs library last autumn watching a documentary put out by 1,500 metallurgical, chemical and structural engineers, architects and military explosives experts who said over and over the laws of physics show the towers came down from a controlled demolition.  A fired professor Jones from BYU found traces of the miltary grade thermite at the site - that's the stuff that melts metal and was the cause of the molten metal squuring out of the lower levels of the tower as it free fell into its footprint.  The Post, the dead Rocky and other dying papers just regurgitate canned releases and parrot their "inside" sources.  Even libraries are now an alternative to the controlled media. 

American
American

Bring back Mike and get rid of Tina Griego. One more poor mexican article and I'll puke. Then I will end my subscription to the Post.

confused!
confused!

They keep Chuck Murphy who gets more negative reader comments about his lack of objectivity, his lack of research, and his general lack of knowing what's going on in Colorado than any other writer at the Post but sack Penny Parker who was one of the most plugged in, scoop getting business writer the Post had who gets generally nothing but positive enthusiastic reader comments...

Now why on earth would they promote someone back to management (Chuck Murphy) who never gets a scoop and has nothing but bad reader reviews and sack someone who embodied the essence of what a good business reporter is (Penny Parker)WEIRD

RichardT
RichardT

Okay so we know it was all about the money, but it would helpful to know exactly how much money are we talking about here? How much do columnists like Littwin and Parker actually make? The numbers are important to put all this in perspective, yet they are not mentioned anywhere. Are we talking $100K? $125K? $75K? More, less, what? I have to admit I have no idea what these jobs would pay. I can imagine it doesn't take Littwin more than an hour or two of actual work to crank out three columns a week. He can probably do it in his sleep. So how much is that effort really worth? Should his compensation be based on how hard he works, or how many papers the Post can incrementally sell with his columns? I don't know. In the grand scheme of things, being let go from the Post is small potatoes compared to losing the starting QB job on the Broncos, a much higher profile gig. Tebow took his dismissal with class and optimism, so let's hope Mike and Penny can do the same, and view this career change as opening a new chapter in their lives, like Tim has. Good luck.

Dave
Dave

So glad Littwin is gone but that's just a personal thing I can't stand his brand of writing, in his eyes everyone on the left is a victim and everyone on the right is a Nazi.  The DP can surely do better than that.  I have to wonder as someone who commutes by the brand new fancy building that houses Media Newsgroup and the Denver Post has anything to do with the financial problems, although i realize the availability of free news on the internet is a big part.  Just another buggy whip manufacturer perhaps?

Jon
Jon

Congratulations Greg Moore. You've turned the Post into a meaningless shell of itself and gotten rid of your best writer and the only liberal voice on the editorial staff. Do you even have any local reporters anymore? If I want to read reposts from out of town papers I can go online. Why not just shut down the whole paper and get it over with because that's where you seem to be headed.   

davebarnes
davebarnes

I enjoy reading the print version of YourHub.However, YourHub.com is a vast desert wasteland. Check the traffic stats on Alexa. Pathetic.

Bill
Bill

If it's strictly a "budget issue," why is a sports online person about to be hired? Shouldn't as many cuts be made that can be? Or is this just a convenient out?

Mnthouse2012
Mnthouse2012

As the Denver Post loses all its writing talent, it continues to maintain a bloated topheavy corporate staff, with a cast of seemingly thousands of Directors all making $100K or more, VPs and SVPs making more than $200k a year. Why do they keep all these stiffs while laying off all the reporters? 

Joe
Joe

I'm not surprised that you would take this opportunity to get rid of one of the few liberal voices on your staff. Now Carroll, Harsanyi and Rosen will have free rein in the editorial pages.  This is enough for me to cancel after subscribing after 20 years.  This is the kind of crap that happens when big medial takes over.  Hooray for Citizens United!  "Drown those liberals!".

Joe, long time subscriber gives up

Donkey Hotay
Donkey Hotay

The entire content and production of The Post could be outsourced to India, where news-aggregating software and cheap human labor -- with better command of the English language -- could produce the rag for 1/10 its current costs.

Adapt or perish.

HTH.

Trina
Trina

Why is Westword so obsessed with three people getting laid off?

Vic
Vic

A copy editor was also laid off. The fact that Greg Moore didn't even consider that worth mentioning is quite telling.

Retiree
Retiree

The vitriol being leveled at Mike is a testament to his value at the Post. Even people who hate him read his columns. I didn't read all the columnists, but Littwin was the only one I knew who responded to people commenting on his columns with his own posts. Needless to say, we're discontinuing the Post.

In my view, the Post has two vital roles to play. It should provide a soapbox for local opinion providing viewpoints for all sides of issues. It also has a valuable investigative role to play in exposing wrongdoing and various abuses of power. With the silencing of Littwin, the former role has taken a serious blow. It's only a matter of time that the paper will cease to exist, thus taking the latter role -- a much more important one -- away.

Sad. We're discontinuing our subscription today.

BurningBrule
BurningBrule

Heard Parker on the Caplis & Silverman show last night.  She sounded/acted like a petulant teenager.  Goodbye to Littwin; a stringy-haired hippy still stuck in the '60's.  Maybe the Occupy movement has a paid spokesman opening for him.

Greg Moore's Balls
Greg Moore's Balls

Here's what happened.  Littwin's contract should have allowed him to take over Chuck Murphy's role if the Post decided to take him off the editorial page. Littwin's official title in his contract was "Cityside" columnist.  He had drinks with Greg Moore last week, and basically told him that he couldn't be laid off, because his contract would have allowed him to go back to his original position.  The way the Denver Post got around this was eliminating Chuck Murphy's role and in doing so was able to eliminate Littwin.  Ending Murphy's column was simply collateral damage.  Sleazy, creepy and cold blooded.  Littwin's biggest mistake was reminding Greg Moore of this....it got the ball rolling for management to figure out how to get rid of Littwin.    If they had tried to lay off Littwin without eliminating Murphy's column, Littwin could have walked into Singleton's office with his attorney and Greg Moore's balls on a platter.

milehiboy
milehiboy

I'm betting all sports columnists are safe, which is a sad reflection of our society as whole

monicam
monicam

I'm going to miss Littwin - his insight and reason was a treat and it seems the Post is retreating from progressive political commentary....a sad fact.

Sid
Sid

too bad Temple and Scripps couldn't run a tight ship financially, or else the rocky might still be around. maybe the WP has money to burn

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Interesting post, Martin. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

AlCum
AlCum

 There was no "thermite" military grade or otherwise found at the WTC site. Controlled demolition of those towers is a physical impossibility given what was plainly observed. It's obvious what brought them down: Plane crashes, impact damage, uncontrolled fires, weakened steel supports and floor struts, and then the massive weight falling onto the floors below. This isn't difficult to grasp.

Guest
Guest

 Racist much? Thought so.

News Wire
News Wire

The heavy-handed and arbitrary censorship from the online moderators didn't help attract online discussion.

Guest
Guest

 The fact that you ask that question, Trina, shows you really have no grasp of the larger issues here. Do some homework, then come back.

AlCum
AlCum

Why are you commenting on it?

C.J.
C.J.

 Exactly. He was the best writer in that newsroom. This was a) clearing the books and b) getting rid of former Rocky people. Greg Moore did it in January when he basically fired Dave Krieger.

ANT
ANT

And the lesson it, don't exercise your leverage until you have to.

C.J.
C.J.

 Moves like that have happened many times before at the Post. They did it a decade ago when they "promoted" someone in sports to a management role (to get him out of union protection) just to fire him.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

We're still hoping to interview Greg Moore about these and related reports. Thanks for the post.

AlCum
AlCum

The way I understood it, the Post was actually in worse financial shape but as a private company with its local owner in Singleton, was more willing to absorb losses and fight it out. Scripps, a publicly traded company in Cincinnati with a track record of closing papers rather than take losses for shareholders, pulled the plug when it determined Denver would take too long to turn around to profitability.

Remember, Singleton took the parent company into Chapter 11 right after the News closed, and lenders now call the shots.

Dan C
Dan C

Obviously you did not watch the two hour movie or see the evidence and hear the informed scientific opinions of professional metallurgical, structural and chemical engineers.  Do you get all your info from guvmint handouts regurgitated by controlled media?  These engineers put their reputations on the line, citing over and over "the laws of physics". Go ask fired Professor Jones from BTU what he found.  Go look at the raw CNN footage of the Pentagon as I have and look and look for a plane that is not there.  Basic research on your own is not that difficult. 

AlCum
AlCum

They only brought on some former Rocky people in order to try to retain the readership as they transitioned Rocky subscriptions over to the Post. They stated this at the time. Guess it didn't work.

Guest
Guest

 So Dan, where was Penny Parker the day the towers came down? I think you're on to something!

AlCum
AlCum

Obviously you're not familiar with the laws of physics and the utter impossibility of "controlled demolition" and super-cartoon-magic ninja "thermite." Thermite is physically incapable of producing what occurred on 9/11. These "engineers" risked their reputations and lost. It's painfully obvious what happened on 9/11: gravity collapse following crash impact and fires and weakened steel supports. The complete lack of any controlled demolition explosions itself makes the claims physically impossible.

A plane is not at the Pentagon? Surely you're not serious. The plane parts were recovered there, both black boxes, substantial debris from the craft itself, and more importantly body parts from all of the passengers and crew including the hijackers were recovered and identified. How on earth did they get there, in your view? Did Cheney and Rumsfeld walk unobtrusively through the crowd dropping them from their pants pockets?

Please, get real.

Now Trending

Denver Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

Loading...