Reader: No proof that pot caused two deaths but plenty that booze has killed thousands

9688455.87.jpg
Our post featuring anti-pot group Smart Colorado branding the recent 4/20 celebration "shocking" attracted comments by the bushel. The following reader focuses on the organization's argument that marijuana may have led to the accidental death of Levy Thamba and the murder of Kristine Kirk.

Rudy Gutierrez writes:

They're stupid they try and argue a point where there have been two deaths but no proof that MJ caused it but thousands of drunk drivers and accidents and people can still drink at a bar. I call BS. If people can drink in bars and ball games etc. then we should be able to smoke, too.

Send your story tips to the author, Michael Roberts.

For more memorable takes, visit our Comment of the Day archive.


Advertisement

My Voice Nation Help
20 comments
John Elliott
John Elliott

Anecdotal at best, since pot hasn't been legal long enough, and thus studied in this way, to make an apples - to - apples comparison. But, you know, continue to laud pot use 'cause, you know, you're all responsible and shit...

RL Walking Encyclopedia
RL Walking Encyclopedia

Stop with this stupid red herring argument. If I ask you about how dangerous pot is, you must answer about how dangerous POT is, not about the relative dangers of other drugs. Learn 2 logic.

Damon Medina
Damon Medina

If it's questionable if you can handle it go get evaluated by a pot Doc. If you have a intolerance or allergic reaction then YOU probably shouldn't do it.

Daniek Lerr
Daniek Lerr

While I *absolutely do not* support prohibition, I still think is kind of misleading. The phrasing "directly killed by" alcohol means that only alcohol poisoning can be counted; no traffic incidents, suicides, fights, murders. IF.. these other factors can be taken into consideration in the count, than the count for MJ, while estimated to be considerably smaller, can not honestly remain at zero. Also, if we continue to have shops in Denver that sell cookies that have to be cut into six pieces, the number will definitely rise. While the physical reaction of edibles overdose is very slight, the psychological reaction is profound.

Sean Hochman
Sean Hochman

No matter what, alcohol is always going to be more dangerous by an astronomical amount. If it's legal pot has to be also

Jonny Cap
Jonny Cap

Maybe not smoking at games and bars but edibles should be allowed for sure.

Bryon A. Henderson
Bryon A. Henderson

Definitely. I mean I'm not a weed smoker, but alcohol, fast-food and cigarette's have all contributed to many deaths in this country as well-- so why keep trying to demonize marijuanna?

Matt Oleson
Matt Oleson

Deaths from marijuana = recreational users unknowning their limits.

Crystal Gerber
Crystal Gerber

Lol OMG pot does not kill people. U can't overdose, and if u smoke a lot it feels great lol

jankempermiller
jankempermiller

Absolutely! If regulations had been followed. like not selling a medical edible to a retail customer, these things would not have happened in the first place. Keep a lid on it folks and play by the rules.

muhutdafuga
muhutdafuga topcommenter

Pot wasn't discovered the day it became legal in Colorado.  Fortunes have been spent over the years trying to prove it harmful.  Nice try sounding all sciency!

The truth is that neither alcohol nor pot are exactly health foods, nor are other intoxicants.  

Sitting in a private prison dedicated to the war on drugs...or is it the war on Americans... isn't especially healthful, either.


priceofaMile
priceofaMile

Maybe a cannibis club would be a good start? A place where adults can go and smoke/drink socially.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@muhutdafuga  


Princeton Study: U.S. No Longer An Actual Democracy


Friday, April 18, 2014


A new study from Princeton spells bad news for American democracy—namely, that it no longer exists.

Asking "[w]ho really rules?" researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page argue that over the past few decades America's political system has slowly transformed from a democracy into an oligarchy, where wealthy elites wield most power.

Using data drawn from over 1,800 different policy initiatives from 1981 to 2002, the two conclude that rich, well-connected individuals on the political scene now steer the direction of the country, regardless of or even against the will of the majority of voters.

"The central point that emerges from our research is that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy," they write, "while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence."

Now Trending

Denver Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

Loading...