Arthur Glaz, Air Force lieutenant, killed at Keystone; fourth resort death this season

arthur glaz.jpg
Videos below.
Another tragedy has taken place on the ski slopes of a Colorado resort. Arthur Glaz, a 27-year-old Air Force lieutenant stationed in New Mexico, lost his life at Keystone on Friday.

Glaz is officially the fourth person to die at a ski area in the state this season, although there have been other skiing casualties that aren't included in the count. Details and videos below.

According to a news release, the Summit County Corner was paged about an accident at Keystone shortly after 3 p.m. on Friday, February 8. The victim, identified as Glaz, was wearing a helmet. Nevertheless, he died from injuries resulting from striking a tree on a trail called Porcupine. The coroner says the circumstances and manner of death are consistent with an accident.

keystone porcupine photo.jpg
Porcupine is an intermediate run, and a video of the it uploaded by Keystone a little over two weeks prior to the incident that took Glaz's life (see it below) emphasizes its width and smoothness. Visually, it doesn't appear to be one of Colorado's, or even Keystone's, most challenging -- although, as we know, serious accidents can take place on any slope at any time.

porcupine ski run keystone.jpg
Porcupine, as seen in a Keystone video below.
No information beyond Glaz's name, age and residence in New Mexico was shared by the Summit County coroner. However, we've been able to confirm that he was assigned to Hollomon Air Force base, in the New Mexico community of Alamogordo. In addition, we discovered a holiday video he made for folks back home when he was stationed in Japan. You can also see that clip here.

That Glaz's accident took place in-bounds at Keystone is significant when it comes to calculating the total number of deaths at Colorado ski areas. As we've reported, Colorado Ski Country USA will only include an individual in overall death statistics if he or she perished in public portions of the ski area. That explains why the deaths of ski patrol member Patsy Hileman and outdoor enthusiast James Lindenblatt aren't part of the current roster. Hileman died while skiing out of bounds, while Lindenblatt wasn't at a ski area at all; rather, he was skiing in the backcountry and was swept under by an avalanche.

Continue for more about the tragic passing of Arthur Glaz, including two videos.



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11 comments
Tarik Ocon
Tarik Ocon

Ban it, think about the children.

Don Finley
Don Finley

ban both, just to be safe.... if it saves just one life, isn't it worth it?

Chris Estus
Chris Estus

Ban Skiing. quoting the President of the US, "if one life can be saved."

Ty Link
Ty Link

Looks like we should Ban skiing

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Chris Estus ... too bad they couldn't save your brain.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Chris Estus  ... what "service" ?

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