Review: Chuck Parson Builds Momentum With a Huge Show at Z Art Department

Categories: Art review

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A group of small Parson sculptures.

Chuck Parson: Still and Centered Point
Z Art Department
1136 Speer Boulevard

Chuck Parson, who helped pioneer the conceptual abstraction movement around here forty years ago, is the subject of a major outing at Z Art Department called Still and Centered Point. The exhibit includes more than sixty installations, sculptures and drawings, most of which feature three-dimensional elements.

See also: Our Vulnerable Western Landscape Stars in Two Solo Shows at Robischon


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Review: Our Vulnerable Western Landscape Stars in Two Solo Shows at Robischon

Categories: Art review


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Robischon Gallery
"In Every Dry Gully, an Ache Lingers," by Kevin O'Connell, pigment print on aluminum.

Kevin O'Connell: Memories of Water
Lucas Foglia: Frontcountry
William Lamson: Automatic

Robischon Gallery
1740 Wazee Street

The varied and reliably dramatic vistas of the American West are the reason there's a category of work called Western art. The scenery, from mountains to plains, deserts to lakes, has a celebrity quality about it that has made our region internationally known.

And it's also the reason that artists started coming here more than 150 years ago and continue to do so today. This is the setup for two impressive solos at Robischon Gallery: Kevin O'Connell: Memories of Water and Lucas Foglia: Frontcountry. A third solo on display there, William Lamson: Automatic, isn't set around here but depicts a similar-looking landscape that's actually in South America.

See also: Review: Plus Strikes Gold With Its Final Show, Jenny Morgan: The Golden Hour


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Michael Brohman Gets Heavy at Pirate, While Walter Barton Takes a Lighter Approach

Categories: Art review

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"Borders" (detail), by Michael Brohman.
It isn't often that Michael Brohman's work could be described as somber ("outrageous" is more often what comes to mind), but that's the case with Horizons, now in the main space at Pirate.

See also: A Lively Mix of Sculptures, Paintings and Photos Fill Spark Gallery

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A Lively Mix of Sculptures, Paintings and Photos Fill Spark Gallery

Categories: Art review

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"Bags Grove," buy Andy Libertone.

Though the main gallery at Spark is usually cut into two spaces when there are two solos on display, Andy Libertone: Seldom Seen has been installed together with Katharine McGuinness: New.

See also: Review: Plus Strikes Gold With Its Final Show, Jenny Morgan: The Golden Hour


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Review: Plus Strikes Gold With Its Final Show, Jenny Morgan: The Golden Hour

Categories: Art review

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Plus Gallery
Portion of "Venus in Furs" by Jenny Morgan (see full version below).
Jenny Morgan: The Golden Hour
Plus Gallery
2501 Larimer Street

Quickly heading to its closing date this coming Saturday, October 18, is Jenny Morgan: The Golden Hour at Plus Gallery, a small but compelling solo dedicated to this onetime Denver artist who now lives in New York. Morgan is notable because she is interested in doing something new with figuration, and the resulting work is part of the conceptual-realist movement in painting that's been going strong since the 1990s.

See also: Painter Jenny Morgan Talks About the Process Behind Her Nude Self-Portraits

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Review: A Trio of Abstract Exhibits Show the Power of Natural Selection

Categories: Art review

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William Havu Gallery
Nancy Lovendahl, "Quadrants 1 - 40."
Last month, in writing about the now-closed Harmony Hammond show at RedLine, as well as a group show featuring a trio of artists at Michael Warren Contemporary, I noted not only that painting appears to be back as strong as ever, but also that abstract painting in particular is coming on especially strong. In fact, abstraction in all mediums is suddenly seemingly everywhere, nationally and internationally.

This context provides the backdrop for two interconnected solos at the William Havu Gallery that, taken together, make up one of the great presentations on view right now. I'm talking about Homare Ikeda: Revisit, featuring a tremendous selection of the artist's idiosyncratic abstract paintings, and Nancy Lovendahl: Intercessions, which showcases an array of compelling, nature-based abstract sculptures.

See also: The Harmony Hammond Refutes Abstraction as Patriarchal


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Review: Two Distinct Takes on Conceptualism Fill the David B. Smith Gallery

Categories: Art review

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A portion of "Delphinius." Larger photo on next page.

David B. Smith has shoe-horned a pairing of shows into the gallery's early fall schedule this year, but that means the exhibits won't last long: both close Saturday. Gallery owner, David Smith, has brought on a new director, Whitney Carter, who recently moved here from California where she had extensive gallery experience.

For the show Ternion -- a word that expresses the idea of the work of three -- Carter tapped two artists she'd worked with in Los Angeles, David McDonald and April Street, while Smith brought in well-known Denver artist Bruce Price. All three artists do a type of conceptual abstraction, and their work interacts wonderfully together.

See also: Ray Tomasso and Regina Benson Create Art With Natural Force


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Review: Ray Tomasso and Regina Benson Create Art With Natural Force

Categories: Art review

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"Storm Track" by Ray Tomasso.

Artists Ray Tomasso and Regina Benson have been presenting tandem solo shows at Ice Cube for the last few years. This bond didn't develop because the two do similar work, but because they have certain affinities. First, there are the shared themes -- the natural forces in Colorado. Second, each is working in a medium outside the mainstream: Tomasso employs cast paper, while Benson uses dyed and pressed fabric.

See also: Review: Where You Begin at Pirate Is Full of Familiar Topics Leading to Strange Creations


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Review: Where You Begin at Pirate Is Full of Familiar Topics Leading to Strange Creations

Categories: Art review

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"Several Once White Towells," by Christine Buchsbaum.

Pirate member Christine Buchsbaum invited her friend and fellow artist, Michael Bhichitkul, to help her curate Where You Begin, a group show in which artists employ ordinary subjects in unusual or extraordinary ways. Both Buchsbaum and Bhichitkul included examples of their own works, and both are genuine standouts.

Buchsbaum's is a photo of a pair of women's legs standing in an ice-filled bathtub being used to chill fish. Bhichitkul created an image of a chunk of wood, then used an ax to chop into it and, as a consequence, the wall behind it.

See also: Imaginative Artists Find New Ways to Deal With the Western Landscape Tradition


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Review: The Harmony Hammond Show at RedLine Refutes Abstraction as Patriarchal

Categories: Art review

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RedLine
"Suture," by Harmony Hammond.
A generation ago, in the latter third of the twentieth century, post-modernist deconstructionists were finished with abstraction. It was dead, they said, along with painting itself. But in the intervening decades, two things happened. First, this deconstructionist idea became entrenched in academia, and second, it was proven to be wrong beyond any shadow of a doubt in studios, galleries and museums.

I bring this up because of the way that the spectacular Harmony Hammond: Becoming/Unbecoming Monochrome (which is rapidly coming to a close) at RedLine makes the point. Hammond, who lives in New Mexico, has created a body of abstract paintings over the past five decades that are at least as relevant to current ideas about making art as the controversial Aspen Art Museum piece that featured tortoises with iPads strapped to their shells. Actually, they are more so, because unlike the tortoises, Hammond's paintings are both smart and tremendously beautiful.

See also: Imaginative Artists Find New Ways to Deal With the Western Landscape Tradition

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