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Photos: CU-Boulder's 4/20 closure guards against "chaos," spokesman says

420.cu.boulder.2011.205x205.jpg
Big photos below.
Yesterday, we told you about the decision by administrators at CU-Boulder to close the campus on 4/20 for the third consecutive year; see our previous coverage below.

Presumably, there won't be much going on in the buildings near Norlin Quad (longtime ground zero of 4/20 at CU) on the date, given that April 20 corresponds with Easter Sunday this year -- and last year's closure was a non-event. So why go through the motions again? A CU-Boulder spokesman explains.

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A photo from the pre-2012 era of 4/20 gatherings at CU-Boulder.
"This year, with all the attention on the law in Colorado and retail marijuana becoming legal here, we wanted to continue to secure the academic space against the kind of chaos the event brings," says Bronson Hilliard (disclosure: a friend of yours truly). "And regardless of what happens in the external environments around Colorado and Denver, I think the general feeling is that it's going to take some time to die down completely as something students think about -- and something people from outside the community who come here for 4/20 think about."

At the same time, he continues, "the baseline reasons for doing this really haven't changed. We have faculty using the academic space seven days a week. Laboratories are right nearby and faculty regularly comes in over the weekend to work, to meet with colleagues and many other things. And that's what we're trying to secure without disruption."

420.cu.boulder.campus.wide.shot.jpg
A 2011 shot from the campus.
The first year the campus was closed on 4/20, opponents reacted with a court fight in which the university prevailed -- and on the day itself, the boundary was breached and a handful of protesters were arrested. Year two, in contrast, went without incident.

"The officers who've secured the campus have been great," Hilliard stresses. "We haven't received any formal complaints about their conduct. They've been polite and professional, and so have the other agencies we've partnered with."

As such, a major confrontation this 4/20 seems unlikely, "but just in case, we will be prepared for a number of different scenarios," Hilliard says --including protests from people unhappy about the university enforcing a new no-smoking policy. The latter "has nothing to do with 4/20," he stresses. "We've been working to get no-smoking regulations for ten years, and we're one of the last major universities in the country to come up with this."

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More from 2011.
Hilliard declines to go into detail about law-enforcement plans, but acknowledges that "the general philosophy is the same as last year.

"It's always been part of our strategy on 4/20 that this would be a multi-year process," he continues. "We want to make this thing go away permanently on campus, and we haven't defined how long the horizon is on 'multi-year.' But we always knew it would be three or more years moving ahead."

Continue for our previous coverage of the upcoming campus closure at CU-Boulder, including a gallery of photos from the last big 4/20 event at the university.



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24 comments
Daisy Rothschild
Daisy Rothschild

Well yea, like... Didn't you see Reefer Madness? (you should, really you should....)

Ron Gowins
Ron Gowins

Because they are conservative idiots who don't believe in freedom.

FreeTheWeed
FreeTheWeed

Petulant Pot Punks ruin it for everyone.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Marijuana McLawyer Rob Corry sobers up, withdraws idiotic 4/20 claim


Denver -- An attorney for Denver's 4/20 marijuana rally has "rescinded and withdrawn" a controversial letter that said organizers would sanction public smoking of pot at the event.


But Denver's city attorney on Monday asked organizers to clarify their intentions — by agreeing to notify attendees that toking up would violate the law.


Attorney and activist Robert Corry's original letter, sent to city officials last month, caused a stir. It left in question whether the city will grant a needed permit to use Civic Center for the annual event, planned for April 19-20.


That park permit still is under review while officials consider Corry's correspondence and await answers to new questions, City Attorney Scott Martinez confirmed Monday.


In his letter to Corry, Martinez wrote: "You stated in your February 20 letter that persons could attend the event and publicly consume marijuana with impunity under the auspices of the permit. Do you no longer maintain this position? Please advise."


Colorado's Amendment 64, which legalized the sale and use of recreational marijuana, does not permit consumption of pot in public.


But in the initial letter, Corry wrote that the organizers, once they secured a permit for the park, could allow public smoking.


He cited a part of Amendment 64 that gives any entity that "occupies, owns or controls a property" the power to regulate marijuana use there. A legal expert consulted by The Denver Post questioned Corry's legal interpretation.



Corry should be disbarred for gross malpractice, along with his depraved lack of ethics.



RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

Phil DiStefano's reign of error continues.  I believe that closing the campus of this public university to the public and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars in an effort to forestall celebration of 4/20 detracts from UC's standing far more than any fallout from students using cannabis possibly could.  This twice-convicted drunken driver is steering the University as though his blood alcohol is .2%.  DiStefano -- on his watch, Ward Churchill was hired and then fired, only after he made himself an embarrassment.  What is DiStefano doing to the University's research and teaching?  If Colorado had journalists, perhaps they could try to find out, but it cannot be good.

DontBlowBHO
DontBlowBHO

I doubt if any tears will be shed over this.

Patrick Layman
Patrick Layman

The Facebook page says that it's now being held at the Middle School. IMO, this is a much better location any way. The swing set is fun.

Carl Wlodarczyk
Carl Wlodarczyk

I'm not sure who cares about a pot rally when it's legal now.

Paul Quigley
Paul Quigley

And the world responded with a rousing "meh".

Jim Earl
Jim Earl

Being help hostage must suck CU

Jenny Castaneda
Jenny Castaneda

That's okay we will all be at red rocks with wiz and snoop lion :)

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

... or because Petulant Pot Punks won't even obey the laws THEY WROTE ?

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

You should expect a big crowd, Jose. Thanks.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

@DontBlowBHO  Certainly there won't be any tears from CU's administrators. Thanks for weighing in, DontBlowBHO.

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

Patrick, you are so mature!

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

Interesting viewpoint, Carl. We're going to feature it in an upcoming Comment of the Day. Thanks.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

That's about right, Paul. Thanks for posting.

michael.roberts
michael.roberts moderator editortopcommenter

You won't be alone, Jenny. Thanks for posting.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@DontGetScaredNow ... when you get it declared "un-constitutional" by a court of competent jurisdiction, let us know.


So why did the lying liars and stupid stoners who wrote and promoted that turd A64 explicitly declare that open public use shall not be legal?


... and they put it .... in ... the ... CONSTITUTION!

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