Cannabis Time Capsule 1911: Marijuana kills babies!

BABY-GOATCART.jpg
Marijuana? Deadly. Infants on a wagon pulled by a goat? Totally normal.

After a week of what seems like endless Reefer Madness stories from the Denver television stations, we thought we'd leave you with some vintage pot hysteria from 1911.

Yes, in case reports of wild Mexicans wasn't enough to scare the hell out of white America, the thought of it killing babies was sure to do the trick.

This June 1911 piece from the Montezuma Journal out of Cortez is a recap of a "Food Department" report listing a number of "soothing syrups" that were going to be banned as "baby killers." Sadly, the name was probably correct considering the main ingredients in these over-the-counter drugs included morphine, powdered opium and chloroform. But, of course, marijuana gets lumped in among the ingredients for Victor Infant Relief:

CTC-babykiller1911.jpg
The report concludes with this: "All of the above mentioned drugs are pure poisons. The government is doing the right thing in exposing these products but should go still further and not allow them to be placed on the market."

Interestingly, most of the chemicals mentioned remain on the pharmaceutical market today. Meanwhile, cannabis was marginalized and only now is seeing a comeback in the medical field.

We tracked down an image of the Victor Infant Relief from the AntiqueCannabisBook.com site (an awesome resource if you're a cannabis history nerd):

antiquecannabisbookcom-QAVictor.jpg

For more Colorado cannabis history, check out our Cannabis Time Capsule archive.



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24 comments
Branden Major
Branden Major

Tell me about it! ..I feel like making some pancakes now

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Boulder charges 7 with Class 1 FELONY for Marijuana !!


Thirty uniformed and plainclothes Boulder officers swept Central Park on Friday in a sting operation, arresting seven suspects and disbanding what police say was a network of dealers selling marijuana and psychedelic mushrooms.


Police arrested six adults and one juvenile as part of their months-long undercover investigation into the suspected drug ring in downtown Boulder.

Investigators say the suspects sold pot and mushrooms to juveniles and adults. 


Officers say they think the dealers bought their marijuana from a local medical marijuana dispensary.


Those arrested were Jannene Parrish Barrett, 57; Derrick Jordan Marshall Parish, 21; David John Sanderson, 20; Jayson Anthony Seuferer, 32; Jeffrey Daniel Ferriss Sr., 35; Gerald Emery Newman, 29; and a 16-year-old female. 



Barrett, Parish, Sanderson, Newman and Seuferer are facing charges of distributing drugs as part of an organized group and distributing drugs within 1,000 feet of a school, both of which are Class 1 felonies, punishable by eight to 32 years in prison and fines between $5,000 and $1 million.


"We understand the safety concerns of Boulder residents and today's arrests help make the downtown area safer for residents and visitors," interim Boulder police Chief Greg Testa said in a statement. "We won't tolerate this type of criminal activity, and we will continue to target individuals and groups that sell illegal drugs in our community."


Boulder police are still looking for three suspects who have outstanding warrants in connection with the investigation: Bryan Antonie Townsend, 29; Michael James Morton, 57; and an unidentified 17-year-old female. Townsend is also facing Class 1 felony drug charges.


"My office takes a hard stance against those who deal drugs to minors, and those who deal drugs near schools and in the public places in our community, such as is alleged to have occurred here," Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett said in a statement. "My office worked closely with Boulder police, who ran an excellent undercover operation that led to today's arrests."


Class 1 felonies, punishable by eight to 32 years in prison and fines between $5,000 and $1 million.


Class 1 felonies, punishable by eight to 32 years in prison and fines between $5,000 and $1 million.


Class 1 felonies, punishable by eight to 32 years in prison and fines between $5,000 and $1 million.


...



malcolmkyle16
malcolmkyle16

1) Tobacco (only smoked by donkeys) is cancer causing largely because it delivers specific carcinogens such as NNK and NNAL that are not present in cannabis. Not all "tar" is created equal, and tobacco has some of the most carcinogenic types of tar known to science, whereas cannabis does not.


http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/91/14/1194


2) Cannabis (marijuana) use is associated with a DECREASE in several types of cancer... potentially even providing a protective effect against tobacco and alcohol related cancer development.


Donald Tashkin, a UCLA researcher whose work is funded by NIDA, did a case-control study comparing 1,200 patients with lung, head and neck cancers to a matched group with no cancer. Even the heaviest marijuana smokers had no increased risk of cancer, and had somewhat lower cancer risk than non-smokers (tobacco smokers had a 20-fold increased lung cancer risk). Tashkin D. Marijuana Use and Lung Cancer: Results of a Case-Control Study. American Thoracic Society International Conference. May 23, 2006.


Researchers at the Kaiser-Permanente HMO, funded by NIDA, followed 65,000 patients for nearly a decade, comparing cancer rates among non-smokers, tobacco smokers, and marijuana smokers. Tobacco smokers had massively higher rates of lung cancer and other cancers. Marijuana smokers who didn't also use tobacco had no increase in risk of tobacco-related cancers or of cancer risk overall. In fact their rates of lung and most other cancers were slightly lower than non-smokers. Sidney, S. et al. Marijuana Use and Cancer Incidence (California, United States). Cancer Causes and Control. Vol. 8. Sept. 1997, p. 722-728.


"Components of cannabis smoke minimize some carcinogenic pathways whereas tobacco smoke enhances some. Both types of smoke contain carcinogens and particulate matter that promotes inflammatory immune responses that may enhance the carcinogenic effects of the smoke. However, cannabis typically down-regulates immunologically-generated free radical production by promoting a Th2 immune cytokine profile. Furthermore, THC inhibits the enzyme necessary to activate some of the carcinogens found in smoke. In contrast, tobacco smoke increases the likelihood of carcinogenesis by overcoming normal cellular checkpoint protective mechanisms through the activity of respiratory epithelial cell nicotine receptors. Cannabinoids receptors have not been reported in respiratory epithelial cells (in skin they prevent cancer), and hence the DNA damage checkpoint mechanism should remain intact after prolonged cannabis exposure. Furthermore, nicotine promotes tumor angiogenesis whereas cannabis inhibits it."


See:http://www.harmreductionjournal.com/content/2/1/21

malcolmkyle16
malcolmkyle16

An ever-growing body of scientific research clearly demonstrates that Marijuana is less addictive than a cup of tea (donkeys believe otherwise).


http://druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/basicfax5.htm


Dr. Jack E. Henningfield of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and Dr. Neal L. Benowitz of the University of California at San Francisco ranked six psychoactive substances on five criteria.


Withdrawal -- The severity of withdrawal symptoms produced by stopping the use of the drug.


Reinforcement -- The drug's tendency to induce users to take it again and again.


Tolerance -- The user's need to have ever-increasing doses to get the same effect.


Dependence -- The difficulty in quitting, or staying off the drug, the number of users who eventually become dependent


Intoxication -- The degree of intoxication produced by the drug in typical use.


The tables listed below show the rankings given for each of the drugs. Overall, their evaluations for the drugs are very consistent. It is notable that marijuana ranks below caffeine in most addictive criteria, while alcohol and tobacco are near the top of the scale in many areas.


The rating scale is from 1 to 6 --- 1 denotes the drug with the strongest addictive tendencies, while 6 denotes the drug with the least addictive tendencies.



HENNINGFIELD RATINGS


Withdrawal Reinforcement Tolerance Dependence Intoxication


Nicotine 3 4 2 1 5


Heroin 2 2 1 2 2


Cocaine 4 1 4 3 3


Alcohol 1 3 3 4 1


Caffeine 5 6 5 5 6


Marijuana 6 5 6 6 4



BENOWITZ RATINGS


Withdrawal Reinforcement Tolerance Dependence Intoxication


Nicotine 3 4 4 1 6


Heroin 2 2 2 2 2


Cocaine 3 1 1 3 3


Alcohol 1 3 4 4 1


Caffeine 4 5 3 5 5


Marijuana 5 6 5 6 4

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Fast-forward 102 Years -- Marijuana DOES Kill Babies!


Mother sent to prison!


Palisade mom of two toddlers who died guilty on child abuse charge

GRAND JUNCTION — A 12-person jury found Heather Jensen guilty of child abuse that led to the hyperthermia deaths of her two young sons in 2012,

The verdict came after a day and a half of deliberations following an emotional four days of testimony about the events surrounding the deaths of William Jensen, 2, and Tyler Jensen, 4. 


The boys died of overheating while strapped and locked in their mother's SUV on a cold evening in late November.


Jensen had left her sons in her vehicle with the heater on while she smoked marijuana with a man in a nearby vehicle.



Raff
Raff

"The boys died of overheating while strapped and locked in their mother's SUV on a cold evening in late November."

Even the article you copy-paste agrees marijuana didn't kill those boys. Nice try though, you propaganda-pushing Prohibitionist puke.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Raff  ... the innocent children died as a DIRECT RESULT of their Mother's marijuana use.


Ipso facto.

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@Raff  Ruff, 1st mistake - taking the donkey seriously.  

Raff
Raff

You sound like Nancy Grace.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@fishingblues "First:  there is a vast difference between being drunk and being loaded on a little pot."


Not so much for the DEAD victims.


hth.

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay @Raff  


Let's try it again, for the slow kids.  First:  there is a vast difference between being drunk and being loaded on a little pot.

Second:  (Once again) in your analogy, being drunk WOULD NOT be a "direct" cause.  At the most, it might be considered an indirect contributing factor.    

Raff
Raff

Clearly not, judging by your comments.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Raff  


HipTip: Denial isn't just a river in Egypt


hth.

Raff
Raff

No, because it didn't.

You are dense, huh?

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Raff  ... so if an alcoholic got drunk instead, and left their kids alone in a hot car until their little brains baked like a poached egg, you would not admit that the alcohol consumption directly contributed to their deaths?



Raff
Raff

She forgot because of marijuana? Just making shit up now, huh?

Her overal negligence killed the children. Marijuana didn't, regardless of how many times YOU repeat it.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Raff  ... that mother got stoned and forgot her kids, leaving them in an overheated car to die a slow, excruciating death from heat stroke.


Her marijuana use was a DIRECT cause of the DEATHS of those innocent children, same as ALCOHOL is a DIRECT cause of DUI deaths.



Raff
Raff

This woman didn't get stoned and wreck her car. Try again.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Raff  ... so when a drunk driver crashes and kills children, the deaths of those children were not a direct result of alcohol?


Or would a moron like you assert that the Alcohol was "unrelated" to the crash and deaths?


Be specific, and show your work.

Raff
Raff

You clearly don't understand the concepts of "direct" and indirect" (not to mention "unrelated").

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