4/20 at Civic Center's Rob Corry doesn't expect crackdown, but will be ready for one

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Big photos and more below.
Last month, we shared a letter sent by Rob Corry, attorney for the 4/20 rally at Civic Center Park, to Mayor Michael Hancock and Denver City Council. The gist: While public pot smoking is nixed by Amendment 64, the measure allows it at home -- and since Civic Center Park is the rally's home, attendees planned to burn some trees, as it were. This unusual assertion was as much a show of bravado as a legal argument, and it provoked threats to block the festival entirely. So Corry has rescinded the letter (see his latest missive below) -- but he isn't backing off lighting up.

As we've reported, the original letter, also shared here, finds Corry taking a shot at "a fringe minority fraction of the Denver City Council," which "has engaged in irresponsibly belligerent threats about an alleged increased Police enforcement of petty offenses this year at the 420 Rally." The document also scoffs at the assertion that Civic Center Park is "an urban 'crown jewel' where parents can take their children to picnic." No families with children picnic there, he allows, because "the only times that park is safe is during permitted events. Otherwise, the City has abdicated any interest in protecting and valuing this space, and has surrendered it."

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A photo from the 4/20 rally at Civic Center Park circa 2012.
In Corry's view, 4/20 is "a Marijuana Holiday," and "attempts to stop such reality would be unwise, wasteful, excessive, unnecessary, potentially dangerous, and would contribute to an erosion of public respect for law enforcement. Denver Police might as well try to stop public consumption of alcohol by tailgaters in the parking lot before a Bronco game. Such would be equally ridiculous and absurd."

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Councilman Charlie Brown at a recent hearing on marijuana banking.
This invective clearly didn't thrill city councilman Charlie Brown, who went off in a February 26 Denver Post article. He suggested that the city respond to the letter by denying a festival permit to rally organizers, even if it means picking a legal fight. "If we're going to take it to court at some point," he told the Post, "we might as well do it this year."

In conversation with Westword, Corry excoriates the Post piece, suggesting that the paper "overplayed its hand -- and I think Charlie Brown probably overplayed his hand as well, by saying the letter would give them the ability to deny the permit -- which it wouldn't."

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Rob Corry at an anti-marijuana taxation rally last year.
At the same time, he recognizes that the letter hadn't accomplished its purpose -- so he sent a followup note rescinding the first one. An excerpt epitomizes the second document's much mellower tone. It reads:
We sincerely apologize if the misinterpretation of our previous letter caused any confusion. Our intent was to clarify, not confuse. Our letter, though inartfully drafted, was a reaction to provocative statements about an alleged Police crackdown this year at 420. We realize now that we should not have taken that bait, and instead should have conducted ourselves on a higher plane.
Will the plane on which the 4/20 rally takes place be lower as a result of Brown's suggested permit denial and a possible court fight? Not if Corry has anything to say about it.

"We're going to proceed in the exact same manner as past years," he says.

Continue for more about the 4/20 rally at Civic Center Park, including more photos and the two letters.



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40 comments
DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

The Police should simply deploy 100s of video cameras and record the entire event in all it's puerility.


The film would would make one of the strongest advertisements AGAINST petulant pot punks.



Pheenix Wonder
Pheenix Wonder

They only go after the peaceful people, that is why it is completely acceptable to get totally wasted on beer downtown 3-4 times a year.

Marcus Netters
Marcus Netters

Damn guess I'm staying in Seattle for hempfest if this is the.. case they give doritos here.

WillieStortz
WillieStortz topcommenter

Denver needs to take a stand and shutdown this embarrassing event.

DontGetScaredNow
DontGetScaredNow

The most dangerous part of last years event was the 'stampede' that followed the shooting. Some air-head chick right next to me screamed 'bomb' and people just started running and screaming without knowing quite why. Dumb-asses....

John Vincent
John Vincent

Why is it a festival? I thought it was a protest. If you are denied the right to protest you are denied the right to be free.

Kevin Kline
Kevin Kline

Yup they aren't going to do shit unless they want a riot.

Rob Payne
Rob Payne

I have been invited, but I know I won't fork out the sub fee. Don't get to play the games I already have, hard to justify monthly. Bad ass though?

Carter Beck
Carter Beck

Hell no last year was sketchy enough

Kevin O'Brien
Kevin O'Brien

Last year was the most disgusting group of idiots in Denver at Civic Center Park. How embarrassing for our city

Monkey
Monkey

"Burn some trees"

I love it! Why is that such a Cali thing to say? And why did the term "tree house", referring to a house with weed growing in it, never catch on in Colorado either? When you say, I'm playing in the tree house, that always means you're tending to the garden, at least in my slang vocabulary. 


Maria Nieto
Maria Nieto

Yes, yes I will. It's finally on a day when I don't have to work.

Stephanie Fast
Stephanie Fast

It would be nice if they would crack down on crack dealers around here.

Nick Runge
Nick Runge

Ok... So now that pot is legal, what the hell is the point of the 420 rally. Fucking idiots.

Jeff Hulsing
Jeff Hulsing

Civic Park is like a second home to me. Great place to take the family for a picnic

James Gold
James Gold

Denver PD threatening a "crackdown" = threats of violence. Denver PD loves to beat people down anytime they get the chance. Why go to this bullshit when you can just smoke at home anyway?

Benjie Robinson
Benjie Robinson

I would think that the lack of enforcement during past gatherings while marijuana use was illegal would set precedent for future gatherings. Especially since the law has changed.

Matt Leising
Matt Leising

Haven't gone to it in a few years. Now it seems to be a bunch of high school kids cutting class for the day and juggalos spraying each other with Faygo. The rally has lost it's feel and no longer represents the movement\

Jason Joyce
Jason Joyce

Yeah, I had a bunch. Still have an extra account if you want to check it out this weekend... they might be doing a few more beta events before launch.

Rob Payne
Rob Payne

The last one I went to, Ken Gorman was still alive. Shared one with him right at 4:20. Damn good experience indeed!

Shox Tha Grotesque
Shox Tha Grotesque

What about the taste of colorado and other event that sell massive amounts of beer downtown.....

Jason Joyce
Jason Joyce

Probably not... I'll probably be grinding end-game ESO for some of that rare loot.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

               Get high in PUBLIC, lose your JOB!


Denver businesswoman Amy Dannemiller created her alter ego Jane West for her cannabis enterprises in October 2013. Her hope: Amy would work her 9-to-5 as an event planner for an unnamed national corporation, Jane would anonymously host her monthly bring-your-own-marijuana dinner parties, and never the twain should meet.


Except the camera-friendly, 37-year-old Jane became a popular face of legal marijuana — and it was a face Amy's East Coast bosses recognized as they saw her vaporize marijuana on NBC Nightly News and the CNBC documentary "Marijuana in America: Colorado Pot Rush" on Feb. 26.


On Feb. 28, the company asked Dannemiller, senior event manager of its western division with a staff of 80, to resign.


"It was curt but polite," said Dannemiller, who has a master's in social work from the University of Denver and still asks that her new friends and colleagues call her Jane. "I violated the drug policy on national television, and that's completely reasonable."


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

An expert on marijuana legalization questioned Corry's interpretation.


"What Amendment 64 made clear is that use in public where (marijuana) could be seen by other people was prohibited," said Sam Kamin, a University of Denver law professor. "What (Corry) is suggesting, while it's a novel theory, probably is not going to go very far."




DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Lawyer and Narc: Attorney Goes Undercover to Help Police Trap His Client


If Chevaliee ”Chevy” Robinson, 35 was unhappy about pleading guilty to drug conspiracy and money laundering in Akron, he was probably even less happy when he learned the identity of the snitch that helped set him up with the police: his lawyer Frank Pignatelli.

Media has learned that Pignatelli found himself implicated in the drug conspiracy and agreed to work undercover with police in stings to incriminate others, including his own former clients. It is an extremely troubling use of a lawyer by law enforcement that the American Bar Association should review.

Pignatelli may have resulted in the arrest of 30 people in Akron and Cleveland and other cities.

Pignatelli, 50, is no longer practicing in Ohio for good reason, but has
 taken up criminal defense work in Denver, including the representation of defendants in drug cases. He has been offered a less sentence for his own actions to support drug dealers. Federal prosecutors reportedly approached Pignatelli to say that they believe he was helping his clients purchase ”stash houses” in which to store drugs and money. Media reports that a search of his home found more than $2.8 million and about 1,000 pounds of marijuana.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

Good double use of "crack," Stephanie. Thanks.

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