Cycling: 15th Street Bikeway won't be a trail connecting to nowhere, city says

Thumbnail image for cycling bike lane change.jpg
Big photos below.
A proposed bike lane for 15th Street has been a hot topic in the cycling community, with the advocacy organization BikeDenver making its feelings known at a Valentine's Day love-in at which members presented more than 200 I-love-bike-lanes cards to Mayor Michael Hancock's office; see photos below. Meanwhile, the Public Works department is rallying support for its approach by, among other things, reassuring a critic who shared his thoughts in our comments section.

"Bike lane on 15th Street: Will it enhance safety or continue to leave cyclists vulnerable?," a Charles Trowbridge post published on February 7, inspired plenty of debate among readers, including the following take by dave_in_baker, which we featured as a February 11 Comment of the Day under the headline "Reader: After Larimer, 15th Street bike lane will leave cyclists to fend for themselves."

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Courtesy of BikeDenver
One of the bike-lane-related Valentine's delivered to Mayor Michael Hancock's office yesterday.
Another major concern is that the bike lane only runs from Civic Center to Larimer. 15th street is the only direct route to Lower Highlands, but after Larimer, cyclists will be left to fend for themselves. There is no connection to other bike lanes through Lodo.
Afterward, we received an e-mail response to Dave's concerns from Emily Williams, Public Works' marketing and communications coordinator. She writes:
The 15th Street Bikeway has been designed to connect to several other bike facilities throughout downtown, including the bike lanes on Glenarm, Tremont, Welton, Arapahoe, Lawrence, and with the Cherry Creek Trail at 14th and Larimer. Once the bikeway is installed, cyclists will be able to access Lower Highlands by taking the 15th St. facility to Larimer, heading south on Larimer and to connect with the trail at 14th.
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Courtesy of BikeDenver
At the mayor's office.
And that's not the only option, Williams adds:
Alternatively, they may transition from the left side bikeway to the right side of 15th street at Lawrence Street, where shared use markings will be provided into lower downtown.
Williams encourages cyclists plotting out routes to take advantage of the Denver Bike Map. Physical copies are available for free at Denver recreation centers, the Denver City Council offices and BikeDenver's HQ, at 1536 Wynkoop Street, Suite 801. As for a downloadable online version, you can get one by clicking here. We've also included a copy after the jump, along with more photos from the BikeDenver Valentine's Day love-in.

Continue for the map and more BikeDenver Valentine's Day photos.


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10 comments
Josh Bradley
Josh Bradley

Sounds like a great idea. Get more of them killed and less to contend with on the roads ;)

Jon Parniawski
Jon Parniawski

Anything to get them off the sidewalks, I am in support of.

Craig Hammersmith
Craig Hammersmith

Why are operators of heavy machinery so insistent on being half-wits?

Chad Peterson
Chad Peterson

Why are bicyclists so insistent on riding amongst heavy machinery? Seems kinda counter productive. Let's ride next to all of these motorized vehicles and breathe in that pollution! What a fantastic way to exercise!!

Michael Beckerman
Michael Beckerman

When you take into consideration how poorly people drive today, and then factor in distracted driving from cell phones and texting, putting bikes and cars even closer together is an absolutely recipe for death and destruction on the roadways. The only safe place for bikes today is on the sidewalk. Sorry, but that's just the way it is. I know people want to be able to ride their bikes where ever they want to, but they need to seriously ask themselves this one all important question: Is it worth dying over? Probably not.

Terry Richardson
Terry Richardson

I agree, Michael. Especially when the majority of people on bikes think they own the road.

Michael Beckerman
Michael Beckerman

If there is going to be a bike lane anywhere, it should be on the sidewalk. Putting more bikes out into traffic is nothing more than a good way to get more people killed on bikes. Mixing cars and bikes in the same place is a very bad idea.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Craig Hammersmith  ... what idiots would deliberately ride their bikes among half-wits operating heavy machinery?


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