A Love Letter to Denver, the City I'm Getting to Know

Categories: Neighborhoods

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Brandon Marshall
A toast to Colorado, and its endlessly flowing craft beers.
"As we watch our Queen City of the Plains explode with new people, new businesses and a new cultural identity we aren't familiar with," writes Bree Davies in her recent love letter to Denver, "I feel a shared level of discomfort at the way our visual history is being erased....In response, I've decided to write a letter to the city I love and the place she used to be."

And in response to that, I've decided to write my own love letter to Denver -- from a non-native, a transplant, someone who's found a home she loves...by choice.

See also: A Love Letter to Denver, the City I Used to Know

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Danielle Lirette
Welcome to LoDo, or Wrigleyville West.
Dear Bree:

I'm sorry you think we took over your city. We only did so because it's so great. How long did you genuinely think you could hide the amazing natural wonders here? (Mountains are hard to conceal.) You say you're a member of a "not-so-secret club" of natives, but I have yet to come across anyone with this badge of honor you reference. Are all the natives hiding somewhere far, far away from the ubiquitousness of LoDo (Wrigleyville West, as I like to call it)? Because if so, I would really like to peel back the iron curtain and get to know the real Denver - if you let us, of course.

To your point, though, I'd argue we're a large part of the reason Denver has grown into something so prosperous. All those lists this city is topping? That's partially because of us. We are making this city flush with talent, money and dreams. When I moved here a year ago, no one even knew what RiNo was. The fact that an entire new hip neighborhood seemingly popped up overnight -- we're the ones that made that happen. It took tremendous foresight and city planning, yes, but we're the ones who populated it and brought it to fruition. The dream was yours - the reality, we get to share.

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courtesy rivernorthart.com
Patrick Kane McGregor and crew finishing RiNo's mascot mural.
I'm not from here, but I am so proud of this city and wish Chicago would take a cue. Denver is what all big cities should strive to emulate. The way to increase revenue isn't speed cameras, insane taxes and being all-around dicks. I'm from the Midwest, where people supposedly have values, but the only people talking to you on the street are the homeless begging for money and the creeps on the el. Denver's far from perfect (homeless island and a serious lack of public transportation), but it's a hell of a lot closer.

There's rarely a day when someone doesn't say "hi" to you on the street with a smile -- if not everyone we pass. Friendly, approachable, unpretentious. A city that is booming and creative from a hotbed of IT startups and entrepreneurship to a legal drug that everyone has made way too big a fuss about. When I see headlines back home like "72 shot overnight," my heart breaks. When I was leaving, I didn't even feel safe taking the shortcuts in my own neighborhood. What kind of community is that? Colorado gets its crazies, but for the most part the "violence" is broken car windows and rowdy bar patrons. People take their aggression out on the mountains, on the trails and on the range. It's a wholeheartedly healthier place to be -- mind, body and soul.

It's hard to have a bad day when you can look up and see 300 days of blue skies. What is there to stress about? People see the bigger picture and get what really matters. It's a place where work-life balance isn't an urban legend. Even sitting in traffic isn't as bad when you have the mountains to stare at instead of the schmuck in front of you. The descent from Louisville to Boulder still takes my breath away.

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Britt Chester
Colorado was the healthiest state for a reason.
It's also 1000 times cleaner. People actually take responsibility to make the place they live look beautiful. If City Park is the "Shitty Park," you guys have it good -- seriously. Sure, there's the occasional bad apple who doesn't pick up after their dog, but OMG: You have apartments that allow dogs. Those are tough to find in other cities without $1,000 deposits -- if you can find them at all. Maybe some of you "natives" should try living some place else for a while so you have a baseline for comparison. For you, Denver may seem outrageously expensive, but to me, $1 parking and free on Sundays is virtually unheard of. After paying upwards of $30/hour in downtown Chicago (and many other cities), this is more than reasonable.

You don't get to pick where or how you grow up, and I should've have to apologize for that. I also can't help that I started a chain reaction: Everyone who visits me wants to move here because once you know, it's impossible to forget.

I'll admit, everything we bring to the table isn't good. I'm sure my Midwesterners played a big part in Colorado no longer being the "skinniest state." It's a full-on lifestyle change, and one I swore to make when I moved here. The creative uses of quinoa and kale never cease to amaze, but we really do need more food diversity than farm-to-table, Mexican and Vietnamese. However, with a record forty new restaurants in July, and diverse backgrounds, tastes and interests pouring in, we'll get there.

It's a blessing in disguise that Denver has so much space to expand -- to grow outward instead of upwards. The sky's the limit in terms of potential. That doesn't just have to mean chains and big boxes (although a few more grocery stores and late-night delivery never hurt anyone). My hood has plenty of character with shops I never would've thought up myself, from a kombucha pour-station to Chocolate Rx. It's all local and started by people who decided to risk it all on their lifelong dream, right here, because Denver gave them the courage to plant their roots.

So let's agree to share Denver -- because we're not going anywhere, and there is plenty of love to go around. It's melding into something even greater than it already was because we're bringing the best parts of our hometowns with us. (You're welcome for all the deep-dish pizza.) It's peaking but nowhere near the pinnacle, so let's embrace how seemingly endless the potential is together.

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Elyse Mitchell



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73 comments
padmathornlyre
padmathornlyre

Dear Lauren, as a Colorado native (well, not really, since I'm neither Ute nor Arapahoe nor Jicarilla Apache) of immigrant descent (Ukrainian, Dutch and Austrian Jew, and Irish Catholic), I just want to say, "Welcome home." 


Please understand, though, that "growing outward" (as you wrote, and lovingly) always, and inevitably means, destruction of fragile ecosystems in a semi-arid land. Anyone who grows Kentucky blue grass in their yard should be sent back to Kentucky. Water-gobbling plants like that don't belong here. I remember when the drive from South Denver to Castle Rock was a long one, and lovely, with scrub oak "forests" as far as the eye could see (until they bumped up against a mountain, that is). Highlands Ranch was really a ranch. It belonged to the Phipps family, who owned the Denver Broncos almost from the beginning, until the 1980s.


Colorado's history is incredibly rich. You should check it out. Sometimes, too, it's ugly. The Ludlow Massacre occurred here, but it led to the formation of child-labor laws that remain in place today. The Sand Creek Massacre also occurred here. It marked the real beginning of the Plains Wars that "ended" at Wounded Knee, a 20-year genocide that marginalized indigenous Plains peoples into reservations that today can only be called Third World.


On the other hand, the Colorado voters, following the lead of soon-to-be-Governor Dick Lamm nixed hosting the 1976 Winter Olympics here, because we knew the environmental damage would be too severe, and God (or Goddess!) knows we LOVE the Rocky Mountains! I also remember Dick Lamm worrying that the Front Range from Ft. Collins to Pueblo was destined to become one long, messy megalopolis ... well? Look at then and now, and tell me it ain't so.

Denver for (I think) 24 years was represented in the US House of Representatives by a woman named Patricia Schroeder. At her forced retirement (because the voters passed a term-limit law), she was the longest-serving woman to have ever served in Congress; she had been the first woman ever to sit on the House Armed Services Committee, and the first woman ever to chair the House Armed Services Committee.


Did you know that Boulder was the first community in the country to outlaw smoking in grocery stores?


Did you know that the Colorado Shakespeare Festival was only the third company in the USA and only the 7th worldwide, to have performed the entire canon of The Bard's plays?


Did you know that the Denver Center for Performing Arts (DCPA) was one of only three cities in the world (along with London and Athens) to host productions of "Tantalus," a ten-hour play that the pundits said would certainly flop–but sold-out nearly every performance?


My favorite memory of Denver, over the roughly 15 years I lived on Capital Hill? Pope John Paul II (J2P2) hanging out at the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception at Colfax and Logan ... only two blocks west of Kitty's. The Sacred and the Profane only a stoplight apart. Let's hope they're never further away than that.

jenn08
jenn08

I feel like this article should be titled "How Much I Hate my Old City and Want to Ruin My New One"


I'll go ahead and raise my hand as a native Coloradoan who has been here for 34 years. Yes, we do exist. Sometimes it helps getting out of your newly developed, gentrified "hip (aka white-washed)" neighborhood to find us. 


New and shiny doesn't always mean that it's good or beneficial for a community. I think learning about Colorados's history, general ethics, and ethical city planning would help this author before writing about a city she's new to and seems to only enjoy activities that elitist, culturally ignorant people enjoy (notice her multiple articles on brunching). Oh, so I guess several cultural classes would probably help this person too. 


So, I guess welcome and thank you for turning our once super awesome city that had decent rent, neighborhoods with character into one that places value on kicking out mom and pop shops for yoga studios, kombucha bars, and wino painting classes. By the way, people like you are the reason why Chicago's rents (and now ours) are so expensive. 

Susan Donlan Roy
Susan Donlan Roy

Lauren- Two things (because you sound fun); 1. Find the fields and start a coed softball league (if there isn't already one), 2. Whatever your passion, found a cool non-profit, people would probably love to work with/for you. Something FUN!!

FromAnotherCowtown
FromAnotherCowtown

I was born in Kansas City, went to college in Texas, stopped in Oklahoma, and moved to Denver for a job in 1993. I've lived here ever since. Some of those places mentioned in the first article came and went during the last 21 years. Others were gone before I arrived. I have respect for this town as a place that existed before I arrived. I've taken time to learn its history. Do you know why there is a piece of Morrison Road below Colfax near Mile High, another piece in Westwood, and another piece that actually goes to Morrison? Have you heard of Hop Alley? Do you know who the Smaldones were? Do you know who links Silverado Savings and Loan with John Hinckley, Jr.?


While the rising real estate prices have been good for those of us fortunate to have high-paying jobs (thanks, oil and gas business!), it's certainly not been a picnic for everybody. People from outside often seem to think they are doing Denver a favor by moving here. "More food diversity"? Really? I guess I'm just old and don't understand why overpriced restaurants are important. Oh, wait, I just said it: being able to eat out at a variety of expensive restaurants is a class signifier! NOW I get it! You like Colorado because it's a good place for people with money to mingle with other people with money. The new Aspen art museum is an extreme example: about $100 million contributed by people who don't even live there, but want to say that they own a 2nd/3rd/4th house in a town with a "world-class" museum. Who cares what's actually in it, they have let the world know how wealthy they are.


This city and state existed before you or I moved here (I visited twice as a kid, and I still remember the award-winning mechanical mini golf course in downtown Grand Lake). People have always come here wanting to transform it (see Cheesman, Brown, et al.), and bringing in new settlers has always been the goal of the Powers That Be (ask an Arapaho about that). But that doesn't make what Denver was less than what it is now. If the lack of a good Uruguayan restaurant is a serious deficit, than how did any of our grandparents survive (unless they lived in Uruguay...).


TL;DR I'll direct you to http://www.edquillen.com, the late native curmudgeon whose writing taught me so much about this fascinating state.

Sierra Horton
Sierra Horton

I understand where the writer of this piece is coming from. I'm not a native. I'm nowhere close to a native; I just moved here in May after graduating from college. And when I first moved to Colorado for a summer sub-lease in Boulder, two of my roommates were natives. And they were so proud of their state, of their nativeness, that it sometimes felt as if they brought it up so frequently to let me know that no matter how long I lived here, I would never have the same connection to Colorado as they do. And they are right. My nativeness belongs to Missouri because even though I wasn't born there, that's where I have spent the majority of my life. And I wish I had half the sense of pride they have about Colorado about Missouri, but I don't. I could wax about all the things that make St. Louis great that "non-natives" wouldn't understand. And many St. Louisians do. From our where did you go to high school question to fried ravioli, from our sacred institutions like the Muny and Ted Drewes to our hidden gems like the City Museum and Castlewood State Park, we rave about our hometown. But that was never my style. Instead, I chose to take people around the city I know so well and show them what makes and made my city great. I share in the experiences which made me love St. Louis, the problems that embarrass and hurt me in St. Louis (hello, Ferguson shooting and riots), and the places that have disappeared since I started growing up. I appreciated Bree Davies letter for that reason, but I need more than a list to share in why natives have so much pride. I need a community that embraces me, takes me on a ride and explains why Denver is their city, despite its issues, despite us immigrants. I understand the nostalgia and the pride Colorado natives have for their state and their cities (in this case, Denver). What I don't understand is the alienation put upon those of us who chose to leave our homes and try to make new ones here. We might want to help to preserve this culture Bree insisted we were erasing. But you'll never know when some (not all) of you natives continue to push us away. Stop pushing us out, saying we don't understand your culture, and educate us. Stop berating us, telling us we have no respect (because I know quite a few of us do), and teach us. Engage us. Show us. We're open to the possibilities. TL;DR: Denver natives, I just want a hug.

dyjital
dyjital

I do kind of look forward to all of you yuppies losing all your overpriced furniture to bed bugs though.

dyjital
dyjital

You missed the point entirely. 

All of those great new start up companies are charging twice as much as the company that it replaced.  All those great rent prices you think are so cheap? They are only cheap to someone whose used to paying draconian levels of rent from a huge metropolis like Chicago. Its not so cheap when you went from renting a 2 bedroom 1 bath apartment with utilities paid for 750 a month less than 5 years ago, to suddenly paying 1000 dollars a month for a bed bug infested studio. 


Sure it may look better to someone who can afford to enjoy it. Not all of us get enough free time off to enjoy ski trips (nor enough money). Not all of us can afford a decent enough vehicle to drive up to the mountains. I for one, being a native, moved to downtown denver specifically to get away from people like you. The kind of folks that are bogging down our highways because they feel the need to work an hour away from home and commute into downtown on the roads my tax dollars helped build. The people that come here on the weekends to enjoy our local charm and then skip out when it comes time to go back to the safety of the highlands (or highlands ranch for that matter). 


Not to mention the pot tourism has been quite the double-edged sword. Sure its brought in a lot of tax dollars and for that I'm grateful. Its also brought in a ton of idiot kids who want to get hammered and flood up our transit system with their frequent trips to the dispensaries, sporting events and "gastro-pubs". They come here and they not only flood the town but trash it and treat the locals like crap because they have no respect for it.

They all just think its a cute little show that we put on for them. 


I'll have you know that yet another business of 27 years (Fashion Nation) was forced to close its doors due to rising rental costs and has to move to a completely different area nowhere near its client base. 


Part of what annoys us is how popular denver has become. Part of what is ruining denver is how it keeps ending up on all of these "10 best places to live" lists. I remember when people thought this was a crappy cow town with a football team no one cared about and I was always trying to defend it, at least when it deserved defending. 


But now that we've made Denver properly safe for wealthy white suburbanites its just the best place ever isn't it? Sorry, but I actually miss the grime and the dirt and the cheap rent and the OLD SANTA FE Art Walk where every other block there were kids who rented out their own warehouse spaces to host amazing underground electronic music and had street galleries hosting art from kids off the street. I don't consider the current offerings of Cliche Native American paintings, created by spoiled rich housewives trying to "discover themselves" and douchey hipsters strumming the same tired old acoustic songs on their guitars to be equivalent to that rare experience you have of wandering into a dark warehouse at midnight to see mind altering music, fashion and art. 

All of the people that made this city great have left, because they can't afford to live here anymore. The've all been pushed out to Aurora, Littleton, Stapleton and Centennial and the once tight knit community we had was pretty much laid to waste so we could pave way for yet another totally pointless microbrewery or sports bar. 

I've also had to go from working all my life less than a mile from my home (another reason I live in downtown) to having to commute all the way up to the Tech Center every morning just to find work. I've proudly not owned a car for most of my adult life because I considered it to be wasteful and unnecessary. Now it would seem I'm forced into a situation where if I don't want to deal with an hour commute each way (even longer if the stupid broncos or rockies are playing) I'm forced into shelling out insurance and gas money. All this so you can come an enjoy this town that is slowly conforming to your needs and kicking the rest of us out. 

There's a reason you can't find many natives around here anymore. They can't afford to live here anymore. You'd be surprised how hard it is to find a stable job when you've succesfully owned your own art gallery or small coffee shop but suddenly have to work at a call center for 10.00 an hour because you got bought out by Starbucks. 


Sorry But I find this article insulting. It also confirms what I've always believed, which is many of the people of "new denver" have nothing much to offer other than congestion, high rent prices and naivete. 


PS - Nicolos has amazing Deep Dish Pizza and had it way before you ever showed up. But you wouldn't know anything about that would you?


Ken Arkind
Ken Arkind

The more I read this the angrier I get. It's so incredibly ignorant. You are bringing up actual social issues that aren't addresses in Bree Davies amazing article and making yourself look worse.

Ken Arkind
Ken Arkind

Can you afford to live in Brooklyn still?

mondogarage
mondogarage

"When I moved here a year ago, no one even knew what RiNo was."


I'm not a native (been here 9 years), but I have to call a small amount of bullshit.  It's the loft-dwellers of RiNo who ensure that things like live rock music on the Meadowlark patio can't happen anymore.  It's the baseball cap wearing bros from Chicago who infest Baker with Rock Social.


I've been to Wrigleyville.  As a tourist, it's fun. But LoDo is Wrigleyville, and aside from LoDo being a nice place to keep plastics containerized in their sanitized Tilted Kilt's and Jackson's sports bars, it's otherwise best left alone.


Like Gerard P, said, "Also, it's OK if you move here from elsewhere, just don't act like a dick." 

Joseph Nofrendo Mezey
Joseph Nofrendo Mezey

Westword apparently loves stirring the pot after Coco Davies's article "A Love Letter to Denver, The City I Used To Know". The fact that Lauren Monitz only mentions LODO and RiNo opposed to the myriad of places Bree listed is a testament to how un-cultured some of the transplants to this state are. I don't know Lauren, but it seems like she's speaking from a single gal no family perspective where Bree was trying to reminisce about the family aspects and communities that raised us here from infant to adulthood. You know what's great about Denver now? I'll tell you, it's not LoDo (Which used to great with places like St Mark's and Josh and John's instead of terrible top 40 clubs) it's the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (Dioramas!), Lakeside being free on Labor Day, Free days at The Art Museum, The bubble room at The Children's Museum, The Highline Canal and Harvard Gulch trails, Kids eating free at countless restaurants around town (Baeu Joe's being one of the best), A million public parks, The Dragon Boat festival, Heritage Square, the Renaissance Festival, Pride Fest, The Taste of Colorado, Cherry Creek Mall, The Ogden theatre, Cervantes, The Bluebird, Crown Burgers, Chubby's, Santiago's, Benny Blanco's Pizza and so many more amazing places and things to do to make those memories with your families and friends that will have your children reminiscing about this great city when they're older. Here's Bree's original article: http://blogs.westword.com/showandtell/2014/08/a_love_letter_to_denver_the_city_i_used_to_know.php

kat0102
kat0102

Lauren Monitz you seem lost in a giant world put on your big girl shoes don't relate Chi to Denver ever again are you crazy. You just pissed off who your fighting for and now who you mingle with in this letter.Thank you for verifying that there are so many leaches in Denver.


Don't ever pitch this idea to someone who is from Colorado:


"It's a blessing in disguise that Denver has so much space to expand -- to grow outward instead of upwards. The sky's the limit in terms of potential."





Ellian
Ellian

Wow this article is annoying. Bree was writing about what it used to be. For some reason Lauren monitz took great offense? you weren't here during the tine she was talking about. So how can you talk about how much better Denver is if you have only been here a year? You have no comparison on what it used to be. And for the record Denver was WAY better 5 plus years ago.

Gerard_Portmanteau
Gerard_Portmanteau

Massive lulz at the "it's not the city it used to be 5/10/15 years ago!" Well, no shit. It's also not the city it was 20, 30, 40 years ago. Hold fast to memory, cherish the good stuff, but don't privilege the brief window you (we) all have. 


The Denver of my youth might be gone; long live the Denver of my adulthood, and hopefully, dotage.


Also, it's OK if you move here from elsewhere, just don't act like a dick.

Darrell Gordon
Darrell Gordon

They'll just light up the bong and won't even know its freezing outside. Glad I left.

Sanaya Tanksalvala
Sanaya Tanksalvala

This isn't really an informed response to the article it's responding to. The original piece was an ode to a city and state identity which is rapidly fading, if not already gone. It's not an attempt to push people away or stop the change, but people who grow up in a place before it changes will inevitably have a certain nostalgia for it, and Colorado has changed. It's GOOD to have articles reminiscing about places like Baby Doe's, and the response "I chose to be here, unlike you, it's pretty, we brought you most of the cultural good you have, and I don't actually know any Denver natives anyway..." doesn't really fit. Think about your own hometown and the things only people from your hometown will understand. Every place has them - I know, I've lived all over the world - and while it is inevitable that many will be lost, it's a GOOD thing to remember those things. Without those memories (and ideally some attempt to keep some of those places going), places would be cookie cutter clones of each other distinguished only by landscape and a few architectural landmarks. I'm sure you don't want that, so the next time a native tells you the rapidly fading place Denver used to be, maybe respond by asking "oh so what was that, then?" That's what I did when I lived other places and in my experience, it's rewarding for both parties.

Erich Kreybig
Erich Kreybig

Currently working for the government in Curaçao but moved to Colorado Springs 2 years ago. Miss it every day until we move back permanently.

Bryan Clark
Bryan Clark

lived here in the 90s then moved back a year ago because I missed it so much, I love Denver more than ever

Sam Christensen
Sam Christensen

Love Colorado it is the best. Good article also \U0001f600\U0001f60a

Margaux Milchen
Margaux Milchen

I'm from Boston..it would be perfect here..if we had an ocean.

Christopher Johnston
Christopher Johnston

If you were born here, you didn't choose it. If your an immigrant, you have seen the rest of the world and see this as perfection (Celebrate the 3 year mark on my 2 day trip to Colorado this month). I haven't left once. I'm not a native, but I'm home.

David Judd
David Judd

Denver is a great city because of the completely unique point of view and attitude of the people that built it and live here... dillholes from out of state come in and ruin our vibes

YupsterScum
YupsterScum

"When I moved here a year ago, no one even knew what RiNo was." - and the award for self-important, smugnorant quote of the year goes to...

Bob.Lawblah
Bob.Lawblah

I am a native if this amazing state we are fortune to call home, and as a result of having grown up in Denver, I've witnessed many changes over the years - some good, some bad.

As an adult, I have lived in several cities throughout the country and I agree, Denver is a truly incredible city to live in - the best.

The narcissistic self importance spewing out of your letter is repulsive. Denver was an amazing place before your decision to leave behind the blight of the center of the country for greener pastures. That, my friend, is why you chose to move here. To think there was an empty canvas upon which you could create a masterpiece is pathetic.

Denver's vibrancy is courtesy of generations of Colorado natives - individuals and communities that personify the spirit of the west - a spirit that so many newcomers to our state try so desperately to emulate but fail, in so many ways. Your letter is a pristine example of this failure.

Moving here, purchasing a new Subaru, and filling the backseat with mountaineering gear, doesn't bring you any closer to an understanding of what it means to be a Coloradoan.

I welcome newcomers to this state, but i hope (for the sake of us all) the balance do not share your elevated sense of self importance. I look forward to your contributions to the community and hope you remove that stick from your ass to give you the freedom to do so.

Remember, Colorado residents told the Olympics to piss off, partly, to keep this paradise a relative secret. Please tread a little lighter.

Joe Brooks
Joe Brooks

No I don't think natives are assholes at all. I have friends who are natives. I just think a select group of them feel entitled and act smug for having been born here

Jonah Menzies
Jonah Menzies

You think Denver natives are assholes? Try spending even a few days in Tex-ASS.

Jimmy Hersh
Jimmy Hersh

So now you have jr high kids writing for you? This shit is unreadable!! Wtf?!?!

YouPeopleAreBoring
YouPeopleAreBoring

Also, I don't know exactly where you get off thinking that Denver has become a great city because people from big cities took pity on us and came out here with their money and dreams to improve it. The credit should go to those who stayed here and those who moved here when Denver was a joke of a town. Those people opened clubs, restaurants, and stores in areas that were terrible (Baker, city park, uptown, five points, river north). Those people frequented those businesses and those people moved into those neighborhoods. Those people created the city that you wanted to move to. Now that you are here, try not to break your arm patting yourself on the back while taking credit for the work of others.

spiralspiral
spiralspiral

I'm not generally as resentful of all of the new blood as my native compatriots, and I recognize many of the benefits of many of the changes in Denver.

That said, Denver is considerably more expensive than it used to be, or ought to be (and I have perspective, having lived in Manhattan for several years), but in this case I blame the carpetbagging real estate developers and house flippers who took away most of the apartment housing in central Denver to be made into condos.


Most of what you said I take no issue with--sometimes a fresh positive, can-do element is what is called for, and the Denver of old was pretty darned cynical.  I truly don't miss that.


One thing you wrote really pissed me off though:


"It's a blessing in disguise that Denver has so much space to expand -- to grow outward instead of upwards."


If all of you want to move here to enjoy the natural beauty of the place, we should in fact be growing upwards, not outwards.  Why the hell do you want to pave over our beautiful state if you claim to love it so much?

RustyShackleford
RustyShackleford

I'm not from here, but I am so proud of this city and wish Chicago would take a cue. Denver is what all big cities should strive to emulate.

A better class of individual would focus instead on fixing where they came from. Instead they come here, and more often than not bring the same problems with them.


Pro tip: Detroit, Cleveland, etc. have room, inexpensive housing and more importantly water. Consider moving there instead.

Minna Horn
Minna Horn

Lol. Patricia Amori. The part about not being able to find natives!? Seriously? Just about everyone of my FB friends is a native. Not all, but most. The gang violence is happening, not as bad as Chicago, and we don't always hear about the dead guy found in his car from a carjacking in Stapleton.

padmathornlyre
padmathornlyre

I wish I knew you, Lauren. I wish we could walk together in Roxborough Park, and talk about nothing serious. Walking the South Rim, or on the floor of Fountain Valley, in a state where friendly things are legal.

RustyShackleford
RustyShackleford

Sorry But I find this article insulting. It also confirms what I've always believed, which is many of the people of "new denver" have nothing much to offer other than congestion, high rent prices and naivete.


On the contrary - They've done a bang-up job of turning Denver into an inland version of San Francisco - a playground for trust-funders and rich techies.

RustyShackleford
RustyShackleford

@mondogarage But LoDo is Wrigleyville, and aside from LoDo being a nice place to keep plastics containerized in their sanitized Tilted Kilt's and Jackson's sports bars, it's otherwise best left alone.

A smarter Colorado would recognize Wrigleyville as an invasive species, every bit as pernicious as Kentucky Bluegrass.

RustyShackleford
RustyShackleford

@kat0102 I find it depressing that we're still pushing for growth in this state when lack of water, coupled with rapidly-accelerating Climate Breakdown (hat tip to George Monbiot), is ultimately going to force a few million Coloradans to relocate elsewhere.

Stanley1
Stanley1

"Urban inequality"....PC-douche speak for "inner city cesspool of minority on minority violence and failed leftist policies". See also: Detroit.

Stanley1
Stanley1

"Urban inequality"....is this PC-douche speak for "inner city cesspool of minority on minority violence and failed leftist policies? See also: Detroit.

spiralspiral
spiralspiral

@joshdavidoff8 Hey now... the Merc and El Chapultepec are still around... don't call 'em dead before they're dead...


Muddy's though...  Ah, Muddy's I do miss you...

spiralspiral
spiralspiral

@RustyShackleford

Well, yes, there's space... I just question why it needs to be "developed".  As if McMansions, condo buildings, and pre-fab houses were somehow an improvement over that "undeveloped" space.


Your point about water is well taken.  That's a problem throughout the west, and yes, will only be worse in the future with our exploding population.

joshdavidoff8
joshdavidoff8

@spiralspiral yeah, that's just poor writing by me. I mean to say that we have lost places like those in the past and we are worried about losing places like the Merc or El Chapultepec in the future. We don't want those places to go the way of Muddy's.

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