Asking Aurora Victims to Control Emotions When Testifying is "Insulting," Prosecutors Say

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A screen capture from a video of the makeshift memorial for the shooting victims.
Update: Prosecutors in the James Holmes case say it's "unprecedented," "insulting" and "unnecessary" for the judge to tell victims of the Aurora theater shooting to control their emotions while testifying at the trial of James Holmes, the accused gunman. Holmes's defense attorneys filed a motion last week asking Judge Carlos Samour to do just that.

Continue to read more about Holmes's original motion and prosecutors' response.

See also: James Holmes Trial Can Be Televised, Judge Rules, But No TV Cameras in Courtroom

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Report: Aurora's Response to Theater Shooting Saved Lives But Better Communication Needed

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The Aurora theater where the shooting took place.
This may be one of the most important conclusions in a review of Aurora's response to the July 2012 theater shooting: "No one died who could have been saved."

However, the report does point out that several aspects of the police, fire, paramedic and public information response were problematic or could have been handled better. Among the biggest: Communication between the police and fire department command staff was inadequate. For example, fire personnel didn't know that a suspect had been arrested

Continue for a summary of the key points, as well as the full report.

See also: James Holmes Trial Can Be Televised, Judge Rules, But No TV Cameras in Courtroom

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James Holmes Trial Can Be Televised, Judge Rules, But No TV Cameras in Courtroom

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Andy Cross/Denver Post
The courtroom where the trial will take place as it appeared in June 2013.
The media can broadcast the trial of accused Aurora theater shooter James Holmes, the judge in the case has ruled. But the television stations won't be able to set up their own camera in the courtroom, as they'd requested. Instead, they'll be allowed to broadcast footage captured by a closed-circuit camera mounted to the courtroom ceiling.

Judge Carlos Samour explained why he's allowing the trial to be televised in an order on view below: "While the media can generally serve as the public's surrogate, members of the public should have the opportunity to see firsthand their justice system at work."

See also: Televising James Holmes Trial Would Be Bad for Victims and Witnesses, Lawyers Argue

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Videos: Seven Colorado Active-Shooter Incidents Featured in New FBI Report

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Matthew John Murray, the shooter at a 2007 incident at New Life Church in Colorado Springs in which four people were killed. Videos and more below.
The FBI has just released a new report about active-shooter incidents between 2000 and 2013, and results are particularly dire. The bureau finds that the number of these tragedies escalated and became more deadly over this span.

A total of 160 crimes fit the FBI's active-shooter parameters, with seven of them taking place here. Of the latter, many of them will be instantly familiar to most readers, including the one with the most casualties in the entire country: the 2012 Aurora theater shooting. However, several others are little remembered at this point -- a sad testimony to how common such attacks have become. Continue to get details and see videos about each one, as well the complete report.

See also: Columbine to Newtown: A Tragic List of School Shootings Since 1999

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Televising James Holmes Trial Would Be Bad for Victims and Witnesses, Lawyers Argue

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James Holmes's first court appearance in 2012 was televised.
Will televising the trial of accused Aurora theater shooter James Holmes lead to more harassment of victims and witnesses than if the trial isn't broadcast?

That's one of the main questions Judge Carlos Samour has to consider in deciding whether to allow a video camera and a still camera at Holmes's trial, which is set to begin December 8. At a hearing Monday, attorneys for the TV and print media argued in favor of allowing so-called expanded media coverage of the trial. But state prosecutors and Holmes's attorneys see it as a bad idea that will cause more problems.

See also: James Holmes Case: 9News on Why It Wants to Televise Aurora Theater Shooting Trial

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Jessica Ghawi's Parents Sue Firms That Sold Ammo and More to Aurora Theater Shooter

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Jessica Ghawi. Additional photos and more below.
Fledgling broadcaster Jessica Ghawi was among twelve people who lost their lives in a July 20, 2012 attack by gunman James Holmes at the Aurora Century 16 theater. Another 58 people were injured.

Now, Ghawi's parents, Sandy and Lonnie Phillips, in conjunction with the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, are suing several companies that sold Holmes ammunition and other gear. The central assertion: The businesses don't bother to check if buyers like Holmes are possibly homicidal. See the complaint plus additional photos and details below.

See also: Aurora Theater Shooting at The Dark Knight Rises: Jessica Ghawi, Radio Intern, ID'd as Victim

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James Holmes Case: 9News on Why It Wants to Televise Aurora Theater Shooting Trial

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Andy Cross/Denver Post
Should the trial of Aurora theater shooting gunman James Holmes be televised?

Television station KUSA has asked the judge's permission to set up a single video camera in the courtroom during Holmes's trial, which is scheduled to begin December 8. KUSA would share the footage with six other television stations and one radio station. Holmes's attorneys object to the request, arguing that broadcasting the proceedings could intimidate witnesses, unduly influence jurors and mislead viewers.

See also: What Happens When Accused Killers Plead Insanity?

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James Holmes case: Prosecutors clarify that victims can talk to defense if they want

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James Holmes and defense attorney Tamara Brady in 2012.
Prosecutors in the James Holmes case have sent an e-mail to victims clarifying that they are allowed to speak to Holmes's attorneys if they want. Judge Carlos Samour ordered prosecutors to send the e-mail (on view below) after defense attorneys complained that prosecutors were discouraging victims from talking to them and to a victim liaison they hired. In an e-mail sent to victims in May, a prosecutor wrote that the liaison's role is to "find Victims who will help the Defendant" -- which Holmes's attorneys say isn't true.

See also: James Holmes trial now scheduled to begin December 8

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James Holmes's second sanity evaluation can be videotaped, judge rules

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Andy Cross/Denver Post
James Holmes in court in June 2013.
The psychiatrist tasked with evaluating Aurora theater shooting suspect James Holmes to determine if he was insane at the time of the crime will be allowed to videotape the examination, according to a recent ruling by Judge Carlos Samour (on view below).

See also: What happens when accused killers plead insanity?

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James Holmes trial now scheduled to begin December 8

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Andy Cross/Denver Post
James Holmes and defense attorney Daniel King in court in June 2013.
The trial of Aurora theater shooting suspect James Holmes is now scheduled to begin on December 8. Judge Carlos Samour set that date at a hearing today over objections from Holmes's attorneys, who argued that it wouldn't give them enough time to analyze a second sanity evaluation of Holmes that's due by October 15. "If we have to adjust, we'll do it," Samour said -- though he insisted on keeping the December trial date.

Also discussed at today's hearing was whether the psychiatrist tasked with completing that second sanity evaluation should be allowed to videotape the exam.

See also: James Holmes videotaped 24 hours a day, seven days a week since his arrest, letter says

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