Washington Park beer ban decision expected soon -- but why do we even have 3.2 beer?

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April is here, and Denver's parks are abuzz -- but not because of daffodils, robins and honeybees. Rather, it's our First World right to get buzzed -- whether it's with booze or with pot -- in these public places that has people springing into action. And while the 4/20 Rally in Civic Center has its own set of issues, a major booze battle could reach its peak today or tomorrow in Washington Park, where City Councilman Chris Nevitt wants to ban beer for six months after complaints from neighbors about boozy behavior reached the point of overflow.

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Scott Gessler's emergency election rule shot down by Colorado Supreme Court

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Gessler on Westword's cover.
Secretary of State Scott Gessler overstepped his bounds when he issued an emergency rule on election night in November 2013 declaring that votes cast for ineligible candidates are invalid and shouldn't be counted, the Colorado Supreme Court ruled this week.

In a legal challenge brought by eight voters in the Adams 12 Five Star School District, the high court sided with the voters, finding that Gessler's rule conflicts with a state law that says such votes "are to be counted and recorded."

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Denver Public Schools is getting rid of good teachers, says rep behind here-and-gone bill

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This week's feature, "Wrong Answer," tells the stories of five Denver teachers who've sued the school district for essentially getting rid of them even though they've never gotten a bad review. How? By following a procedure laid out in a provision in the state's landmark 2010 teacher-effectiveness law -- a provision that the teachers and the teachers union believe is unconstitutional. Some state lawmakers agree, and two of them introduced a bill in February aimed at changing that provision. But this week, the bill's main sponsor asked that his own bill be killed.

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Drug-endangered child bills won't automatically criminalize pot-using parents, senator says

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Photos and more below.
In last week's marijuana legislative roundup, our William Breathes referenced two bills about drug endangered children that he said "could arguably make all cannabis-using parents criminals."

He's not alone in this belief. But Senator Linda Newell, a Littleton Democrat, insists that nothing could be further from the truth. And on the eve of the legislation reaching the Senate Judiciary committee, she wants to set the record straight.

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Photos: Top five things marijuana tourist Michael Hancock will learn visiting Amsterdam

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Big photos below.
Denver mayor Michael Hancock isn't the likeliest marijuana tourist. Recall that he ripped Amendment 64. Nonetheless, he and other Denver city officials will visit Amsterdam next week in part to learn more about the city's approach to weed.

Apparently, Hancock and company haven't heard of this little thing called the Internet. But we're to help. Here are the top five things Hancock can expect to learn during his trip, largely culled from the official websites for Amsterdam and the Netherlands.

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Mike Dunafon's possible run for governor could be good for Libertarians -- and strippers

Categories: Politics

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Mike Dunafon's Facebook pic.
Libertarian politics in Colorado have always been among the most fun to watch. After all, the nation's third-largest political party was founded in Colorado Springs 42 years ago and has attracted all kinds of colorful characters, from Lakewood City Councilman Doug Anderson, who became the first Libertarian elected to office in a major city in 1987, to Christine Smith, the John Denver-loving candidate who ran for president six years ago. But Glendale mayor Mike Dunafon may top them all if he runs for governor.

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Washington Park alcohol ban pushed to address "belligerent drunken behavior"

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Photos and more below.
Washington Park is without question one of Denver's favorite parks. But is this status endangered by the bad behavior associated with alcohol?

That's among the assertions made in a letter by Denver City Councilman Chris Nevitt, who's calling for a ban on alcohol in the park.

Continue for more information, including some push-back from a prominent Wash Park organization.

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Denver's a "liberal sh*thole"? Maybe, but it still could host the 2016 Republican convention

Categories: Politics

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Photo and more below.
Update: Earlier today, we noted that the Republican National Committee was on the cusp of determining the finalist sites to host the Grand Old Party's 2016 convention. Denver was one of eight contestants -- and a short time ago, the Mile HIgh City made the final cut, along with Cleveland, Cincinnati, Las Vegas, Dallas and Kansas City. (Phoenix and Columbus, Ohio were eliminated.) Denver's accomplishment will make some of those who posted on the RNC Facebook page happy, but plenty more displeased. See the ten most memorable posts in our previous coverage below.

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Miguel Ali Hasan on politics, sex addiction, his new movie and his name changes

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"Should I write movies or work for a production company?" a fresh-faced Miguel Ali (formerly Miguel Ali Hasan) asked his professor, John Badham, the director of Short Circuit and Saturday Night Fever. Badham replied: "Go get some life experience. It will make you a better director." So Ali did: He founded Muslims for Bush; he ran for Colorado House District 56 and almost won; he ran for state treasurer and did not almost win; he survived three months of treatment for sex addiction. Armed with new-found knowledge about how the world works, Ali wrote and directed a feature comedy about his experience as a sex addict. The film, Confessions of a Womanizer, plays today and Sunday, March 30 at the Vail Film Festival.

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It's Scott Gessler v. Jim Wheeler in "March Badness" matchup

Categories: Politics

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Scott Gessler.
It's March Madness time, when everyone decides to create their own Sweet Sixteen matchups for everything from movies to hot dog condiments.

And speaking of hot dogs, Progress Now's 22 state affiliates have tapped twenty politicians that they consider the "most outrageous, radical, out of touch right-wingers" for their "March Badness" contest. And guess what? Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler, our own Honey Badger, makes the cut, facing off against Nevada Assemblyman Jim Wheeler in a round that runs through tomorrow.

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