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Marijuana: Cannabis Business Summit takes debate over pot edibles safety seriously

Categories: Marijuana

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"One" is a new line of low-dose snacks and drinks from Dixie Elixirs.
Between the hotel-room antics of Maureen Dowd and a tragic pot-related tourist death and a fatal shooting earlier this year, marijuana's national image has taken some heavy hits recently. All of those incidents involved edibles -- and like members of any industry, marijuana salespeople (medical and adult-use alike) are concerned about the effect this could have on the potential future viability of their businesses.

But unlike other industries, the marijuana businesspeople in Colorado are hyper-aware that their fortunes could turn on a legal or political dime at any moment. And judging from some of the new products and in-depth discussion at the ongoing Cannabis Business Summit at the Colorado Convention Center, some thoughtful and serious steps are being taken to mitigate the damage done to pot's reputation.

During a morning panel about successes and challenges here and in Washington, Andrew Freedman, the director of marijuana coordination for Governor John Hickenlooper's office, noted that an edibles task force (and a solution to the banking issues that dispensaries face) are priorities for his office. And in a question-and-answer session after the discussion, more than one authority on stage acknowledged that if the nationwide trend toward marijuana legalization can be reversed at this point, the turning point could hinge on edibles. After all, on top of being associated with such high-profile incidents as Dowd's edible nightmare and two deaths, they're also perceived to be inherently appealing to children.

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New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd wrote that edibles packaging should feature a stoned skull and bones.
So greater regulation of edible packaging, dosage and labeling seems inevitable at this point. But before that happens, other areas of the industry are stepping up to offer different solutions, too.

The product manufacturers themselves are seeing a shopper's desire for lower-dose edibles -- and are following through. At the Cannabis Business Summit, Dixie Elixirs rolled out "One," a new line of low-dose products. Each unit is a single-serving, 5 milligram dose of THC. On top of the watermelon cream soda pictured above, they'll also offer coconut water, chocolates and their standby mints.

Considering the past year of media coverage surrounding butane honey oil (BHO) and the often-dangerous extraction process, it's interesting that edibles got most of the stage attention at the event -- although BHO was mentioned more than once, and several vendors offered safe extraction technologies in the exhibit hall. Still, it says something about the national perspective on marijuana when the biggest scares thus far have involved something as innocuous-seeming as edibles -- and it says something else that industry members in Colorado are taking that perspective seriously enough to take steps to protect pot users.

More from our Marijuana archive circa March 12: "Photos: Motel blaze joins our list of top six recent hash-oil explosions."


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22 comments
DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Breaking News!

                 Cannabis use 'genetically linked' to schizophrenia


“Study finds people predisposed to [schizophrenia] and drug users share common genes,” the Mail Online reports. A new study suggests that ‘schizophrenia’ genes are associated with cannabis use.


It has long been known that there is an association between cannabis use and schizophrenia – but the “direction of travel” has been hotly debated.


Does cannabis use trigger the onset of schizophrenia in vulnerable individuals? Or are people with a genetic predisposition to develop schizophrenia more likely to use cannabis than the population at large (possibly as a coping mechanism)?

This latest study suggests that the latter may be the case; at least in some people. The study involved 2,082 healthy adults whose genetic make-up was examined for risk factors for schizophrenia.


People with more genetic risk factors (carrying more of the DNA variants that have been associated with schizophrenia) were more likely to have reported ever using cannabis.


The study was carried out by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London; Queensland Brain Institute and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia; the Department of Developmental Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam;  the Washington University School of Medicine.


The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Molecular Psychiatry

Dan Anglin
Dan Anglin

No proof the guy who killed his wife even used edibles; just that he bought some. No toxicology report released yet. Just manufactured hysteria to bolster an anti-legalized pot agenda. Too bad so many Denver journalists are too lazy to do actual research instead of regurgitating lies designed to scare people.

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

"Between the hotel-room antics of Maureen Dowd and a tragic pot-related tourist death and a fatal shooting earlier this year, marijuana's national image has taken some heavy hits recently."


Many do not share your opinion -- you refer to three recent instances of the prohibitionist corporate media hyping obvious propaganda as though we all believed that nonsense implicitly -- utter BS!  Amber, you seem to have little understanding of the issues at hand, do not seem to grasp that Gov. Hack is a prohibitionist, and seem oblivious to the fact that edibles packaging and dosages are already regulated.  When the industry's lobbyists rolled over on both the concentrates and the edibles bills (HB14-1361 and HB14-1366, respectively), without objection, the industry is not "serious", it's simply wasting its money in ineffectual representation, and adopting a posture of obeisance in the hopes of fending off further legislative backlash.  Having already administratively limited the maximum dose of edibles to 100mg earlier this year, and packaging also already regulated, the edibles bill proposes impractical solutions to a non-existent problem; never mind the packaging, edibles themselves would have to be shaped, colored, or imprinted in some arbitrary way so as to indicate that they contain THC. In that a wide range of foods are infused with cannabis, that no such color; shape; or symbol is now associated with THC, and that edibles are usually removed from their packaging immediately prior to consumption, the edibles bill (now law) accomplishes nothing other than serving as an object lesson that hysteria about cannabis is alive and well in State government.


"After all, on top of being associated with such high-profile incidents as Dowd's edible nightmare and two deaths, they're also perceived to be inherently appealing to children"

-- more of your BS; your article serves as an object lesson that fear-mongering about cannabis is still the modus operandi of the popular media.  Candy and treats are appealing to children, but the packaging of edibles means that children (as opposed to minors who know what edibles are and want to consume them) are not being exposed to them -- there is no marketing to children whatsoever; any exposure of children to edibles' packaging (and edibles themselves) is the responsibility of the adults who purchased them -- get it?


"... it says something else that industry members in Colorado are taking that perspective seriously enough to take steps to protect pot users" -- and you conclude on a really nauseating note:  the industry cares, as you would have it.  There are no significant problems with edibles, with regard to their potency, labeling, or even public perception, as much as the media seek to drum them up.  There is no task for the task force, and no solution to the non-problem you have posed (except that it might help not to join the chorus of media sheep bleating what the Establishment wants us to believe).  The next time you write an article about edibles (for I am afraid you might), please apprise yourself of the extant laws and regulations regarding them instead of blithering on about imaginary problems and the even more fantastic solutions proposed for them (if you read HB14-1366 with understanding, you should be able to understand what I mean).  The edibles task force is nothing but a prohibitionist propaganda organ, and the industry's commitment to it, nothing but political grovelling.  I might remind you that the Department of Revenue and its Marijuana Enforcement Division already have regulatory authority over infused products -- their manufacture, packaging, and sale -- were you to take an interest in legal and regulatory reality, you should see the DOR's website and published rules (after you consult the statutes).

WillieStortz
WillieStortz topcommenter

" On top of the watermelon cream soda pictured above,"

Watermelon cream soda. Tell me again how they are not targeting these towards kids....I haven't heard enough bullshit yet today. 

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

                    Regulation Works!


      Get REGULATED, Bitches! -- you begged for it!



RallyTour
RallyTour

@DonkeyHotay "Or are people with a genetic predisposition to develop schizophrenia more likely to use cannabis than the population at large (possibly as a coping mechanism)?


This latest study suggests that the latter may be the case; at least in some people."


That people with mental disorders self-medicate with things like cannabis, alcohol and other drugs isn't "breaking news". 


It is not even "news". 

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@RobertChase


Damn bobbie, you are certainly full of yourself.  You don't honestly believe anyone would read such a tedious and windy dissertation regardless of its potential?  

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@WillieStortz Nitwit!  Adults like sweets too; there is absolutely nothing in the form of edibles that indicates any attempt to market them to children, but the issue is totally irrelevant -- edibles are only sold to adults, in stores in which children are not allowed.  Children are exposed to alcoholic beverages in stores every day; children are never exposed to edibles in stores.  You must be an imbecile to suggest that edibles manufacturers are "targetting" children -- when the only way they can ever see such product is if irresponsible purchasers let them!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@RallyTour ... so you admit that a large portion of stoners are Mentally Ill.


Noted.

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@fishingblues  I know what I am talking about, and people who want to understand, or think they already understand, our laws and politics as they relate to cannabis often do read what I write.

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay  There is a significant distinction between the markets in cannabis and tobacco -- minors have nearly free access to tobacco because of widespread disregard for the law proscribing transfer of this deadly, addictive to minors -- on the part of retail tobacco outlets!  In contradistinction, while much cannabis is being sold illegally to minors, none of it is being sold by retail cannabis outlets.  The claim that either cannabis or tobacco is being marketed to children when no advertising for either is now allowed is questionable.

RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@Ewes Yet here you are (whoever you are) to make that nonsensical assertion -- in response to one of my posts!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Ewes ... and I only do so in order to disabuse him of the habitual errors and mistakes he makes.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@RobertChase ... you just make up whatever bullshit fills the void in your ignorance, don't you?


The primary source of cigarettes for underage smokers is via older friends / family members who divert it to them.


The primary source of marijuana for "underage" users is again from some friend, family or acquaintance who is older, whether they obtain it from the regulated or unregulated market channels.


The utter Puerility of the Cannabis Clown Circus clearly indicates that a significant portion of the market is those under 21 ... or those psycho-emotionally stunted to that age.


So tell us again why rec. Marijuana is so Harmful and Dangerous that NO ONE under 21 should be allowed ANY LEGAL ACCESS to it, under Penalty of Criminal LAW!



Ewes
Ewes

@DonkeyHotay @Ewes

"... and I only do so in order to disabuse him of the habitual errors and mistakes he makes."


Don't lie. Anyone can see you you do it for the attention -- attention from Robert Chase, of all people. Between the two of you, it is hard to tell who is more pathetically desperate for any type of human contact.


:/


RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay  I believe you are mistaken -- many minors in Denver are sold tobacco illegally directly by retailers.  Will you ever tire of asking questions that insinuate lies?

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Ewes ... what makes you so sure there are two of us?



DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@RobertChase "many minors in Denver are sold tobacco illegally directly by retailers"


How many?


Good thing it isn't a Class 1 FELONY, eh?



RobertChase
RobertChase topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay  I use my real name when I post, I am something of a public figure, and my likeness has appeared here, elsewhere on the Web, and in print -- you are a cypher.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@RobertChase "use my real name when I post"


PROVE you are the "real" Robert Chase.



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