Marijuana: NFL-pot-policy-change billboard up near Mile High in time for season opener

Categories: Marijuana, News

marijuana.nfl.billboard.205x205.jpg
Big photos below.
At 10 a.m. today, hours before the NFL season kickoff game between your Denver Broncos and the Baltimore Ravens, Marijuana Policy Project spokesman Mason Tvert will hold a news conference at 1700 North Federal, in Mile High Stadium's shadow. The occasion? The intro of a new billboard calling for the league to amend its policy banning players from smoking pot -- a substance made legal in small amounts by Colorado's Amendment 64, a measure Tvert helped propel. Continue to see this billboard and others that illustrate Tvert's long-term commitment to the issue.

As we reported in July, Tvert first tackled the topic in 2007, when he was best known as founder of SAFER (Safer Alternative For Enjoyable Recreation). At the time, the Miami Dolphins' Ricky Williams had applied for reinstatement to the NFL after a marijuana-related suspension, and Tvert helped coordinate the placement of a billboard in the same location near Mile High Stadium encouraging the running back to sign with Denver.

Here's a look at that billboard....

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Courtesy SAFER
...and here's a photo of Tvert at a press event timed to the placard's unveiling:

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Courtesy SAFER
Then, this summer, Tvert, under the aegis of the Marijuana Policy Project, coordinated the placement of a billboard in Las Vegas. This time, the focus was on boxer Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr., who in March was suspended from competition for nine months and fined $900,000 after a positive marijuana test. The placard decried the punishment and argued that such policies encouraged alcohol abuse.

Here's a photo of the Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. billboard:

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Courtesy Marijuana Policy Project
As the situation with Chavez demonstrates, policies punishing athletes for marijuana use are common in many sports organizations. But a MPP blog post on the subject stresses that some organizations have started rethinking such edicts. In May, for instance, the World Anti-Doping Agency, which monitors Olympic competitions, boosted the threshold of permitted THC (the active ingredient in marijuana) from fifteen nanograms per milliliter of blood to 150 -- and Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) has followed suit.

Not the NFL, however -- which is why Tvert is sending a billboard-sized message. Does he think the subject will come up during tonight's national broadcast of the Broncos-Ravens game?

Continue to see photos of the new billboard and hear from Mason Tvert.


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7 comments
Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

I'm betting it'll come up during the game, if only because of the DEA policy letter.

whocares
whocares

Anyone else with a real job has to take drug tests and still can get fired for MJ, even here in CO, so why should atheles be any further above the law than they already are?  I find this to be pretty misguided.

derp
derp

@whocares There's no "law" that he's trying to argue Athletes should be above, drug testing is a per company and organization decision and rule.  He's arguing that it doesn't make sense to levy such gigantic fines against Athletes for using cannabis when they can freely abuse alcohol which destroys brain cells all while the league settled a concussion law suit about brain damage incurred over the years.  So if the damage is already bad enough from the physical hits, and they don't mind if a player drinks themselves stupid then why suspend them for a half a season for a few tokes after a game.


Also along the line of or your argument about why argue for Athletes when the common man has to take a drug test I would venture a safe guess that Tvert would argue just as strongly about excluding employee's from jobs who enjoy cannabis as well.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

@derp @whocares As much as I want to agree on this "it's on your company" thing, a lot of it can be blamed on the Drug Free Workforce Act. If corporations hope to sell to government (and what corporations don't?) they have to invade their employees privacy.

ILikesToVomitOnMysel
ILikesToVomitOnMysel

@derp @whocaresWaaaaaaaa. Someone is mad because folks have a safer choice now......The voter's have spoken and don't want it treated as an 'illegal' drug anymore....We voted to regulate LIKE alcohol....In the English language this means that we don't drug test for the more dangerous drug, alcohol, so it sure as hell doesn't make sense to test for the SAFER substance.....Unless of course you are a sore loser who loves to suck down PBR's and pass out in a pool of your own vomit...

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