Amendment 64's Brian Vicente spreading state's medical marijuana message to Massachusetts

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After the passage of Amendment 64, opportunities abounded for its main proponents, Mason Tvert and Brian Vicente. But while Tvert said he had no immediate plans to spread the gospel about the measure to other states, despite being invited to do so in California by HBO's Bill Maher, Vicente is branching out, opening a law office in Massachusetts, which just legalized medical marijuana. And he'll be in the state tonight for an MMJ event.

"We're doing a free seminar," Vicente notes. The topic revolves around Question 3, the MMJ initiative approved by Massachusetts voters earlier this month; see the full text below. In Vicente's words, "we'll address what it means for patients, what it means for caregivers, and ultimately what it means for potential business owners."

The new office of Vicente Sederberg, LLC, is based in the Boston area, with Shaleen Title the attorney who'll be based there full time. Here's a video featuring Title:

Vicente decided to head east due in large part to the approval of Question 3, which he knows from the inside out. "I was actually consulted on the language," he says, "and we feel like the language is quite strong. It's closer to a one-size-fits-all medical marijuana law that allows patients to use marijuana and also allows a limited number of stores to be set up...35 to start, and additional stores can be added as the population demands."

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Brian Vicente.
Another advantage of Question 3, from Vicente's perspective, is that it allows the use of medical marijuana "for any condition doctors feel is appropriate. And that includes post-traumatic stress disorder."

This mention isn't coincidental. Vicente has lobbied for PTSD to be added to Colorado's medical marijuana regulations as a condition that can be treated by MMJ -- but his entreaties have been rejected by the state Board of Health, which must approve additions to the approved list. That's not the case in Massachusetts, though. "The power is in the doctor's hands," Vicente says.

The result, he believes, offers the best of both MMJ worlds -- "a California-style model in terms of being open-ended about what patient conditions qualify, with a Colorado-style regulatory structure. So I think it's a really strong law."

Although Vicente will be splitting his time between Colorado and Massachusetts, at least in the short run, he stresses that "my primary focus will be on the implementation of Amendment 64." However, he goes on, "we saw a real opportunity to spread the Colorado model of medical marijuana in Massachusetts for patients and business owners."

Continue for information about tonight's free seminar in Massachusetts, as well as the complete text of Question 3.


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24 comments
Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

Of course, the CDHPE won't be able to stop PTSD patients in a few weeks, however, they'll still risk plenty of trouble from the VA, if they're veterans and expect medical services, from what I hear.

Connie Megel Long
Connie Megel Long

Yes, it's just a matter of time before its passed at a federal level.

drraycambodia
drraycambodia

Thanks and blessings to the wonderful Brian Vicente,Mason Tvert & Ms Shaleen Title...you have helped change the world. Please put the petal to the metal these next few years.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

So now that lyin' Brian Vicente has dropped the festering turd A64 into the Colorado Constitution, he's off to find other fools and tools stupid enough to implement similar bogus, ineffective and dysfunctional scams in other states?

Good Fucking Riddance!

Don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out, you lying bald-headed fuck-knuckle.

CoreyDonahue
CoreyDonahue

THIS IS NOT JOURNILISM!!! This is an advertisment for a law firm.  Michael what is the state doing with this new Constitutional amendment?  And won´t we have to change the Constitution of Colorado, just like we did, if we really want to legalize cannabis? So, to legalize cannabis in Colorado, because you constantly said it was legalization, and becasue you are a poor journilist, we will have to gather 86,000 more signatures and vote on legalization again in a general election.  But hey 1oz scraps that will stand just like Medical Marijuana was unconstitutionally regulated away, did you report on the blue sky rulling?  Keep telling your self Westword, you have journilists and are a real source of information, I am sure if you say it enough it will come true. The Campagin to Regulate Marijuana Like Alochol, except we are going to regulate it like Medical Marijuana.

Stephen At Half Aspen
Stephen At Half Aspen

But...but...but...how will we fill those prison beds? You can't expect the marginally-educated and under-paid correctional officers staffing most of our 30+ prisons to actually guard the really bad guys do you? We could actually have to close a prison or two (gasp) and that's unacceptable. The frightening thing is where will they get the bodies to fill the space? You can bet they will.

tutonehcc
tutonehcc topcommenter

Why waste time with the 'medical marijuana' Brian?  That shit was just stupid in Colorado.  Colorado used mmj as a stepping stone to real legalization which makes more sense because everyone can get legally high, not just patients.  'Medical marijuana' is dead in Colorado and shouldn't be promoted in other States.  Just go right to legalization which is what the people really want.  No one wants to go to a doctor, register with the State, etc.... Any worthwhile marijuana must come from capitalism, not non-profit.  There is no incentive to produce fine cannabis, and the general public don't but the 'medical marijuana' scam anymore.  Let's use our limited resources to legalize cannabis, not medical marijuana.

Juan_Leg
Juan_Leg

Doesn't this guy look like one of Patrick Sullivan's victims ?

IcePick
IcePick

If Vicente wrote this why is it that Massachusetts requires centers to be non-profit unlike our system?

Mitch Siff
Mitch Siff

Cololrado coincidentally was also the first state to repeal alcohol prohibition and then it spread to other states.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@charlottesodetani   "Did you know that there’s a station in Denver that only plays songs about dope?"

It's called Rap "music" ... been around for a while.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident  ... the CDPHE can't stop them now ... they've been using under the "decriminalized" recreational statute that's been in place for 35+ years now.

Too bad that A64 throws ALL PTSD Veterans under the legal bus who happen to be under twenty one years old -- old enough to serve and get maimed for the country, but not worthy of ANY legal protections under A64 according to the scumbags who wrote, promoted and voted for it.

A64 = Epic Fail.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@KathleenChippi 

*** Federal Grand Jury Digs Into Mendocino Marijuana Growers ***

Maybe it's the helicopters flying overhead from April to November, or maybe it's their cash crop. Whatever it is, marijuana growers love rumors. And a big one -- that the United States attorney had convened a grand jury, and was poking around state-legal medical cannabis operations, looking for crimes to prosecute -- has turned out to be true.

A federal grand jury has subpoenaed the Mendocino County sheriff, requesting all records related to the sheriff's defunct marijuana licensing program, according to the Ukiah Journal.

Growers paid the sheriff up to $6,500 to license and inspect their gardens, which were then marked as legal with zip ties. They also registered their address and their GPS coordinates, one grower told SF Weekly. All that information will soon be in the hands of United States Attorney Melinda Haag.

*** Government Regulation and Registration WORKS !! ***

rosskarr
rosskarr

@CoreyDonahue

It seems like the only folks who have a voice anymore are these marijuana lawyers. They get all the recognition even if they are doing wrong.

tutonehcc
tutonehcc topcommenter

@CoreyDonahue I tend to think of Westword as entertainment with a hint of journalism.  It keeps the news entertaining I guess.  No matter what gets reported on pot anyways, the news can change in a day which is why there is so much to be written about involving cannabis.  Cannabis has brought out the best, brought out the worst, but most important brought us all together.  Let's all get high and have fun!

Monkey
Monkey

@tutonehcc Vicente has made all his money off MMJ, charging people to tell them what to do, then defending them when they do it. As far as he is concerned, MMJ is his roots and it's spreading, and he's got to cash in while he can. If he goes straight for legalization, he would be the first, we don't even have legalization after 12 years of MMJ. As for non-profits, they are capitalism at its finest. The trick is to create a "management" company, that can make a profit, to manage the non-profit. All the money the weed business makes, above overhead, is paid to the management company, so the business comes out at zero, and the managers come out rich. Many people who operate non-profits get paid extremely well. It's time for Vicente and Tvert to spread out now, the idea is to pretend they help people, while receiving corporate checks, and creating gray areas instead of legalization so they can still cash in. Vicente doesn't want weed legalized, that would put him out of work, he wants weed to seem less scary, so more high-rollers with the cash he demands take the risk, and he can charge for services before and after the bust, instead of just after, like most defense attorneys.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay The old canard is rehashed again. I think I've pointed out at least twice, on the age issue, that I agree with you. As for what we have for now, it is what it is, and my comment was not incorrect.

ASK a PTSD Veteran over 21 if he feels more free now, without the specter of a pot violation going onto his record...and no, I didn't vote for it, but I remember specifically pointing out that I'll maximize every new semblance of freedom that I can, and I will encourage others to do the same.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@tutonehcc @CoreyDonahue I'd consider it "socially tone-deaf" to slap Westword writers and editors in the face, given their ample coverage of cannabis issues, LONG before the Denver Compost dared to do so much as register a politically correct peep. Part of being a reputable news source is also daring to cover non-PC current events instead of insisting the fragile sensitivities of the public cannot handle it.

rosskarr
rosskarr

@Monkey

Well said!! The lawyers did that to me!

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