Medical marijuana dispensary review: Fox Street Wellness in Globeville


Fox Street Casey Sour.JPG
Casey Sour from Fox Street Wellness.
I understand wanting to not sell dried-out buds, but proper curing and having display jars so that the stock jars aren't opened and closed all day long can mitigate the need for adding moisture. Strains like the Lamb's Bread and the Casey Sour smelled nearly identical, even though one should have a more acrid, sour stink while the other borders on sweet skunkiness mixed with earthy hash.

It was a shame, too, because the $30/eighth Lamb's Bread buds were all fat, moderately dense pinecones of THC goodness. The small calyxes had thin hairs like threads of red silk. The one stalk I brought home dried out after a few hours without the lid on; broken up, some of the sweet skunkiness came out. It was unexpectedly potent as well, with a nice, energetic pick-me-up that made it a good morning smoke to get the stomach gears rolling.

The $30/eighth Casey Sour didn't fare as well, though. Despite being coated in dark amber trichomes, the leafy buds burned with the same bland, wood-pulp flavor as their smell. Only one of the buds I broke up at home let out any sort of Sour smell, but it was only on first crack of the bud -- and I still didn't notice it in the flavor when it was sparked up in a clean pipe. Nevertheless, it was a mildly stoney sample, one that went well when winding down at the end of the day.

Fox Street Durban Sweet Kush.JPG
Durban Sweet Kush from Fox Street Wellness.
Three or four strains managed to avoid the humidipack curse, including the extremely stinky and sour East Coat Sour Diesel and a Durban Sweet Kush crop that was ripe with the Pine-Sol spiciness of Durban. Of the two, the Durban Sweet Kush was the most appealing, with a light green coloration to the leaves and calyxes and light, rust-colored pistils snaking around. There was good trichome coverage as well, with a sandy dusting around the entire bud. The bud was moist, though, and stems tended to bend and peel rather than snap for the first few days I had it at home. It burned well, however, with surprisingly little popping for the moisture content and a pleasant pine forest undertone to the otherwise spoiled lemon spice Durban flavor.

The $35/eighth East Coast Sour Diesel was impressively tart and rubbery out of the jar in the shop, like pulling a pair of brand-new snowboard boots from their box. Fox Street's cut is a really wild grower, with some major stacking of the calyxes creating what is called fox tails. In a way, it looked like the green tentacles of an upside-down marijuana octopus. The plant was well developed, and left to flower well into its fall stages as the few brown and purple sugar leaves left behind indicated.

Fox Street ECSD.JPG
East Coast Sour Diesel from Fox Street Wellness.
The buds burned down to a snow-white ash and had an enjoyably earthy flavor out of a dry pipe -- and went down especially well through the bubbler. The manager said the ECSD is a favorite among the growers and staff, and I understand why.

He also said that all of their plants are grown in an organic peat moss medium, and are hand-watered and hand-trimmed. And that effort is obvious in the size and overall quality of the buds. If they got rid of the cigar humidifiers, I think they could be putting out a much better product for their patients. Still, the shop is worth checking out -- especially for the reasonable prices on what is otherwise solid-quality herb.

Read more reviews from Westword's medical marijuana dispensary critic, William Breathes, in our Mile Highs and Lows blog, and keep up with all your Colorado marijuana news over at The Latest Word.

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