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Marijuana tourism is getting mainstream hype whether state officials like it or not

marijuana.tourism.cbs.205x205.jpg
Photos, video and more below.
As we've noted, official tourism agencies in Colorado continue to keep marijuana at arm's length, as it were. For instance, a VISIT DENVER list of things the city has in common with Seattle, released prior to the Super Bowl, somehow managed to skip legal pot entirely.

Not that the media has needed much prodding to promote such trips. A recent CBS feature on the subject (see the video below) has now been supplemented by a hefty Washington Post spread that even includes a "vocabulary lesson for pot tourists."

marijuana.tourism.cbs.2.jpg
A shot from the CBS report.
The CBS report juxtaposes footage of correspondent Barry Petersen hanging in a limo as visitors blaze up -- imagery that's rapidly becoming a cliche -- with visits to a grow, a shop and the workshop of a glassware artisan.

To put it mildly, no new ground is broken by the clip. But the Washington Post offering is considerably more ambitious.

Here's a screen capture from the package:

marijuana.tourism.washington.post.screen.capture.jpg
Sporting photos aplenty, reporter Andrea Sachs's account goes into the sort of detail that's commonplace in traditional travel writing but has been all but nonexistent in marijuana-tourism stories to date.

Yes, Sachs documents her Denver-area ride in a "long black van with no telling markings" organized by Colorado Highlife Tours. But she also experiences the scene in Pueblo, which one commentator hopes to help transform into "the Little Amsterdam of Colorado," delves into the world of edibles and gets into the question of where people who visit the state can actually consume cannabis without running afoul of public-smoking prohibitions.

In a sidebar, Sachs helpfully points out-of-towners to hotels, such as Morrison's Cliffhouse Lodge, said to be marijuana-friendly, plus eateries capable of satisfying the anticipated case of the munchies at a tour's conclusion; she mentions Milberger Farms in Pueblo and Udi's Bread Cafe in Denver.

Also included is the aforementioned roster of vocab terms, which range from relatively straight-forward definitions for "strains" and "sativa" to "couch lock" -- "When you take one puff too many and melt into your furniture." And if some of the entries in her "common slang for cannabis" roster seem a little antique, at least she didn't include "tea" along with "grass" and "reefer."

True, Sachs isn't above having a little fun at ganjapreneurs' expense: She follows a statement by one shop owner ("Colorado will be a tourist stop for everyone in the United States until it comes to their state") with the dismissive line, "Dream that little creampuff dream, pot patriots." But overall, the package demonstrates that marijuana can be covered in much the same way other types of tourism are -- as a completely normal, commonplace attraction.

At present, state agencies aren't contributing to this transition: A statement provided to the Post notes that "the Colorado Tourism Office has positioned Colorado as a premier four-season destination, and the organization has no plans to use the legalization of the drug to promote the state." But it seems to be happening whether officials take part or not.

Here's the CBS roundup.

Send your story tips to the author, Michael Roberts.

More from our Lists & Weirdness archive circa January 24: "Photos: Twelve things Denver and Seattle have in common other than legal pot."


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30 comments
DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Looks like Wasteweed will have to prove that the vast majority of its readers aren't Puerile Pot Punks ...


LOL! ... Epic Fail!


     *** High Times, Westword sue Colorado over marijuana ad restrictions ***


The publisher of marijuana magazine High Times has sued the state of Colorado in federal court over the state’s rules preventing recreational cannabis businesses from advertising in most publications.


High Times, along with local weekly magazine Westword, filed the lawsuit on Monday. It marks the first time anyone has challenged the restrictions in court.


The rules allow recreational marijuana businesses to advertise only in publications that are adult-oriented. According to the state’s rules, recreational marijuana stores can advertise only in a publication that “has reliable evidence that no more than 30 percent of the publication’s readership is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21.” 


The lawsuit argues the rules, which also restrict television, radio and outdoor advertising, are an unconstitutional restriction of free speech.


The magazines are “chilled from soliciting advertisements from prospective clients and prevented from making revenue from clients who wish to engage in advertising concerning marijuana-related products and services,” the lawsuit’s complaint states.


The lawsuit doesn’t state specific instances in which High Times or Westword were harmed by the rules. In Westword’s latest issue, there are at least nine ads by marijuana businesses advertising that they are open for recreational sales or soon will be.


It is also unclear how the suit’s filing in federal court will impact the judge’s assessment of its claim that the ads concern “lawful activity,” since marijuana is illegal federally.

Kyle Williams
Kyle Williams

That red meat you love so much is worse for you than Pot is.

Ed Haas
Ed Haas

Money for the state is good for all of us.

Clayton Capra
Clayton Capra

^^He says as he slams down his empty can of Red, White and Blue.

Scott McMahon
Scott McMahon

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ these weed articles make me sleepy. When will it go away?

Clayton Capra
Clayton Capra

There's not much to promote yet. Even Amsterdam's official tourism site does little more than list a dossier on coffeeshops. People will come despite what the resident troll says.

Ray Lakers
Ray Lakers

if you can legally grow it, sell it they will come...

Mallory French
Mallory French

@Dan Rote: you sir are in for some sad times in the future. Bless your heart.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

*** Puerile Pot Punks reap what they have sown !! ***


More than half of Coloradans say marijuana legalization has been bad for the state's image, even though a majority also continue to support the new laws, according to a poll released Monday.


Fifty-one percent of Coloradans surveyed for a Quinnipiac University poll said they thought legalization has been bad for Colorado's image. 

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Only a total idiot stoner would travel hundreds or thousands of miles to Colorado just to purchase a pathetic ounce of overpriced, overtaxed, over-regulated government controlled warehouse schwag from some Greedy Big $$ Dispensary Cartel.



DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

... Regulate Red Meat Like Alcohol !!


                  *** Regulation Works! ***

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

Succinctly put, Ed. Thanks for posting.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

Interesting perspective, Clayton. Thanks.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

That definitely seems to be the case, Ray. Thanks for weighing in.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

They do indeed. Thanks for posting, L Vincent.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay

@DonkeyHotay So what?  59% said they'd continue to support the law, that's all that matters asshole.

LibTardLover
LibTardLover

@DonkeyHotay  all i know is that a MAJORITY of voters said YES to A64. The language 'to regulate marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol' was read by everyone who voted for A64. Even a child can understand the laws purpose. Case closed.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay

@DonkeyHotay except they are and will continue to.  You've obviously never lived in an area where getting Pot is a huge hassle.  And your depictions are hilariously incorrect.  It's amazing you're still as butt-hurt over this whole thing.  It's not going away.  So suck it loser.

cardboardcowboy
cardboardcowboy

@DonkeyHotay Donkey's psychology has been studied thoroughly in Canada. Check it out: 


"(CNN) -- If you've ever complained that the trolls junking up online comment sections are a bunch of sadistic psychopaths, you might be onto something.

An online survey by a group of Canadian researchers suggests that Internet trolls are more likely than others to show signs of sadism, psychopathy and "Machiavellianism": a disregard for morality and tendency to manipulate or exploit others.

"It was sadism, however, that had the most robust associations with trolling of any of the personality measures," says an article by psychologists from the University of Manitoba, University of Winnipeg and University of British Columbia. "In fact, the associations between sadism and ... scores were so strong that it might be said that online trolls are prototypical everyday sadists."

Sadism is a tendency to take pleasure in other people's pain or discomfort. "

http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/11/tech/web/online-trolls-sadists/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

That's our Donkey: a real asshole!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@LibTardLover <== fucking retarded child who didn't read much less comprehend what A64 actually proposed.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@DonkeyHotayFAKE "You've obviously never lived in an area where getting Pot is a huge hassle"


It's available in EVERY City and Town in the U$A, every High School, and even in Prisons.


Only a lowlife ostracized loser like you would have suffered a "huge hassle" obtaining weed in the U$A, you stump-stupid stammering imbecile.





DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@cardboardcowboy


Troll = someone whom you disagree with and who posts uncomfortable facts and realities that you can't refute.


hth.


Step right up and get some more Donkey Therapy ... no charge.




cardboardcowboy
cardboardcowboy

@DonkeyHotay

"(CNN) -- If you've ever complained that the trolls junking up online comment sections are a bunch of sadistic psychopaths, you might be onto something.

An online survey by a group of Canadian researchers suggests that Internet trolls are more likely than others to show signs of sadism, psychopathy and "Machiavellianism": a disregard for morality and tendency to manipulate or exploit others.

"It was sadism, however, that had the most robust associations with trolling of any of the personality measures," says an article by psychologists from the University of Manitoba, University of Winnipeg and University of British Columbia. "In fact, the associations between sadism and ... scores were so strong that it might be said that online trolls are prototypical everyday sadists."

Sadism is a tendency to take pleasure in other people's pain or discomfort. "

http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/11/tech/web/online-trolls-sadists/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

That's our Donkey: a real asshole!

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