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Andrew Romanoff talks PAC money, house sale and running against Mike Coffman

Categories: Politics

andrew romanoff 205x205.jpg
Andrew Romanoff.
To some Coloradans, the name Andrew Romanoff is synonymous with disappointment. After losing to incumbent Senator Micheal Bennet in a primary that attracted an almost unheard-of amount of attention, the ex-speaker of the Colorado House took a lower-profile job with the International Development Enterprises, a non-profit that promotes economic development in under-developed countries. The move garnered a Best Of Denver award for "Best Move By A Politician." But as he tells us below, he's got more moves to make -- and a lot of them target Mike Coffman.

Romanoff sat out the 2012 race and watched as Joe Miklosi lost to Coffman, Republican congressman in the 6th Congressional District.

But this past February, Romanoff officially announced his intention to run against Coffman -- a full 21 months before the big show in 2014.

Romanoff recently sat down with Westword to talk up his chances, the lessons he learned from Egyptian activists and, of course, what happened after the house sale heard 'round the world.

Westword: Why did you decide to throw your hat into the ring and run in CD 6 against Mike Coffman?

Andrew Romanoff: I looked at the debate in Congress -- I don't know if you would call it a debate, more of a debacle -- around the fiscal cliff, the sequester, the debt ceiling, the whole parade of incompetence and inability to get anything done. And I thought, 'We can do better.' This is a district that is evenly divided among Democrats and Republicans, and independent voters, so it strikes me as the kind of place where we need the ability to bring people together to solve problems. And that's what I did in the statehouse for eight years. And I think so many of the people I know are losing their jobs, losing their homes, losing their health care. And worse yet, losing their faith in the political process. I see folks in Washington who forgot the people who sent them there, and that's not acceptable to me. Or to my neighbors.

Everyone seems to always be talking about bipartisanship, but this political divide still makes people cynical. Is bipartisanship still part of your strategy?

AR: Well, to me, it's not just a talking point, it's what I've done. Mark Twain used to joke about the weather -- he said, "Everybody complains about it, and nobody does anything about it." (Laughs.) So when I got elected to the statehouse back in 2000, I became part of a minority. I think what Westword used to call "the permanent Democratic minority." And that was a fair knock, because we hadn't had the house since 1976. I spent four years in the minority, worked across the aisle, solved problems, became the minority leader, and changed the tone from one of criticism and complaint to one of solutions. I told our press shop that I don't want to send out another release that said, 'Democrats complain,' 'Democrats attack.' We kind of ran out of synonyms. (Laughs.) I literally crossed out every release, and said, 'Give me a solution.' So we would come up with ideas and give people a sense of what the state would look like if we had the chance to run it. And eventually we got that chance....

I'm really proud of that, and I look at those eight years as a period of progress -- and I look at Washington as a place of paralysis. And I know, this is tough; I'm not naive about this. There are stronger forces and entrenched interests, but I think it can be done.

No Democrat has ever won the CD 6 race.

AR: That's correct, yeah.

Does that intimidate you?

AR: No, I was down in Highlands Ranch for a couple events last week and a number of folks made the same point. But I say, 'Look, I'm not running just to be the first Democrat in CD6, I'm running to be the most effective representative.' The district obviously looks a lot different from when it was first created. Redistricting after the 2010 Census made it the most competitive district in the state, and one of the most competitive districts in the country. I tell folks all the time, if you like the Congress you've got, then you should probably sit this one out. If you think this gridlock is the way to go, I'm not your guy. So I'm excited about the chance to break the logjam and give folks a different kind of representation.

You announced that you're not taking PAC money. Why did you make that decision?

AR: The same reason I did in 2010, and the same reason that President Obama did, because my sense is that -- and I think most Americans sense it -- that special interests have enough politicians on their payroll already. If you look at our inability to make meaningful reforms on a whole set of issues, whether it's energy and the environment or health care. Pick an issue, follow the money, and you pretty quickly reach the conclusion that too many folks in both parties -- and I'm not claiming Democrats are any better -- too many folks in both parties have become too beholden with the interests groups that bought their seats.

I wish I could find a fancier way to say this, but it's a little better than bribery. And I want to be careful. I'm not suggesting that I can tell you how a particular legislator reaches a decision on a particular bill. Only the legislator can answer that question.... But I can tell you that there's no reason that some of the biggest special interest groups in the world lavish millions of dollars on congressional races, in some cases, covering both sides of the race, if they didn't get anything from anyone. They're not doing this out of the goodness of their own hearts. They're doing it because they want to buy access and influence. And there's something very fundamentally disturbing about that system, I think, to ordinary Americans.

You were working with International Development Enterprises before this. How did you get involved with them?

AR: I had an interest in international development, from my own experience -- I used to teach in Central America, I taught English in Nicaragua and Costa Rica before I finished college.... When I was a kid, my grandpa was a doctor who traveled around the world with a group called Project Hope, which brings medical supplies, physicians and nurses to developing countries, and came home with stories about kids he had treated who were growing up in circumstances that didn't look like my own. He taught my sister and me that we had some obligation to make a difference. And then back in 2010, some friends who were involved with IDE recommended the organization to me. I checked it out and liked what they were doing, and I signed on.

How many of those countries that IDE serves have you been to?

AR: With IDE, I've been to Ghana, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Zambia -- also some trips to Nigeria and South Africa and Egypt.

When were you in Egypt?

AR: Interestingly, I was in Egypt in 2009, before the Arab Spring. We met with folks from the Mubarak government, and then we met with democracy activists through a program funded by the Aspen Institute. And the Mubarak folks said, 'We're not perfect, but get rid of of us and you invite the Muslim Brotherhood to take over.' Which is, in fact, what happened. Democracy activists said, 'We'd rather have democracy, no matter the outcome,' and the activists were predicting the downfall of the Mubarak regime.

Continue for more of our Q&A with 6th Congressional District candidate Andrew Romanoff.



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3 comments
geez
geez

Mr. Romanoff's cushy non-profit job at International Development Enterprises is suspicious to say the least...IDE as it is referred to is headquartered in Denver, listed as a non profit in Golden, but is legally registered as a Pensylvania non profit (although the Secretary of State of PA has no records of this organization whatsoever according to a simple database search. 

Hmmm...

According to the Colorado Secretary of State IDE has also been deliquent on taxes and has reformed as a corporation a few times in their decade+ existence...


Hmmm...

geez
geez

Mr. Romanoff's cushy non-profit job at International Development Enterprises is suspicious to say the least...IDE as it is referred to is headquartered in Denver, listed as a non profit in Golden, but is legally registered as a Pensylvania non profit (although the Secretary of State of PA has no records of this organization whatsoever according to a simple database search. 

Hmmm...

According to the Colorado Secretary of State IDE has also been deliquent on taxes and has reformed as a corporation a few times in their decade+ existence...

Hmmm...

DHisLEO
DHisLEO

@geez Since we're smearing employees with their employer"s failings, who do you work for?

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