Marijuana edibles THC limit could put me out of business, says Cheesecake Lady

raspberry.cheesecake.edible.205x205.jpg
More photos below.
Yesterday, in a post about some of the weirder aspects of the House-approved marijuana bill, attorney Warren Edson made note of a cap on the THC levels allowable in pot-infused edibles -- limits that he described as "pretty low."

Jessica LeRoux, aka the Cheesecake Lady, who owns and operates Twirling Hippy Confections, one of the longest-running edibles companies in the state, couldn't agree more. If the limits become law, she says, "I can't see any way that my business could survive."

House Bill 13-1317, whose latest version is on view below in its entirety, calls for "a serving size for edible retail marijuana products that does not contain more than ten milligrams of active THC, label requirements regarding servings for edible retail marijuana products, and limitations on the total amount of active THC in a package that is no more than one-hundred milligrams of active THC."

jessica.leroux.cheesecake.lady.jpg
Jessica LeRoux shows off some of her edibles.
The Twirling Hippy website lists plenty of products under one-hundred milligrams. They're grouped in three tiers, with the first falling in the 50-60 milligram range, the second between 70 and 85 milligrams, and the third set at 100-125 milligrams. However, LeRoux tells us this roster is out of date. "Now, tier three is 125 milligrams across the board, the next tier above that is up to 240 milligrams, and post-Amendment 64," which allows people to share marijuana, "we've been making customized cakes that can go anywhere from 500 to 1,500 milligrams."

The escalating THC amounts is not only being driven by competition from other manufacturers, LeRoux says. Rather, they are largely a result of medical marijuana patients who use edibles to counteract pain building up a tolerance to THC -- meaning they require higher amounts in order to feel the same level of relief they'd previously experienced with fewer milligrams.

"They're not eating these for the euphoric effect," she stresses. "They're intended to get you through the day when you're dealing with pain."

At this point, it's unclear if the proposed limit would be put in place for recreational and medical consumers alike, since the establishment of new medical standards has been put on hold until after the legislature acts -- something that frustrates LeRoux. But if the standard is applied across the board, and that's entirely possible, medical patients would have to eat many more edibles in order to get the same level of pain mitigation. LeRoux believes doing so would be beyond the financial means of many patients, and ingesting so many more sweets would raise other dietary and health concerns.

What effect would the limits have on purely recreational users? LeRoux thinks that "a first-time user may have a pleasant and euphoric experience on 25 milligrams," but the ten milligram limit "creates a false bottom. Let's say you eat ten milligrams and nothing happens. You're going to keep eating, and then it's going to catch up with you."

Continue for more of our interview with Jessica LeRoux about proposed marijuana edibles THC limits.



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72 comments
therealtrickjames
therealtrickjames

Does anyone really think any of this will be law forever? When alcohol prohibition was lifted it didn't end overnight across the board and what was written into the books as law got tweaked repeatedly over the years. All of this panic about what is going to happen to individual businesses and the economics of the industry in the short term pales in comparison to the long term effect the passage of A64 and I502 are going to have on a national level going forward. Yes the situation here kinda sucks and yes we didn't get everything we wanted but I for one am not panicking or throwing in the towel. All new industries are volatile. If you can't deal with that in your business plan then I am sorry but you probably shouldn't be in the business in the first place. If you don't like the laws then don't stop fighting to change them. I don't shop at dispensaries so I don't really care what happens to that side of Cannabis legislation. Most of the weed grown is adulterated with pesticides and fungicides to the point where it is unconsumable. Both A64 and A20 provide enough legalization for the average consumer to produce or acquire cannabis without risk of legal repercussions and truthfully I think this is all average folks who use it really care about.

BuddJones
BuddJones

Out in the Boondocks by Valmont and Boulder Reservoir are some mighty fine Boulder Dispensaries that are home to wonderful Medical Marijuana and Hash that is as wholesome as the yogurt that this city is famous for. Or is that the Pot this city is famous for? Yah Mon, its the Pot, the Chicks like the yogurt.

Mile_Hi_Dave
Mile_Hi_Dave

We in the industry think a 12% combined tax is about right... 5% sales tax, and 7% excise tax which should generate between 3.5 and 20 million dollars based on the two extremes of potential sales I've seen bandied about. If the MMED cant make that kind of money work for actual enforcement"

Funny how she claims to be speaking "for the industry" and she shows her lack of knowledge on what the taxes are for.  The taxes, of which the first $40M is to be set aside for school construction, will be added to the general fund.  FEES from licensing of stores and grows are what is supposed to be paying for enforcement.  The MMED squandered the money from last year on  expensive rent (to a lawyer for the city, which is a total conflict of interest) to the Denali's and expensive furniture.  Seems those furnishing the new courthouse are using the same retailers for their $5000 desks!!  

Now Nederland, they understood what the voters meant when they said "regulate like alcohol".  

"According to the draft language, the ordinance would allow the town of Nederland to license marijuana retail stores. But unlike the measures currently proposed on the state level, this local ordinance would allow on-site consumption at cannabis clubs that could be open from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. daily. And in Nederland, marijuana could be sold in two ways: one for off-site consumption in sealed containers, and the other for on-site consumption. Out-of-state tourists would only be allowed to purchase up to five grams in a day, and only for on-site consumption. "By allowing only on-premise sales in a bar-like atmosphere, tourists can enjoy Colorado's marijuana industry but are consuming the marijuana onsite and have little to nothing to leave with," the proposed ordinance reads."

From another article here in Westword: http://www.westword.com/promotions/viewEmailByDistLstDelivId/vmg-7095/1/

muzzylu
muzzylu

Edible medical marijuana works the best for pain and you can't overdose on it. I found a great medical marijuana book that has great recipes, uses less valuable marijuana, and has smaller candies to use for pain on a daily basis: MARIJUANA - Guide to Buying, Growing, Harvesting, and Making Medical Marijuana Oil and Delicious Candies to Treat Pain and Ailments by Mary Bendis, Second Edition. How about just $2.99 for great e-book on medical marijuana? This book has great recipes for easy marijuana oil, delicious Cannabis Chocolates, and tasty Dragon Teeth Mints.  

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 ** Convicted Criminal Sex Offender Rob Corry again baiting Clients into Harm's Way! **

http://www.denverpost.com/news/marijuana/ci_23174466/colorado-pot-collectives-test-limits-amendment-64

The bus with tinted windows sits idling in a parking lot on Colfax Avenue, right across from the Denver Justice Center, of all places.

Chris Jetter stands at the vehicle's door in a "Yes We Cannabis" T-shirt, carding people.

He's put out word on Facebook that anyone 21 or over is welcome to come down for a free "dab" — a concentrated form of marijuana heated and smoked with a bong-like contraption called an oil rig.

This is a promotion for Blue Mountains, a nonprofit "recreational cannabis community"that Jetter and his partners believe provides them the legal cover to grow and stockpile marijuana, and to provide it to like-minded members at or below cost and tax-free.

An untold number of similar collectives have formed in Colorado since Amendment 64's passage in November, hoping to meet consumer demand before retail pot stores' anticipated opening in 2014.

It's unclear, however, whether recreational pot collectives will withstand legal scrutiny. Some officials warn that the arrangements not only put participants at risk — they also threaten Colorado's careful attempts to craft regulations meant to generate tax revenue and to ward off a federal crackdown on the state's new pot frontier.

...

Other collectives are not as transparent. Some are run by convicted felons barred from the medical-marijuana industry because of their records, said Robert Corry, a Denver lawyer whose firm has helped establish more than a dozen collectives since Amendment 64 passed.

Some are limited-liability companies, some are partnerships and others have no formal structure, Corry said.

The nonprofit collective MJ Proper Inc.— which claims to operate exclusively for "charitable, scientific, and educational purposes" — offers on its website to deliver six packs of cannabis-infused beer, cookies and bud bags to adults 21 and over who "display personal responsibility with the highest moral standards."

Qualified adults become members by placing an order, it says.

...

MJ Proper's principal office address, listed in its articles of incorporation, matches that of a south suburban Denver suites hotel.

Collectives also thrive among medical-marijuana patients and caregivers, though restrictions on caregivers banding together exist.

Corry takes an expansive [unethical and dangerous] view of Amendment 64, which allows adults 21 and over to possess an ounce or less of marijuana and grow up to six plants for personal use. The law also allows for the transfer of an ounce or less "without remuneration," or payment.

The argument for collectives rests on language in the amendment that permits "assisting" in that personal use. Corry contends the wording allows an unlimited number of adults to join in and designate their six plants to a collective for "assistance."

Collectives, the thinking [aka. legal delusion] goes, can stockpile pot and offer it to members for reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses — but not for profit. [ EPIC LEGAL FAIL! ]

Corry said he urges collective operators to keep copious records of their rent, power, fertilizer, chemicals and other expenses. He said he believes collectives also can include their labor costs, but he advises against it because documentation is more difficult.

"Words are important," [illiterate incompetent authors of A64 take note] Corry said."You can't say, 'I'm selling marijuana' or 'This costs $200.'I tell people, 'Mind your words and assume everyone is a cop.' " [see Epic Legal Fail below]

...

Law enforcement officials predicted collectives would take advantage of a loophole in Amendment 64 to assemble large pot grows, said Tom Gorman, director of the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, a federal program that works with law-enforcement agencies to reduce drug trafficking and production.

Gorman questions how collectives accurately determine reimbursement costs and wonders about the underlying motivation.

"Why would you do that if it's not for money?" Gorman asked. "Are they so thrilled with marijuana and think it's such a great thing that it's their responsibility to offer it as cheap as possible? Why would you go through all the trouble for no profit at all?"

Corry said some collective operators just enjoy growing and using with others. Some — like Jetter's Blue Mountains — are building a following with an eye toward possible licensing as a recreational pot business.

Jetter said the collective has more than 100 members and maintains a modest grow of 34 plants on 2½ acres zoned for agricultural use.

The collective's five-member board meets weekly and reviews costs every 90 days, Jetter said. To get established, he said Blue Mountains is charging $300 an ounce, well below the $500 it could charge.


...


audreyhatfield
audreyhatfield

They better not limit the patients on the amount of THC. That's bullshit! Don't fuck with our Meds!

audreyhatfield
audreyhatfield

Part of the reason the "State Government can't keep up with all theses changes in the medical marijuana regulatory system" is because they blew the money on things they didn't need to. Google it...As far as, "all the safety issues that are in jeopardy" google, "state of Colorado" and see what you can find on "marijuana only" offenses. Doesn't appear to be much of a danger considering the lack of information on it. I'm amazed with each session how Waller, King and Levy waltz in and make claims without ANY evidence to back it up "all the danger" "the urgency" public safety. They won't spend any money on studies but they sure have waste enough if it. Reason? They already know they will be proved wrong. Colorado is corrupt.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 *** Arizona's Zero-Tolerance Stance on Pot and Driving ***

Officer Eric Riley, traveling east on his motorcycle, stopped Zaccard for making a slow lane change. Zaccard disputes details of Riley's police report. He insists that he wasn't "straddling" the line between Main Street's eastbound lanes for 500 feet as he moved from the right to the left lane.

After making the stop, the cop thought the driver's speech and body movements seemed slow, his report shows. Zaccard had "extremely dilated pupils and red and watery eyes," plus a "white/green coating on his tongue," leading Riley to believe Zaccard was stoned, the report states.

A breath test showed a blood-alcohol content of zero.

Riley asked him when he'd last smoked marijuana. Zaccard told him he'd smoked one joint the day before.

Admissions like that are golden to certified drug-recognition experts, like Riley, who know that traces of marijuana can stay in the bloodstream for days or weeks.

Zaccard made a few key errors on a field-sobriety test. He couldn't walk heel-to-toe in a straight line and had trouble following instructions, Riley's report states. On the "one-leg stand" test, Zaccard "hopped" and seemed to have balance problems.

Soon enough, the Sunfire was towed, Zaccard's blood was drawn, and he was sent home with a citation.

Zaccard hadn't received a court summons, meaning the Gilbert prosecutor's office hadn't yet decided to move forward with a DUI case. His blood-test results weren't available as of press time.

Yet the prosecution, in theory, probably has an airtight case. Zaccard is a regular user of marijuana. So it's all but certain he'll fail the blood test. His medical-marijuana card won't help him if Gilbert presses the case, because of the technicality that doctors recommend, but not prescribe, marijuana.

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/2013-05-02/news/riding-high-arizona-s-zero-tolerance-stance-on-pot-and-driving/


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 *** Aurora to consider running the show for marijuana ***

The city of Aurora could be getting into the pot business — and make itself the exclusive grower and seller of the drug without the worry of private competition.

The City Council is set to consider Monday several ways of dealing with Amendment 64, which legalizes recreational marijuana in Colorado. The choices are broad, ranging from banning certain establishments to allowing them.

Another is for Aurora to run the show — from seed to sale.

No other city in the state is known to be considering the latter enterprise, which would give Aurora virtually total control over how pot is grown and sold, similar to state-run liquor stores outside Colorado.

http://www.dailycamera.com/news/ci_23169494/aurora-consider-running-show-recreational-marijuana

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

It's HILARIOUS how The Twirling Hippie was all for REGULATION ... as long as those regulations included her and her business while excluding other people, thereby limiting her competition and increasing her profits.

Now that the Government REGULATION she begged for and supported has excluded and limited her ability to function, she now whines that it's a bad thing.

Boooo hoooo hooooo <== [crocodile tears] 


Remember Stoners -- Regulation WORKS! -- Now Bend Over and Receive the REGULATION you begged for! 

Mish Desmarais
Mish Desmarais

This sucks for recreational but it absolutely will not work for medical. You cannot impose a limit like that on the edibles market for medical patients; they need it for specific purposes. It is not fair to punish them because of fear mongering. Besides, I thought it was written into A64 that medical would not be affected.

Testecleese
Testecleese

Those cheesecake items look delicious! I'd hate to be left alone in a room with a dozen of those and a big glass of milk...probably have a hard time remembering it though.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

             *** REGULATION WORKS!! -- Bück Dich and get REGULATED, suckers! ***

Monkey
Monkey

"they have a minimum 20 percent swing in either direction when they're testing something. That's a 40 percent window, a huge disparity. And ten milligrams is too small a number for the labs to prove it accurately.""and what happens if something comes out at eleven milligrams? The state has zero plans for that."

If that's true, what's the point? I would love a business that the government forces people to use, especially if accuracy is unnecessary. Sounds like a testing lab will be the cash cow next year, not manufacturing or selling weed.

stuka1
stuka1

@Mile_Hi_Dave 

 

Now Nederland, they understood what the voters meant when they said "regulate like alcohol".  

"Out-of-state tourists would only be allowed to purchase up to five grams in a day, and ONLY FOR ON-SITE CONSUMPTION

 Do you have any idea what this means?  Why don't you smoke 5 grams of pot -- an eighth and a half -- and then try to drive from Nederland to Denver and see how far you get.

BuddJones
BuddJones

@Mile_Hi_DaveFor the discerning Medical Marijuana patient who seeks discreet shopping in an secure community this is about as good as it will get other than driving to Cherry Creek. Bordering Washington Park is perfect for jogging Moms or retired Cougars with cash to burn and energy to match. RRrrrrrrrr!

COlady
COlady

@Mile_Hi_Dave

Oh the irony... Im on the town panel for Nederland about A-64 Dave, and the writing you cite is a proposal we are discussing along with others, our next meeting is tonight! Also the while the excise portion of the tax covers the schools as you rightly say, the new 10% sales tax is to pay the MMED, do YOUR homework before your hurl rocks at my house! Im speculating those MMED funding numbers are based on my projected 5% sales tax combined with the state's 2.9 sales tax. 

I appreciate your speculation on my behalf about what i've "missed" dave, but I think you've missed quite a bit about what it means to own a MIPs... If even a small portion of my clients make the switch to retail or dual use I will HAVE to be both things to both industries to survive. MIPs are in no position to kiss anybody goodbye. The projected costs of the build out required for dual licensing will likely outstrip the meager profit margins i could enjoy on either or both product lines... Not to mention the unlikelihood that any retail users will want to buy weak overpriced and over taxed edibles when they can get stronger things right off facebook and craigslist today...

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

[continued] 

Jetter said he and his partners may keep the collective running — and shun the for-profit system — if the state adopts regulations that are too restrictive. He opposes as anti-free market pending legislation that would require growers and sellers to initially be part of the same company and for stores to grow most of what they sell.

That model, known as vertical integration, governs the medical marijuana industry and is supported by law enforcement, medical marijuana trade groups and others.

Sitting on the bus, Jetter voiced concerns about "draconian, archaic requirements" and exorbitant taxes and fees.

Then his lawyer — dressed in a suit, seated up front — chimed in.

"It would be tragic if the government overregulated the retail industry and everyone would have to come to you," Corry said with a smirk.

That kind of talk worries those who have spent months crafting the state's proposed recreational marijuana regulations.

"This loose association, not subject to regulatory oversight, is exactly what we were trying to avoid," said Sam Kamin, a University of Denver law professor who sat on an Amendment 64 task force that crafted recommendations to legislators. "The concern is if regulated marijuana is heavily taxed and these sort of cooperatives open up, not subject to tax, it will undercut the model the state is trying to put in place and raises the specter of federal enforcement."

In California, federal authorities have routinely targeted nonprofit collectives that operate medical-marijuana centers, Kamin said. Colorado officials crafting recreational-marijuana rules often mention trying to avoid federal intervention, although how to do that is unclear.

"There are a lot of areas of Amendment 64 where you might say there are gray areas open to interpretation," said Larry Abrahamson, retired district attorney for Larimer and Jackson counties, who also served on the state task force. "I think to get too liberal in the interpretation at this stage, before regulations are put in place, can be risky."

Boulder attorney Jeff Gard said the collective model appears to blur the lines between commercial centers and personal use and cultivation spelled out in Amendment 64. Nothing in the amendment mentions assigning one's cultivation rights to someone else, he said.

"It seems to me it's one step ahead of where the law is right now," Gard said.

Some collectives would seem fine, he said — for example, people who don't want to grow their respective six plants at home bonding together to jointly lease and tend a warehouse. But hundreds of people assigning their growing rights to a collective carries the risk of felony prosecution, Gard said. 

[ Translation: Rob Corry is an UNETHICAL INCOMPETENT Shyster who should be disbarred for his gross violations of the Rules of Professional Conduct ]


The state Court of Appeals is unlikely to look kindly on liberal interpretations of pot laws, either, he said. He cited the court's decision last month to uphold the firing of a quadriplegic man for off-the-job medical-marijuana use. The court found employees have no protection to use it anytime because marijuana is illegal under federal law.

Gard said seeking legislation defining what "assisting" means in the context of collectives is a better course than testing the law with felony cases.

Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey declined to discuss the legality of collectives but said their existence demonstrates why such laws should not be created through constitutional amendments written by authors who "often leave a lot of loopholes in them."

Jetter said he is aware of the risks of the path he has chosen.

He has faced pot-related charges before, most recently in 2010 in Adams County after an alarm went off at his dispensary grow site, he said. Felony charges were dismissed, court records show.

In 2000, Jetter received a deferred sentence after pleading guilty to possession of 8 ounces or more of marijuana, a Class 5 felony, records show. Such cases are dismissed once a sentence is completed, so Jetter was not blocked from receiving dispensary licensing.

Jetter said he's confident the collective rests on strong legal ground. [from the Stoner Dictionary: "strong legal gound" = completely illegal, based upon delusion, greed and zero comprehension of law ]

HipTip: if you knock upon the Devil's door often enough, he will eventually answer.



DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Jetter said he and his partners may keep the collective running — and shun the for-profit system — if the state adopts regulations that are too restrictive. He opposes as anti-free market pending legislation that would require growers and sellers to initially be part of the same company and for stores to grow most of what they sell.

That model, known as vertical integration, governs the medical marijuana industry and is supported by law enforcement, medical marijuana trade groups and others.

Sitting on the bus, Jetter voiced concerns about "draconian, archaic requirements" and exorbitant taxes and fees.

Then his lawyer — dressed in a suit, seated up front — chimed in.

"It would be tragic if the government overregulated the retail industry and everyone would have to come to you," Corry said with a smirk.

That kind of talk worries those who have spent months crafting the state's proposed recreational marijuana regulations.

"This loose association, not subject to regulatory oversight, is exactly what we were trying to avoid," said Sam Kamin, a University of Denver law professor who sat on an Amendment 64 task force that crafted recommendations to legislators. "The concern is if regulated marijuana is heavily taxed and these sort of cooperatives open up, not subject to tax, it will undercut the model the state is trying to put in place and raises the specter of federal enforcement."

In California, federal authorities have routinely targeted nonprofit collectives that operate medical-marijuana centers, Kamin said. Colorado officials crafting recreational-marijuana rules often mention trying to avoid federal intervention, although how to do that is unclear.

"There are a lot of areas of Amendment 64 where you might say there are gray areas open to interpretation," said Larry Abrahamson, retired district attorney for Larimer and Jackson counties, who also served on the state task force. "I think to get too liberal in the interpretation at this stage, before regulations are put in place, can be risky."

Boulder attorney Jeff Gard said the collective model appears to blur the lines between commercial centers and personal use and cultivation spelled out in Amendment 64. Nothing in the amendment mentions assigning one's cultivation rights to someone else, he said.

"It seems to me it's one step ahead of where the law is right now," Gard said.

Some collectives would seem fine, he said — for example, people who don't want to grow their respective six plants at home bonding together to jointly lease and tend a warehouse. But hundreds of people assigning their growing rights to a collective carries the risk of felony prosecution, Gard said. 

[ Translation: Rob Corry is an UNETHICAL INCOMPETENT Shyster who should be disbarred for his gross violations of the Rules of Professional Conduct ]

The state Court of Appeals is unlikely to look kindly on liberal interpretations of pot laws, either, he said. He cited the court's decision last month to uphold the firing of a quadriplegic man for off-the-job medical-marijuana use. The court found employees have no protection to use it anytime because marijuana is illegal under federal law.

Gard said seeking legislation defining what "assisting" means in the context of collectives is a better course than testing the law with felony cases.

So far, it appears law enforcement and prosecutors are taking a wait-and-see approach.

Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey declined to discuss the legality of collectives but said their existence demonstrates why such laws should not be created through constitutional amendments written by authors who "often leave a lot of loopholes in them." He also warned that collectives that deliver run the risk of being robbed.

Jetter said he is aware of the risks of the path he has chosen.

He has faced pot-related charges before, most recently in 2010 in Adams County after an alarm went off at his dispensary grow site, he said. Felony charges were dismissed, court records show.

In 2000, Jetter received a deferred sentence after pleading guilty to possession of 8 ounces or more of marijuana, a Class 5 felony, records show. Such cases are dismissed once a sentence is completed, so Jetter was not blocked from receiving dispensary licensing.

Jetter said he's confident the collective rests on strong legal ground. [ LOL! -- SSAASSD!]

stuka1
stuka1

@DonkeyHotay= EPIC pathetic prohibitionist troll FAIL!

"It's HILARIOUS how The Twirling Hippie was all for REGULATION ... as long as those regulations included her and her business while excluding other people, thereby limiting her competition and increasing her profits."

It's HILARIOUS how the Jackass makes shit up and thinks it's reality. 

COlady
COlady

@DonkeyHotay  Do your homework ass, I campaigned against 64 because I knew that there were fatal flaws which would strip us of our rights... Do you just make stuff up to fit your agenda? It is well known that I participated in the original rule making for Medical, and I tried like hell to make the rules fair to all businesses who were willing and able to comply no matter where they were located in the state or how well capitalized they were at day one. 

Jessica

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Mish Desmarais "I thought it was written into A64 that medical would not be affected."

LOL! ... A64 decimates the "medical" marijuana charade.

The only people who will be left on the "medical" marijuana registry will be those under 21 years old who were excluded completely by A64 ... and Growers/Caregivers who are exploiting the increased plant count limits allowed by A20 but not allowed by A64.


Mile_Hi_Dave
Mile_Hi_Dave

@stuka1 @Mile_Hi_Dave Considering I consume close to a quarter a day...your hypothetical situation would not prove to be any problem whatsoever.  However, I do not drive when I am medicated, on the opiates given to me by my doctor, or cannabis.  

Nederland has it mostly right...the 5 gram thing is silly, I agree.  But, with the new regs sent to our Gov, out of staters will be limited to purchasing 7 grams at a time.

BuddJones
BuddJones

@COlady@Mile_Hi_DaveThe days when pounds of Marijuana were about $135 come to mind whenever cruising down The Denver Boulder Turnpike. Anyway, easy access off the highway should be a plus for these dispensaries that are seeking to attract Denver's most demanding MMJ patients who will drive a few miles for variety and potency beyond compare

stuka1
stuka1

@COlady @DonkeyHotay 

"Do you just make stuff up to fit your agenda" 

He just makes shit up, period. It's what pathological liars DO.

greggoldstonowner
greggoldstonowner

You said it bro, the a64 was supported by the dispensarys because they thought they would be the ones making all the money. My boss who owns a disp., was all for it even posting ads on his ads saying vote for it colorado. When i told him watch out you will be sorry if this passes, what does he do, he begged all of us employees the day before the election to not vote for it. He realizes now he wont be making the millions he thought.

stuka1
stuka1

@DonkeyHotay  <=== has NOTHING better to do than spam blogs from its mother's basement

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

stuka1  "I have better things to do than respond to your inane babblings [sic]."

Fail!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

stuka1 "A64 has huge problems."
stuka1 "ANYTHING is illegal under 21 with A64 for rec purposes"
stuka1 "DISPLAYING AND POSSESSING over an oz is illegal."


stuka1
stuka1

@DonkeyHotay

@DonkeyHotayLoser

@DonkeyHotay And yet here you are, sexless, unemployed, pathetic, trolling the site every day on every article with your worthless vitriol and ignorance. Its no wonder why you dont have a partner- youre obviously obsessive, obtuse, and have a lack of intelligence surpassed by few. Why are you complaining about the site when you practically live on here, day after day after day? Dont shit where you eat, little troll. Maybe go outside once in awhile, get a hobby, maybe try growing a brain. Try finding something that you can actually offer, because you clearly have nothing to offer here- or in any other capacity in life. In short- get a life, you pathetic, cowardly, moronic loser.

QFTMFT.


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@greggoldstonowner ... you must work for that retard who owns Terrapin Station in Boulder.

Dumber than a box of rocks, he is.




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