Metro State College's tuition plan for illegals could teach the country a lesson

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Congress won't pass the DREAM act and the Colorado Legislature killed ASSET. But Metropolitan State College (soon to be Metropolitan State University of Denver) is ready to do the right thing for would-be students who are living here illegally, kids who were brought to this country by their parents years ago and now consider Colorado home. Their only home.

Until now, any undocumented students attending Metro have been charged out-of-state tuition -- even if they've lived in Colorado long enough to qualify as a state resident, even if they've graduated from a Colorado high school. But at 9 a.m. this morning, the nine members of Metro's board of trustees will vote on a proposal to create a new tuition category, one that would charge a qualified, undocumented student $6,716 a year in tuition -- compared to $15,985 a year for out-of-state students and $4,304 for regular in-state tuition.

Like ASSET, the proposal would prohibit any state aid or subsidies going to the undocumented students.

Unlike ASSET, this deal looks like it's going through.

The issue has been debated for a decade; in 2004, our cover story "Head of the Class" laid out the dilemma facing Pablo, a star student at West High School who was undocumented, which meant his future options were limited.

Metro started exploring the possibility of a new tuition category for undocumented students after ASSET stalled in the Colorado legislature. School officials argue that it's a wise investment in this state's future -- and they're right.

Any day now, the Supreme Court will release its decision on the Arizona law that requires police officers to verify the immigration status of anyone they stop, anyone they want to stop. But in the meantime, Metro could teach the rest of the country a lesson in how to truly make America a land of opportunity.

Will the Supreme Court uphold Arizona's SB 1070? Click to read the Michael Lacey article "America's war on Mexicans has gone too far."


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12 comments
blah blah blah
blah blah blah

Welcome to "Cali"rado!  We can now kiss this state goodbye and begin the ascension...

Phatcow2
Phatcow2

Ozzy, could you please explain why after 17 years you are still "undocumented" (illegal)? I understand you wanting to educate yourself but a college degree won't help if you can't get a job. Most jobs that require degrees require you to be a legal citizen or have proper work papers.

Michael Roberts
Michael Roberts

Thanks for the post, Ozzy. We're going to make it an upcoming Comment of the Day. Congrats.

Ozzy Katt00
Ozzy Katt00

KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK METRO!!! I'M ONE OF MANY UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS THAT HAVE LIVED IN COLORADO FOR 17 YEARS AND WOULD REALLY LOVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO PROGRESS IN MY EDUCATION! GOOD JOB, GOD BLESS ALL YOUR HARD WORK AND INTEREST METRO!!!

Brax Lopez
Brax Lopez

Much love from AZ.  Go Metropolitan State !! 

Cecilia Clare
Cecilia Clare

"Illegals" is not a politically sensitive term. "Undocumented" is the preferred term. 

Bob Smith
Bob Smith

It's nice to see Metro honoring the circumstances of its founding with this action. This alum is in full support.

Caroleeeeeena
Caroleeeeeena

For many undocumented immigrants, current immigration policy makes it impossible to become legalized if one enters the country “without authorization.” For example, according to the visa bulletin published by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs, if a Mexican-born 8-year-old child arrives in the United States with his or her parents and the family files a petition for permanent legal residency on the basis of one parent having a sibling who is an American citizen, the petition would take 18 years to be processed, at which time the child would be 26, and no longer eligible for benefits since he/she is not a child under 21.

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