Top

blog

Stories

 

Video: Jared Polis's hemp amendment passes after nods to George Washington, Betsy Ross

jared.polis.hemp.amendment.205x205.jpg
Video and more below.
Last month, Colorado's legislature passed a hemp-farming registry bill that Governor John Hickenlooper signed into law. But can hemp escape the role of marijuana's sober sister on a national scale? A new development gives it the best chance of doing so in ages. Colorado Representative Jared Polis was among legislators pushing a hemp amendment to the giant farm bill -- and after he took to the House floor citing George Washington's advocacy and the possibility that Betsy Ross's original flag was made of the fiber, the item passed. The video and details below.

Here's the video of Polis and colleagues speaking on behalf of the hemp amendment to the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, better known as the FARRM Bill. The legislation would prevent the federal government from interfering with colleges and universities that choose to research industrial hemp in states, like Colorado, where doing so is legal.

This kind of measure might have gotten nowhere just a few short years ago. But earlier today, it passed the House by a 225-200 vote, raising hopes that lawmakers might opt to let states make their own decisions when it comes to marijuana, too.

Look below to see a release about the amendment from Polis's office, followed by a reaction from Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, a national organization that advocates for marijuana legalization.

Jared Polis office release:

Polis, Massie, Blumenauer Pass Amendment to Protect State Rights to Grow Hemp for Research

Bipartisan Coalition Works to Give Colleges and Universities Ability to Conduct Critical Research

WASHINGTON, DC -- Representatives Jared Polis (D-CO), Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) introduced an amendment to H.R. 1947, the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, the FARRM Bill, that would allow colleges and universities to grow and cultivate industrial hemp in states where it is already legal without fear of federal interference. The amendment passed today by a vote of 225 to 200.

"Industrial hemp is an important agricultural commodity, not a drug," said Rep. Polis. "My bipartisan, common-sense amendment, which I've introduced with Representatives Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), would allow colleges and universities to grow and cultivate industrial hemp for academic and agricultural research purposes in states where industrial hemp growth and cultivation is already legal. Many states, including Colorado, have demonstrated that they are fully capable of regulating industrial hemp. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp. The first American flag was made of hemp. And today, U.S. retailers sell over $300 million worth of goods containing hemp -- but all of that hemp is imported, since farmers can't grow it here. The federal government should clarify that states should have the ability to regulate academic and agriculture research of industrial hemp without fear of federal interference. Hemp is not marijuana, and at the very least, we should allow our universities -- the greatest in the world -- to research the potential benefits and downsides of this important agricultural commodity."

"Industrial hemp is used for hundreds of products including paper, clothing, rope, and can be converted into renewable bio-fuels more efficiently than corn or switch grass," said Rep. Massie. "It's our goal that the research this amendment enables would further broadcast the economic benefits of the sustainable and job-creating crop. I look forward to working with Rep. Polis and Rep. Blumenauer on this issue."

"Because of outdated federal drug laws, our farmers can't grow industrial hemp and take advantage of a more than $300 million dollar market. We rely solely on imports to sustain consumer demand. It makes no sense," said Blumenauer. "Our fear of industrial hemp is misplaced -- it is not a drug. By allowing colleges and universities to cultivate hemp for research, Congress sends a signal that we are ready to examine hemp in a different and more appropriate context."

Nineteen states have passed pro-industrial hemp legislation. The following nine states have removed barriers to its production: Colorado, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia.

"Vote Hemp applauds this new bi-partisan amendment and we are mobilizing all the support we can. This brilliant initiative would allow colleges and universities the opportunity to grow and cultivate hemp for academic and agricultural research purposes," said Eric Steenstra, President of Vote Hemp. "It would only apply to states where industrial hemp growth and cultivation is already legal in order for those states to showcase just how much industrial hemp could benefit the environment and economy in those regions," continues Steenstra.

"Federal law has denied American farmers the opportunity to cultivate industrial hemp and reap the economic rewards from this versatile crop for far too long," said Grant Smith, policy manager with the Drug Policy Alliance. "Congress should lift the prohibition on the domestic cultivation of industrial hemp as soon as possible. Allowing academic research is an important first step towards returning industrial hemp cultivation to American farms."

Law Enforcement Against Prohibition release:
HOUSE ALLOWS STATES TO DETERMINE OWN HEMP POLICY; IS MARIJUANA NEXT?

States' Rights Win May be Harbinger of Future for States Legalizing Marijuana

WASHINGTON, DC -- Drug policy reform activists are hopeful the passage of an amendment of the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013 (FARRM Bill) allowing educational institutions to grow hemp in states that have voted to allow research on the product will be a harbinger of things to come for states that have legalized marijuana. Despite repeated statements from the Obama administration that a clarification on federal policy toward Colorado and Washington, where voters approved initiatives to legalize and regulate marijuana last year, would be coming "soon," both states have thus far been left in the dark as to whether voters' will is to be respected on the federal level.

"In passing this amendment, Congress has taken a major step toward respecting states' rights and the fundamental right of voters to overturn wrongheaded policies out of step with the local populace," said retired Seattle police chief Norm Stamper, a member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, a group of cops, judges and other law enforcement officials opposed to the war on drugs. "It was action at the state level that ended the prohibition of alcohol in the 1920s and if this vote is indicative of how the federal government will react to voter-approved initiatives in Colorado and Washington legalizing and regulating marijuana, it will be states that end the destructive, senseless, wasteful prohibition of marijuana."

Law Enforcement Against Prohibition represents more than 5,000 police, prosecutors, judges, corrections officials and other law enforcement officials and 80,000 other supporters who believe that the war on drugs has increased violence and decreased quality of life in communities across America.

More from our News archive: "Top ten hemp legends: Which myths are true -- and which went up in smoke?"


Sponsor Content

My Voice Nation Help
36 comments
rsteeb
rsteeb

George Washington instructed his gardener to sow INDIAN hemp seed everywhere.  IOW ganja.  Look up "W. B. O'Shaughnessy" for the details.

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

Check out what corporate dupe and ostensible hemp supporter Rep. Colin Peterson (D) said during debate (from http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/house/306785-house-approves-hemp-cultivation-in-colleges-universities#ixzz2WpcMwDGj ):


"Late Wednesday, House Agriculture Committee ranking member Collin Peterson (D-Minn.) said there has been some success splicing a gene into hemp plants that allow them to emit a fluorescent glow, making it easier to differentiate between it and marijuana.

"So now the hemp that grows is fluorescent, and so you can clearly tell the difference between the hemp and the marijuana," Peterson said. "So we have solved that problem through research.""

My response:

"Peterson is an unspeakable moron!  Fire all of the swine parasitizing our society on the pretext of making us safe from what is demonstrably one of the safest drugs known to mankind and then we won't be wasting money obsessively inspecting fields of hemp for any that contain enough THC to get high.  There is absolutely no need to engage in genetic manipulation of hemp to make it glow, or even to limit the amount of THC in hemp -- just legally define it to be cannabis grown for seed or fiber.  Any number of corporations are maneuvering to force the arbitrary adoption of standards for hemp that will exclude all but their own proprietary strains from use, not out of any concern for public safety or health, but to line their own pockets at the expense of everyone else who wants to produce hemp.  Peterson needs to go research how he became such a dupe and a shill for these bad actors."

cdndenver
cdndenver

That is all good and dandy but the FARRM bill was defeated in the house today. So passing an amendment to a bill that then went down to bipartisen defeat is not going to help anyone. 

Juan_Leg
Juan_Leg

Why don't we just rename ALL forms of marijuana, 'Hemp' & move on ?........

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

MythBuster: The First American Flag was made of Hemp <= pathetic LIE!

The real answer: wool bunting

Since there is no record of who really made the first USA flag of 13 stars and 13 stripes, or when or even where it was made, the claim that it was made of Hemp is laughable. 

Nearly all flags of that era were made of one of two materials: flags for use on ships were made of WOOL BUNTING -- and until the 1860's, all wool bunting was imported from England. Flags used by land forces were generally made of SILK, and most often had hand-painted symbols on them. 

Since the 1777 resolution by Congress that established the Flag of the United States on 14 June was passed while they were considering Naval matters, it is very likely that the flag of 13 stars and 13 stripes was conceived as the national Ensign for use at sea. Therefore the first USA flags of 13 stars and 13 stripes were actually made of English wool bunting. 

Furthermore, the US Army was not authorized to carry the stars and stripes into battle until the 1840's. Land forces used different flags, generally blue SILK with the US Eagle and shield painted on them.


Hey Jared Polis -- why do you spew MYTHS and LIES on the Congressional Record ??

Have you NO SHAME?


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

MythBuster: The Constitution was written on hemp paper <= FALSE !!

The lie that the Constitution, Declaration of Independence, and Bill of Rights were all written on hemp paper. This claim is often made by lying stoners in favor of legalizing marijuana, as hemp is fiber made from the marijuana plant.

However, all three documents are written on parchment, which is treated animal skin <= not vegan friendly!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

MythBuster: Betsy Ross made the first American flag <= FALSE !!

The Betsy Ross story is the most tenacious piece of fiction involving the flag. There simply is no credible historical evidence — letters, diaries, newspaper accounts, bills of sale — that Ross (then known as Elizabeth Claypoole) either made or had a hand in designing the American flag before it made its debut in 1777.

The story cropped up in 1870, almost 100 years after the first flag was supposedly sewn, when William Canby, Ross’s grandson, told the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia that his grandmother made the flag at George Washington’s behest. Canby’s sole evidence: affidavits from family members. The iconic 1893 painting of Ross sitting in her Philadelphia parlor with the sun beaming down on the flag in her lap is a scene invented by Charles H. Weisgerber, the artist and entrepreneur who profited from the Betsy Ross legend.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Hey Jared, it's time to--  Regulate Homosexuality Like Alcohol!

... REGULATION WORKS!


DonkeyTroll
DonkeyTroll

Waiting for DonkeyHotay to come around and bitch about something

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@rsteeb I don't have the link to hand, but one can find a photographic record online of the very page in Washington's diary on which he wrote: "Began to separate the Male from the Female hemp … rather too late", perhaps the most suggestive evidence that the Founding Fathers may have used cannabis for its psychedelic effect as well as for fiber.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@RobertChase = dilettante poseur

"I am not even a registered patient" -- Robert Chase


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Juan_Leg ... why don't brain-dead bong-sucking stoners just STOP LYING?


GuestWho
GuestWho topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay 

"Furthermore, the US Army was not authorized to carry the stars and stripes into battle until the 1840's. Land forces used different flags, generally blue SILK with the US Eagle and shield painted on them."


Why do you spew MYTHS and LIES?


http://www.americanflags.org/docs/about.jsp?pageId=0690200091781119362395740

http://www.loeser.us/flags/revolution.html

In 1834 the stars and stripes flag was officially adopted for use in battle by the United States Army.  Variations of the Stars and Stripes were hoisted during land battles of the War for Independence. 

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay   Rough drafts of the Declaration of Independence survive which were almost certainly written on hemp paper, not that that excuses Polis' failure to check his facts.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@GuestWho <== BULLSHIT!

The U$ Army Infantry did not receive authorization to carry the "Stars and Stripes" flag until 1841

The U$ Calvary did not receive authorization to carry it until 1887, but did not actually carry it into battle until 1895 !!

You = Epic FAIL ... as usual.


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@RobertChase = another lying stoner who just makes shit up to fit his preconceived delusions.

 Of course, two days later Washington says he put the hemp in the river to soak and separate out the fibers, and later in September that he started to harvest the seed..

What "sinsemilla" you lying ignorant asswipe?

His diary -- including the parts you lying asswipe stoners deliberately ignore -- clearly indicate he divided the plants because the males made stronger fiber while the female plants produced the seed needed for the next year's crop.

How many stoners soak their pot IN THE RIVER?

What idiot grower of marijuana FROM SEED waits until August to try in vain to sex their crop and eliminate the males that have already been spewing pollen for over a month?

One again you prove yourself to be a LYING KNOW-NOTHING DILETTANTE!

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay It is uncanny how, faced with a telling piece of evidence, you ignore it completely.  Propose some alternative reason why Washington wanted to separate male plants from female ones other than to produce sinsemilla.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@rsteeb ... it was just another LIE like the LIES about The Flag, Betsy Ross and The Constitution which were also FALSELY mentioned and repeated by LYING LIARS ... like you.


rsteeb
rsteeb

@DonkeyHotay Right, that's why it was mentioned in support of the hemp amendment.  Obviously.

Was Sir William Brooke O'Shaughnessy also interested in dogbane?

rsteeb
rsteeb

@DonkeyHotay 

So tell us, mister Historian, which is the lie-- that "Indian hemp" is actually "ganja", or that Washington told his gardener to sow it "everywhere"?

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@rsteeb ... that's just it, it's all in your IMAGINATION.

There is NOT a SINGLE NOTE or diary entry -- out of THOUSANDS by Washington himself and those who knew him -- of any CONSUMPTION of "indian hemp", not for "medicine", not for recreation.

Just another pathetic Stoner Lie, like the LIES that Jared Polis spewed in Congress about the first American flag being made of hemp, or that the Constitution is written on hemp paper, etc, etc.

One of the reasons why the majority of society doesn't take stoners seriously is because you fucktards LIE so much -- your credibility = ZERO!

rsteeb
rsteeb

@DonkeyHotay Who said he smoked it? ...and why do YOU imagine he would specify Indian hemp with such enthusiasm?  For its softer textiles?

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@rsteeb .. and Washington kept all these 1000s of diary notes about every nuance of his personal, public and business life ... yet completely failed to note or mention -- even once -- that he ever used or smoked "indian hemp"

Imagine that.


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@RobertChase

"Granting the DOR regulatory authority over retail sales of cannabis is not bad at all" -- Robert Chase 

.

GuestWho
GuestWho topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay  <<< Too stupid to read or comprehend the facts spoon fed to him...proven liar and moron.  Many history books back up my statement about the STARS AND STRIPES FLAG officially being used by th U.S. Army in the 1830s.  LOL.  What a pathetic loser you are.

GuestWho
GuestWho topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay You said the u.s. army in your original post and the army ARTILLERY units began using a variation of the stars and stripes flag in 1834 contrary to your original post.  It was only in your latter post that you added army "infantry" to try to cover for your incompetence. 

http://www.poetpatriot.com/timeline/tmlnflagus.htm

GuestWho
GuestWho topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay  <<<<< --------- Too stupid to realize when he's been whipped. Vexillology fail.  Google it.

http://www.9thcavalry.com/history/flags.htm

Here's the chronology.

a.. 1834 - General Regulations for the Army authorize a red-over-white guidon for companies of dragoons, of which there was a single regiment at the time. It was silk, 27 x 41 inches, with a 15 inch swallowtail, with the letters "U.S." in white on the upper half and the company letter in red on the lower.

b.. 1836 - Second Regiment of Dragoons is raised, leading to the issuance of guidons with regimental designations in various formats. Nevertheless, in . . .

c.. 1841 - the new General Regulations for the Army reaffirmed the 1834 design.

Now Trending

Denver Concert Tickets

Around The Web

From the Vault

 

Loading...