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Marijuana sales banned in far more places than they're allowed

Categories: Marijuana

denverskyline-MattWright-Creativecommons.jpg
Creative commons/Matt Wright.
Yesterday marked the deadline for Colorado's 271 cities and towns and 64 counties to decide whether they want to ban recreational cannabis businesses and sales -- and it is starting to look like Denver will be ganja ground zero.

Already, four of the ten largest cities in Colorado (Colorado Springs, Thornton, Westminster and Centennial) have banned recreational cannabis sales outright, and five others have placed moratoriums on shops until next year.

Lakewood has a moratorium in place until January 2014; Fort Collins, Pueblo and Arvada have put pot on hold until March 2014; and Aurora is waiting to make a decision until May 2014. Of these locations, Aurora seems to have the most interest in actually revisiting the issue, with its council hearing proposals on regulatory systems as recently as two weeks ago.

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But unless and until Aurora gives the okay, Denver will be the lone big city in Colorado that is allowing recreational cannabis sales made legal by the passage of Amendment 64. Denver City Council has already approved recreational cannabis rules and in November will ask voters to approve a 3.5 percent special tax (which can be increased to as much as 15 percent) on recreational cannabis sales. That's in addition to proposed state taxes up for a vote next month, too.

The City of Boulder will also allow recreational sales and is expected to approve licensing rules this month. On November 5, Boulder voters will be asked to approve a 5 percent special tax on cannabis sales.

But Boulder County has implemented its own 22-day moratorium starting today. Boulder County Commissioners will decide on October 22 whether or not to allow retail cannabis shops in unincorporated parts of the county.

Several other counties have already decided to allow recreational businesses. They include Summit, Huerfano, Saguache, Costilla and Pueblo counties.

Towns that will allow recreational cannabis sales include Aspen, Basalt, Black Hawk, Breckenridge, Carbondale, Durango, Eagle, Frisco, Glendale, Glenwood Springs, Leadville, Manitou Springs, Telluride, Silverthorne, Steamboat Springs, Crested Butte, Silverton, Red Cliff, Leadville, Salida, Georgetown, Northglenn, Nederland, Silverton, Idaho Springs and Pueblo.

Other municipalities with moratoriums include Avon (September 2014), Palisade (January 2014), Lafayette (March 2014) and Erie (December 2014). Additional towns that plan to revisit the matter in 2014: Cañon City, Commerce City, Manitou Springs, Durango, La Junta and Vail.

More from our Marijuana archive: ""Hemp: First harvest in more than fifty years begins in southeastern Colorado" and ""Jenny Kush, pot activist, remembered at moving (and loud) candlelight vigil."


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39 comments
azimmiza
azimmiza

Seen this before, been there before. Just like Dry Areas with alcohol.

jamesmcvaney
jamesmcvaney

I don't care for the headline of this story. The reality is more like, places that were expected to ban retail cannabis have taken steps to ban it. Other places have moratoriums in place to see how things play out. Some have votes on the matter coming up. Others have created and accepted business regulations and started accepting applications. And some odd places like Longmont have banned it against the will of a good majority of voters.

However, many places in Colorado where cannabis was not available before will have access to it through the new retail stores. And when it gets down to it, it is because there are many small towns in Colorado where it only takes like 10, or up to 200+/- people to sign a petition to get anything on the ballot. The smart folks will put their stores in these small border towns and be able to make bank while, importantly, greatly improving the quality of life in the small town through the huge increase in revenues a town can see from appropriately taxing cannabis.  For instance, if we use our oppositions numbers for trips per day to the dispensary in one town my team and I am working on, we could increase the town's budget by an order of magnitude and then some through a tax. Doing so would obviously have immediate and tremendous effects on the quality of life in that town.

FYI: Fruita, CO is voting on allowing recreational dispensaries. It would be a great town to set up a new retail dispensary come July 1st, 2014 as it borders a major metropolitan area of Colorado where retail and medical marijuana are banned <snicker>, Gran Junction.  Though I don't think anyone is managing a campaign to help it win. 

rosiorick
rosiorick

How sad...once again old fights are being waged by the prohibitionists.. who insist there is no reason for medical access and structure within the law.

Let us present the Medical Academics who would come forward from across the nation to provide sworn testimony and free educational seminars for all of our legislators and community leaders...

If our elected officials.. care about the sick and dying..the aged..the Veterans...the Baby Boomer’s..the Educated and Informed...the compassionate People of Faith..the 18-40 Voting Citizens...., then they will allow the MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC EXPERTS to come forward and allow science and common sense to rule...not back-door politics within the "good ole boy network".

KathleenChippi
KathleenChippi topcommenter

And they need $60-$80 million to regulate less than 300 businesses? 

14,000 plus liquor licenses, 12 employee's and 1.6 million yearly budget.   

"LIKE ALCOHOL"--like the voters were promised.

Brandon Adian
Brandon Adian

Mitch Siff manitou is listed as allowing sales

James McVaney
James McVaney

All of this banning has the unintended consequence of creating locations on the borders of the places with bans where any recreational cannabis shop is going to do brisk business. I lobby and manage elections regarding municipalities trying to ban cannabis businesses. From this work, I know there are a lot of places are holding off on regulations. And lot of the places where it is banned - save the Eastern plains counties, will eventually allow recreational cannabis stores. My team and I have already changed multiple municipalities decisions on bans and moratoriums, and are always working on changing more. If you live in a place with a ban and are interested in starting a cannabis related business there, by all means, get in touch with me.

Ashley Jackson
Ashley Jackson

Hey and don't try mailing it... Most people have a sense of smell.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

As for not allowing legal sale in so many places, I'm go glad they're embracing the black market, which is un-taxed and free from local regulations! Here in Jefferson County, we should have a robust black market at least until 2015.

Cognitive_Dissident
Cognitive_Dissident topcommenter

Gee. Who'd have guessed when they invited municipalities to ban sales that they actually would? This is one major reason I did not vote for A64.

Shari Walsh
Shari Walsh

It looks like the mountain towns (also Denver and Pueblo) will be the only one with a Rocky Mountain High.

Weltonwalker
Weltonwalker

Recall all of the politicians responsible!


James Tallo
James Tallo

just don't take any advice from rob corry on the matter....that dummy thinks it's legal to smoke up on the runway at a Rockies game... o_O

claygooding
claygooding

Municipalities can ban recreational sales and growing facilities but they can't ban personal grows or possession of one ounce in public.

Since black market marijuana is already banned there shouldn't be any there now anyway.

jamesmcvaney
jamesmcvaney

I am Colorado's most successful campaign manager in defeating municipalities when they try to ban cannabis related businesses.

Places that have already banned, generally, had voters vote against A64. 

However, a good amount of municipalities are placing moratoriums and bans in place even when the majority of voters in favor of A64.

That being said, my team and I are fighting municipalities in many parts of the State and reversing bans and moratoriums. Some of these places include  Palmer Lake, Idaho Springs,  Chaffee County, and Larkspur. Most of the places we are agitating to move forward with retail cannabis are being forced to put the issue to votes. A lot of places will be voting on allowing retail cannabis businesses in April. 

If you live in a area that has a ban in place, and want that changed, please contact me through my website mcvaneyltd.com .

Clayton Capra
Clayton Capra

Yes, let's ban the pot shops and open up more brew pubs.

Michael Sabin
Michael Sabin

Fortunately, each municipality can create thier own rules...

Tracey Nichols
Tracey Nichols

unfortunately each municipality can hold prvt elections regarding sales, distribution etc

Tony Tafoya
Tony Tafoya

im pretty sure they have secret ban meetings becuse nobody i knew heard they were banning weed we heard that colorado people vted hands down legal .

Mitch Siff
Mitch Siff

Denver Westword: I thought Manitou Springs decided to pass for now??

che1030
che1030

and all of the restrictions, bans and moratoriums were passed by legislatures, not the will of the people.  Boo.  But it's fine as long as those cities don't get to benefit from the tax income.

McShyster
McShyster

Democracy in action. Thank lyin' Brian Vicente for allowing localities to ban marijuana sales.

Monkey
Monkey

Sounds like the Marijuana Enforcement Division will have very little regulating to do. But for some reason, they want more money from customers on top of the outrageous license and application fees to perform their exhausting enforcement duties.

davebarnes
davebarnes topcommenter

"moratoriums"

WTF?!

moratoria

Did you flunk your high school Latin class?

 

stuka1
stuka1

@James McVaney  Um are you going to be spearheading the effort to remove all of the politicians who have shit on the Will of the People from office as well? 

stuka1
stuka1

Oh, look, a jackass sock.  How pathetic.

Matt_in_Boulder
Matt_in_Boulder

@claygooding

"Since black market marijuana is already banned there shouldn't be any there now anyway."

 That's the funniest thing I've read all week!

Monkey
Monkey

@jamesmcvaney Good luck with Longmont. A large majority voted for A64, yet city council banned all marijuana establishments.

stuka1
stuka1

@Clayton Capra Naw, let's NOT ban the pot shops and STILL open up more brewpubs. ;-)

neightten
neightten

@Tony Tafoya not banning weed. banning selling weed.

jamesmcvaney
jamesmcvaney

@stuka1 ^^^No. My friends are working that. My skills are in communication and agitation. That being said, a lot of politicians are coming around. Now-a-days a good amount of politicians truly want to do the right thing and move issues forward, whereas before only very liberal politicians were willing dealing with cannabis. A large part of this is because of MMj and the regulations that the State has created for the recreational model. 

However, as always, some conservative folks who simply have not witnessed the true medicinal and harm reducing benefits of cannabis will continue to defecate on the will of the 55% of the voters in Colorado.

If you want to make sure your local politicians are doing the right thing, simply reach out to them. Good politicians are generally  easy to reach.


jamesmcvaney
jamesmcvaney

@Monkey @jamesmcvaney  Longmont did indeed vote in favor or A64, however, the City is too large (100,000 people) for me to do anything with unless people with resources step-up. And that is not likely as there is a MMC on the border of Longmont. 

jamesmcvaney
jamesmcvaney

@stuka1- In defeating municipalities, contractually I can not fully answer that question. However a few recent (last year) places I can mention are Eagle, CO, Palmer Lake, and Idaho Springs. Currently I have 3 elections lined-up for April - with Palmer Lake being one of those.

Idaho Springs was an interesting one... they had an open-ended moratorium in place, so a local on my team initiated petitions to put regulations in place and to alter the moratorium. Just the act of doing this heated up the water on the Town council so much that they choose to draft their own regulations and remove the moratorium w/o having to take the issue to the people.

In helping A64 pass, I had great success in rural Colorado with my "Vote Hemp Yes on 64" issue committee. I targeted and engaged rural Coloradans regarding industrial hemp so much so that I clearly helped swing multiple rural counties to vote in favor of A64.

Furthermore, I was also Fmr Denver City Council member Doug Linkhart's MMj liaison to all the Denver dispensaries during his mayoral bid in 2011.

Hope that helps. You can also look at my website for more info on me. mcvaneyltd.com

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