Review: David Menard Fills Point Gallery With Dark and Poetic Evocations of Cities

Categories: Art review

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"To Have and To Have Not," by David Menard.

Urban Grotesque
Point Gallery
765 Santa Fe Drive

The current solo at Point Gallery features work by David Menard done over the past few years. Though Menard uses photography -- both his own and appropriated photos -- he was trained in drawing and works digitally, having never used a darkroom.

See also: Review: Mixing Painting and Sculpture Is a Winning Formula for Havu and Walker Galleries


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Review: Mixing Painting and Sculpture Is a Winning Formula for Havu and Walker Galleries

Categories: Art review

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Walker Fine Art

Bob Knox and Michael Clapper
William Havu Gallery
1040 Cherokee Street

Don Quade & Brandon Reese
Walker Fine Art
300 West 11th Avenue

Considering the nature of physics as it relates to rooms, it's easy to understand why gallery directors like to pair a painter, whose works can cover the walls, with a sculptor, whose pieces cover the floors. It's like having two places in one, and it clearly works, creating a clever solution to the problem of expensive retail space. The William Havu Gallery and Walker Fine Art, which are less than a block apart in the Golden Triangle neighborhood, frequently take this approach.

Havu is currently presenting simultaneous solos on the gallery's main level, Bob Knox: Real Abstract, which is made up of paintings, and Michael Clapper: Portals, which comprises sculptures. Knox is a New York artist, while Clapper lives and works in Denver.

See also: Review: Hong Seon Jang Goes Over the Moon -- and Under the Desk -- at David B. Smith


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Review: Hong Seon Jang Goes Over the Moon -- and Under the Desk -- at David B. Smith

Categories: Art review

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David B. Smith Gallery
Hong Seon Jang, "Minerals"

There are only a few days left before the end of the official run of Hong Seon Jang: waxed/waned at David B. Smith Gallery. I say "official" because the show will be on view through the end of December by appointment.

Born in Korea, where he earned his BFA at Dan Kook University, Jang moved to New York to work on his MFA at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He now lives in New York City. A conceptualist, Jang has written that he is interested in "the comparison of human activity and natural phenomena [and] the circulation of destruction and creation." That's pretty open-ended, and it provides only the slightest of insights regarding what waxed/waned is all about.

See also: Review: Discovering and Interpreting the West Takes a Fresh Look at the Landscape


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Connect the Blobs in Drips, Drops, Pours and Spins at Michael Warren Contemporary

Categories: Art review

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"Song of the Flying Scorpion," by Quintin Gonzalez, mixed-media on panel.

Mike McClung, the director of Michael Warren Contemporary, curated Drips, Drops, Pours and Spins, a show featuring four abstract artists who all use the liquid and viscous quality of pigments to create non-objective compositions, the subjects of which are the pigments themselves.

See also: Review: Discovering and Interpreting the West Takes a Fresh Look at the Landscape


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Review: Discovering and Interpreting the West Takes a Fresh Look at the Landscape

Categories: Art review

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Arvada Center
"Garden of the Gods," Jason Thielke

Discovering and Interpreting the West
The Arvada Center
6901 Wadsworth Boulevard

It was the scenic Rocky Mountains that first attracted artists to Colorado 150 years ago, and paintings and photos of the landscape are the works that laid the foundation for the rapidly developing art scene we have here now.

This kind of art continues to play a key role for many contemporary artists around here, and it was with that in mind that Kristin Bueb, the Arvada Center's exhibition coordinator and registrar, organized the three-part landscape extravaganza Discovering and Interpreting the West: 19th, 20th and 21st Century Landscapes.

See also: Review: Dmitri Obergfell Collapses the Old Into the New at Gildar Gallery

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Review: Dmitri Obergfell Collapses the Old Into the New at Gildar Gallery

Categories: Art review

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Gildar Gallery
Dmitri Obergfell, "Apotheosis," mixed materials.
Yinfinity: New Works by Dmitri Obergfell
Gildar Gallery
82 South Broadway

The Gildar Gallery is a modest, nearly anonymous South Broadway storefront with minimal exhibition space, but to his credit, director Adam Gildar continues to present a schedule of thoughtful shows, even if some of them aren't entirely successful. That's hardly what I'd say about the current offering, though, because it works in spades. Yinfinity: New Works by Dmitri Obergfell positively vibrates with aesthetic and conceptual energy -- just like Obergfell himself.

See also: Chuck Parson Builds Momentum With a Huge Show at Z Art Department

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Review: Chuck Parson Builds Momentum With a Huge Show at Z Art Department

Categories: Art review

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A group of small Parson sculptures.

Chuck Parson: Still and Centered Point
Z Art Department
1136 Speer Boulevard

Chuck Parson, who helped pioneer the conceptual abstraction movement around here forty years ago, is the subject of a major outing at Z Art Department called Still and Centered Point. The exhibit includes more than sixty installations, sculptures and drawings, most of which feature three-dimensional elements.

See also: Our Vulnerable Western Landscape Stars in Two Solo Shows at Robischon


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Review: Our Vulnerable Western Landscape Stars in Two Solo Shows at Robischon

Categories: Art review


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Robischon Gallery
"In Every Dry Gully, an Ache Lingers," by Kevin O'Connell, pigment print on aluminum.

Kevin O'Connell: Memories of Water
Lucas Foglia: Frontcountry
William Lamson: Automatic

Robischon Gallery
1740 Wazee Street

The varied and reliably dramatic vistas of the American West are the reason there's a category of work called Western art. The scenery, from mountains to plains, deserts to lakes, has a celebrity quality about it that has made our region internationally known.

And it's also the reason that artists started coming here more than 150 years ago and continue to do so today. This is the setup for two impressive solos at Robischon Gallery: Kevin O'Connell: Memories of Water and Lucas Foglia: Frontcountry. A third solo on display there, William Lamson: Automatic, isn't set around here but depicts a similar-looking landscape that's actually in South America.

See also: Review: Plus Strikes Gold With Its Final Show, Jenny Morgan: The Golden Hour


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Michael Brohman Gets Heavy at Pirate, While Walter Barton Takes a Lighter Approach

Categories: Art review

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"Borders" (detail), by Michael Brohman.
It isn't often that Michael Brohman's work could be described as somber ("outrageous" is more often what comes to mind), but that's the case with Horizons, now in the main space at Pirate.

See also: A Lively Mix of Sculptures, Paintings and Photos Fill Spark Gallery

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A Lively Mix of Sculptures, Paintings and Photos Fill Spark Gallery

Categories: Art review

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"Bags Grove," buy Andy Libertone.

Though the main gallery at Spark is usually cut into two spaces when there are two solos on display, Andy Libertone: Seldom Seen has been installed together with Katharine McGuinness: New.

See also: Review: Plus Strikes Gold With Its Final Show, Jenny Morgan: The Golden Hour


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