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Sean Teater among three ski season fatalities so far, death of Vail icon's grandson isn't included

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More pics of Sean Teater below.
In January of last year, we reported that there'd been three official ski area fatalities at that point of the season -- but the most high-profile skiing death, of longtime ski patrol vet Patsy Hileman, wasn't included.

The situation is almost identical this season. Three fatalities, including that of Sean Teater, seen here, are official, but the total doesn't include Tony Seibert, grandson of Vail Mountain's founder.

Why not?

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Patsy Hileman.
As we've reported, the resorts themselves have established the rules about whether skiing deaths are counted toward the official total -- and this standard excludes those that are outside boundaries where the public is allowed to ski, even if they're otherwise on the ski area's property.

That was the case with Hileman. She was swept under by an avalanche at Snowmass on December 30, 2012 -- and while one report said she'd been skiing "inbounds," another stressed that the area in question was "not explicitly open to the skiing public due to its inherent dangers."

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A photo from Tony Seibert's Facebook page.
That's similar to what happened in Seibert's case. Earlier this month, he and friends were in East Vail Chutes, outside the boundaries of the ski area; a Vail Resort plan describes it as "an extremely steep, avalanche prone bowl that drains down to Interstate 70 or to East Vail." And indeed, an avalanche was triggered, taking Seibert's life.

As such, according to Colorado Ski Country USA spokeswoman Jennifer Rudolph, there have been three official skiing casualties so far this season.

The first, on December 11, took the life of Norwood resident Scott Harlow; he reportedly died on the intermediate Pick 'N Gad run at Telluride. And more recently, on January 11, Aspen's Jonathan Stuart was found unconscious after getting caught in trees on Aspen Mountain's Bellissimo run and didn't survive.

Between these two dates, on December 21, Sean Teater, a nineteen year old from Fort Collins, died from injuries sustained two days earlier at the Winter Park run dubbed Butch's Breezeway.

Continue for more about ski fatalities in the 2013-2014 season, including additional photos.



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12 comments
Carter Beck
Carter Beck

From living with a people who work at Breck the work their asses off to make sure your safe everyday so yes they do all they can and all these deaths have happened in areas skiers are told is dangerous

Patrick Shehan
Patrick Shehan

Resorts are doing too much to try to keep people safe and it is leading a public false sense of security in the mountains. It's simple learn about the snowpack before you ski the backcountry, ski in control and know that the mountain is king. If you don't respect the mountain and nature you will be owned quick.... Besides I think more people die on I-70 trying to get to the hill than actually die while skiing. No one forces anyone to ski, respect the risks and if you can't handle the heat, stay out of the kitchen. Bottom line, get out there, have fun and be free because that's what skiing is all about!

Pete Copeland
Pete Copeland

Lets get the police to set up speed restrictions and give out tickets for people who ski too fast. The money from the fines may help offset the profit loss from all the people who stop coming out to ski.

John McLaughlin
John McLaughlin

Skiing is not supposed to be safe! Quit trying to make everything safe, it is ruining everything!!!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Mikey, you can always get a job as Paid Liar for the Ski Industry, where they too just MAKE SHIT UP to fit their preconceived propaganda plans.


What LIES do you have for us today about the Marijuana Industry ?


Why not misinform your readers that the Colorado "Make My Day" law also applies to Ski Gondolas ?



Steve Holmberg
Steve Holmberg

The amount of snow has nothing to do with it. It is the makeup of the snowpack that its creating dangerous conditions out of bounds. In bounds it is business as usual, and people die in this business.

Cheryl Marian Baldwin
Cheryl Marian Baldwin

The amount of snow this year has something to do with it. Skiing has risks, and you need to make yourself aware of them.

Jordan Snyder
Jordan Snyder

Yes and no. Honestly most of the time I'm thinking "if someone needs this many warning signs to tell them to be careful, maybe we should let nature take its course." But then again, who hasn't ducked a rope or two in their day? The last few years' accidents have made me stop ducking ropes and I now wear my beacon on powder days or when I know I'll be in the sketchier terrain. My point is mostly that we all develop a trust and comfort in inbounds skiing/riding (especially if you spend time in the bc, the resort feels as safe as kindergarten) but I have had to reconsider that comfort.

John Davis
John Davis

No, you purchase a waiver (ticket) that makes them not responsible for your health.

Steve Burrell
Steve Burrell

Even if it's in bounds it's always user assumption of risk. You're a human being, sliding down an mountain at the top of the continental divide in the middle of winter surrounded by other human beings doing the same thing.

Don Herman
Don Herman

So often it's due to skiing out of bounds. "Bounds" exist for a reason.

Sasha Twopointoh
Sasha Twopointoh

yes.you assume a risk when you are skiing.From what i know and hear we are the only ones who 'baby' these types of things.Ive lived in Dillon almost my entire life and i see people skiing out of their leauge all the time.Conditons can change at any mintue leaving you in a sketchy situation.Im very experianced snowboarder and i would never want anyone to feel sorry if i died on the hill.shit happens

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