Operation Cock Block's Bill Sullivan calls for dismissal of Ponzi scheme case against him

bill sullivan mug shot 205x205.jpg
Sullivan's mug shot from 1999.
Bill Sullivan, the subject of our bad-boyfriend story "Operation Cock Block," is now claiming he's innocent of participating in a $15.7 million Ponzi scheme.

"The preponderance of facts support a dismissal of the case against Defendant Sullivan and all monies in his accounts unfrozen and returned to Defendant Sullivan in total," he wrote in a court motion in April.

But the judge did not grant Sullivan's request. Instead, court documents suggest that the civil case against Sullivan is moving toward trial.

Sullivan was accused of fraud last August for allegedly helping to carry out a Ponzi scheme that solicited money from "unaccredited and unsophisticated investors," according to a press release from the federal Securities and Exchange Commission. Sullivan had worked for the company involved, Bridge Premium Finance, since February 2011. Michael Turnock, the owner of the company, was also charged with fraud and has since admitted guilt. The case against him has been settled.

Not so for Sullivan. Earlier this year, U.S. District Court Judge John Kane rejected efforts to settle the cases against Sullivan and Turnock because the so-called final judgments didn't require the men to admit guilt. Though Turnock eventually did so, Sullivan did not. In early April, Kane ordered Sullivan to respond -- and the response he received was essentially a request from Sullivan to drop the case against him altogether.

Sullivan gives several reasons, including that Turnock wrote him a letter "exonerating" him, that his involvement with the company was minimal and that he "did not financially gain from the Ponzi scheme." Sullivan apologizes to the judge for his late response but explains that he didn't know one was required. Because his bank accounts have been frozen, he writes, he can't obtain a lawyer and is therefore representing himself.

A brief order from Judge Kane indicates that a settlement of Sullivan's case is now off the table. Instead, a document in the court file lays out pretrial and trial procedures, suggesting that Sullivan will now have to argue his case in court.

Sullivan has found himself in court before. In 1998, he was charged with theft for stealing close to $1 million from a laserdisc and DVD company where he was bookkeeper. The company failed and Sullivan pleaded guilty to a single count of felony theft. He was sentenced to ten years in prison, but ended up serving two after a courtroom apology.

In a letter to the court, Sullivan explained his actions: "I started taking the money from my company to try to make myself look better, to impress others, to gain admiration from friends, family and most importantly, my father." However, when Westword asked him about the case in 2010, he said the letter was part of his legal strategy.

Our 2010 story recounted several ex-girlfriends' experiences with Sullivan -- including a pattern of him borrowing money and using their good credit to live the high life. A group of them banded together in an attempt to stop him dubbed "Operation Cock Block."

Read the judge's order for Sullivan to respond and Sullivan's response below.

Order to Show Cause for Defendant Sullivan

Sullivan's Response to Order to Show Cause

More from our Follow That Story archive: "Operation Cock Block target Bill Sullivan gets conned in the dating section of Craigslist."


Follow me on Twitter @MelanieAsmar or e-mail me at melanie.asmar@westword.com



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3 comments
Sarah Osborn
Sarah Osborn

Wow. I hope they throw the book at this cad.

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