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Amendment 64: If it's a disaster, other states won't move to legalize pot, says GOP's Ryan Call

Ryan Call, thumbnail image.jpg
Ryan Call
Since Amendment 64 passed in Colorado, Republican officials have been tasked with responding to a policy that the party didn't embrace but a majority of voters supported. With small amounts of recreational marijuana use to be okayed in the state constitution, GOP reps are supporting the state's right to make its own laws while expressing concerns about the policy itself. Take Colorado Republican Party chairman Ryan Call, who sees one potential positive in an A64 disaster: It will encourage other states to keep pot illegal.

At a campaign finance event last week, Call told us that there are a wide array of concerns he still has regarding the consequences of A64 -- but that ultimately, officials have to support the vote of the state.

Ryan Call, Mitt Romney rally.jpeg
Sam Levin
Ryan Call speaking at a GOP Mitt Romney rally earlier this year.
"There is great value in having the states, under our federalist system, be laboratories of experiment," Call said. "And if legalization of marijuana in Colorado or Washington...is shown to be a disaster, then other states hopefully will not follow suit. And that's part of the great American experiment.... In terms of the result of the election, our obligation is to honor the will of that majority, work to enact common-sense regulations that will help mitigate the negative consequences of legalization and empower local communities to decide what kind of an environment they want in terms of raising their kids or negotiating their businesses."

Since election day, some of the most discussed questions about the measure have involved the contradictions between Colorado and federal law. While possession of less than one ounce of marijuana will be legal for adults here, it remains federally illegal in any amount.

A week after A64 passed, Republican Congressman Mike Coffman, re-elected last month, said he would support legislation that would give Colorado an exemption from federal policy. In the announcement of that bill, also backed by Representative Diana DeGette, a Democrat, Coffman said he strongly opposed legalized marijuana but will now work to enact the change, since the state voted it in.

Tom Tancredo, the former congressman and Colorado gubernatorial candidate -- and one of the most prominent local Republicans to back A64 -- thinks conservatives should support the amendment. He said it fits with GOP values of less government and that if Republicans oppose "nanny-state activities," they should support Colorado's right to let adults smoke marijuana if they choose.

Call, however, expressed a lot more concern about the consequences of legalization.

"Our party has taken positions in opposition to the legalization of marijuana in connection with our recent state convention," he said. "And there are significant ramifications to both our business climate, and our kids, quality of schools, and a lot of other things like that.... This has to be resolved at the federal level."

Continue for more of our interview with Colorado GOP Chairman Ryan Call.



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87 comments
amistybleu
amistybleu

He won't be around much longer, there is a huge movement toward people demanding that government step out of the way of our freedoms.................literally a GOP relic and he doesn't even know it.

ldp604
ldp604

A Repubilican representative talking out both sides of his face?! Let me pause to pick my chin up off the floor. "I am for states-rights, but only if I agree with what those rights are", "I am against abortion unless it involves the pregnancy of my mistress", "The only way to preserve the sanctity of marriage is to keep it legally between a man and a woman. At least that is what me and my 4th wife believe.", "I am for fair and equal taxation for all, unless it impacts the loopholes my accountant found". The one positive thing I can say about Mr. Call is at least he is consistent with the rest of his party.

Bobby
Bobby

FACTS vs. "Opinion" (or those who think they magically have the right to tell others what they can or cannot consume.)

FACT: "Judging by every metric, decriminalization in Portugal has been a resounding success," says Glenn Greenwald, an attorney, author and fluent Portuguese speaker, who conducted the research. "It has enabled the Portuguese government to manage and control the drug problem far better than virtually every other Western country does."

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1893946,00.html#ixzz2E7LhfJrz

hockeyfrog27
hockeyfrog27

And if A64 is a success, it will inspire other states to legalize pot.  That would be the best case scenario.

hockeyfrog27
hockeyfrog27

Ryan Call touts the "value in having the states"..."be laboratories of experiment," only to say later any problem with pot legalization "has to be resolved at the federal level."  I never cease to be amazed by Ryan Call's talent to speak on for minutes at a time while still saying nearly nothing.  We need a republican state chairman in Colorado who can articulate his views precisely and who values the Constitution, especially 10th amendment rights.

Bobby
Bobby

This ONCE AGAIN shows how out of touch Establishment "Republicans" are.  Ryan also whole-heartedly supported the CRUSHING of the Grassroots in the latest GOP rules.

Ryan is exactly what is WRONG with the CO GOP, he needs to go, now!

Craig Hammersmith
Craig Hammersmith

no need to give this dolt an iota of attention, there are way more interesting things going on in Denver

Tarik Ocon
Tarik Ocon

Already in effect, already doing what 64 proposed for years, already making society better. The only disaster is bad media.

Daniel Hamilton
Daniel Hamilton

keep the politicians out of it and it will be fine. Politicians screw up everything up they touch! The Greedy Bastards.

Jake Stella
Jake Stella

well hopefully people will have respect for the priviledge

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

"Our party has taken positions in opposition to the legalization of marijuana in connection with our recent state convention," he said. "And there are significant ramifications to both our business climate, and our kids, quality of schools, and a lot of other things like that.... This has to be resolved at the federal level."

Then:

"Call said he wants to see Colorado politicians consider legislation that allows local jurisdictions to regulate legal marijuana as they see fit."

So, in summary, you're for "states' rights," and you're for "handling it at the federal level," and you're for "local jurisdictions regulating it as they see fit." Congratulations on your three-way conflicting idea. I hope you're not writing any laws.

I also see that the "significant ramifications" are so significant that you can only generalize. The reason you generalize is because there aren't any specific PROBLEMS. People DO remember that medical was supposed to cause anarchy. Where are the shootouts in the streets? Why has teen pot use gone DOWN? It's because you're a dinosaur, and you're WRONG.

Monkey
Monkey

Maybe our legislators will just copy and paste our regulations together, like a $200,000 bond to manufacture, like liquor, and a 5 gram limit for sales in retail stores, like in Amsterdam. Plus all the silly surveillance and tracking from our broke MMCED regulations can be applied. And when they finish, many municipalities will have already banned the retail of it, along with property owners who include anti-marijuana clauses in their lease contracts, both commercial and residential. I miss the good old days when no one cared about weed except for the people who smoke it.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

It'll be the same kind of "disaster" medical has been, writ large: nothing but a bunch of whining and baseless griping from people who have a cerebral hemorrhage at the site of a sign with a pot leaf on it.

Bobby
Bobby

Great question: Why would it make other states not follow suit if it went well? They said the same things when slaves were set free and alcohol was relegalized, and prices didn't sky rocket and gang wars and deaths went down instead of up. Prohibition has a history of not working.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

@hockeyfrog27 Very interesting observation, hockeyfrog -- one we're going to make an upcoming Comment of the Day. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Monkey  ... Puerile Pot Punks wanted the Public Spotlight ... and they got it.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident  . Big Government Regulation WORKS !!

Bobby
Bobby

@DonkeyHotay Is that you RYAN??  ROFLMAO

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay Not because of pot. If teen pot use has gone down (at least in Colorado), it sure looks like it's not the "gateway drug" they claim it is. By the way, you're referring to a national trend, not a local trend.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay Not exactly, but the "disaster" they're referring to seems to be the spontaneous enjoyment of a scintilla of returned liberty, rather than the sort of legislative fiasco you and I expect to see. 

ryan.cordova
ryan.cordova topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay @ryan.cordova @Cognitive_Dissident So you hate facts because you think other people lie?

Why do you lie? Why do you hate providing evidence? Why do you hate freedom?

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay You're talking in circles. I already addressed that. Go ahead and be sure to get the last word though. I have a life.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident "If pot use were a "gateway drug" to heroin, they would trend together."

No, they would trend sequentially ... as teens move from lame pot to stronger, more exciting heroin.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay Now you're just being foolish. If pot use were a "gateway drug" to heroin, they would trend together. If you don't understand that, you're mentally challenged. The point I made about correlation and causation was that correlation MAY be coincidental but the LACK of correlation is a fact with COUNTERS causation. I'm sorry if you cannot handle the logic.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident "The two trends would coincide"

Says who?

@Cognitive_Dissident  "Why has teen pot use gone DOWN?"

@Cognitive_Dissident  "While correlation does not prove causality" 

And coincidence does not equate with correlation, much less causation.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay Faulty logic. Teenagers aren't the Borg. They don't act exactly the same way at exactly the same time. The two trends would coincide, and they don't. While correlation does not prove causality, the lack of correlation damages claims of causality.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident "If teen pot use has gone down, it sure looks like it's not the "gateway drug" they claim it is."

... perhaps those teens have passed through the gate of pot to heroin?

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay Or MY favorite part--troll Westword comments. You clearly do mostly that.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident  "Or I could sit around an [sic] doodle ..."

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay Or I could sit around and doodle all day and troll Westword comments.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident ... such heroism ... perhaps you can rent a cabin up on Walden Pond and scribe your manifesto.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay ...and I shall, to the best of my ability, act as a free man, knowing and respecting the consequences of doing so.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Cognitive_Dissident

Little Minds of Little Courage beg for a Scintilla of Liberty.

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