Review: Crammed Full of Cartier "Ice," the DAM's Brilliant Is the Perfect Winter Show

Categories: Art Review

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Photo: Nick Welsh, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Tutti Frutti strap bracelet worn by Mrs. Cole Porter. Cartier Paris, 1929. Platinum, diamonds, sapphires, emeralds, rubies.

Brilliant
Denver Art Museum
100 West 14th Avenue Parkway

The Denver Art Museum has come up with the perfect winter show: Brilliant: Cartier in the 20th Century, which is crammed to the rafters with "ice" in the form of more diamonds than I could possibly count. Up front, I'm going to admit that I know very little about jewelry (I don't even wear a watch), but I do know a lot about the history of style as it revealed itself in Paris in the twentieth century, and I've got a good handle on the characteristics of fine craft, as well. So if a person like myself, who has little interest in or knowledge of gems and precious metals, found this show riveting -- against my own expectations -- that really says something about how well done it is. And about how good Cartier was during its heyday. The show is a visual marathon, with so many things included that it's downright exhausting. There are some 200 artifacts from the Cartier collection alone, which is maintained by the company, with an additional 55 pieces coming from an array of private collectors.

See also: Review: Memories of Home Get Hazy for Jill Hadley Hooper at Goodwin Fine Art

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Free Association Links Artists Ania Gola-Kumor, Sandra Kaplan and Barbara Groh

Categories: Art Review

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"Untitled 3," by Ania Gola-Kumor oil/canvas.

Blurred Lines
Sandra Phillips Gallery
420 West 12th Avenue

Blurred Lines. The Sandra Phillips Gallery is a cozy space, making it a challenge to put on a group show, especially one made up of artists who work in large formats. But that's exactly what's on tap there now with Blurred Lines, which brings together large abstract paintings by three separate artists -- Ania Gola-Kumor, Sandra Kaplan and Barbara Groh.

See also: Review: Memories of Home Get Hazy for Jill Hadley Hooper at Goodwin Fine Art


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Review: Memories of Home Get Hazy for Jill Hadley Hooper at Goodwin Fine Art

Categories: Art Review

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Goodwin Fine Art
Jill Hadley Hooper, "Nature Morte, 2"

Jill Hadley Hooper: Interiors
Goodwin Fine Art
1255 Delaware Street

Jill Hadley Hooper is nationally known for her illustrations, which have appeared in numerous publications, including the New York Times. Around here, though, she wears many hats, and may be better known as the co-founder, with Tracy Weil, of the River North Art District. She's also respected for her curatorial vision, as expressed at Ironton Studios and Gallery, where she's the director. Finally, as this show at Goodwin reveals, she's also an expert painter and a significant Denver artist.

See also: Review: Conceptual Art from Judy Chicago, Ann Hamilton and Jae Ko


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Review: Conceptual Art from Judy Chicago, Ann Hamilton and Jae Ko

Categories: Art Review

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RedLine
Judy Chicago, "Earth Birth"
Surveying Judy Chicago
RedLine
2350 Arapahoe Street

There are three solos on display now through the holidays that focus on internationally known conceptual artists. RedLine is hosting a retrospective dedicated to Judy Chicago, a pioneer in feminist art, while Robischon has given space to two artists, Ann Hamilton and Jae Ko, with a small compatible group show as the conclusion.

Surveying Judy Chicago: 1970-2014 is the closing act in a year-long program at RedLine dedicated to celebrating the accomplishments of women artists; the program was flawlessly facilitated by gallery director Louise Martorano, while this exhibit was put together by curator Simon Zalkind and exhibition designer Ben Griswold.

See also: Light in the Darkness Is the Key to Linda Graham's Vaporous Installation at Hinterland

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Light in the Darkness Is the Key to Linda Graham's Vaporous Installation at Hinterland

Categories: Art Review

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A view of Linda Graham's installation at Hinterland.

Linda Graham: Personal Perceptions
Hinterland Gallery
3254 Walnut Street

Linda Graham has a background in ceramics, which she exhibited way back in the 1980s, but in the past few years she's discovered digital art -- which really couldn't be more different.

See also: Review: Paul Gillis Conjures Up an Enigmatic World Set in Both the Past and the Future


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Review: Paul Gillis Conjures Up an Enigmatic World Set in Both the Past and the Future

Categories: Art Review

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"Do you Remember Me," by Paul Gillis, oil on canvas.

Paul Gillis: Otherwhere/Otherwhen
Rule Gallery
3254 Walnut Street

Colorado artist Paul Gillis, though incredibly prolific, has kept a low profile over the past several decades. It's been five years since his last Denver solo, at the Singer Gallery, and a full quarter-century since the one before that, at the Denver Art Museum. That history alone makes Paul Gillis: Otherwhere/Otherwhen, at Rule Gallery, something special.

See also: Review: David Menard Fills Point Gallery With Dark and Poetic Evocations of Cities


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Review: David Menard Fills Point Gallery With Dark and Poetic Evocations of Cities

Categories: Art Review

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"To Have and To Have Not," by David Menard.

Urban Grotesque
Point Gallery
765 Santa Fe Drive

The current solo at Point Gallery features work by David Menard done over the past few years. Though Menard uses photography -- both his own and appropriated photos -- he was trained in drawing and works digitally, having never used a darkroom.

See also: Review: Mixing Painting and Sculpture Is a Winning Formula for Havu and Walker Galleries


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Review: Mixing Painting and Sculpture Is a Winning Formula for Havu and Walker Galleries

Categories: Art Review

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Walker Fine Art

Bob Knox and Michael Clapper
William Havu Gallery
1040 Cherokee Street

Don Quade & Brandon Reese
Walker Fine Art
300 West 11th Avenue

Considering the nature of physics as it relates to rooms, it's easy to understand why gallery directors like to pair a painter, whose works can cover the walls, with a sculptor, whose pieces cover the floors. It's like having two places in one, and it clearly works, creating a clever solution to the problem of expensive retail space. The William Havu Gallery and Walker Fine Art, which are less than a block apart in the Golden Triangle neighborhood, frequently take this approach.

Havu is currently presenting simultaneous solos on the gallery's main level, Bob Knox: Real Abstract, which is made up of paintings, and Michael Clapper: Portals, which comprises sculptures. Knox is a New York artist, while Clapper lives and works in Denver.

See also: Review: Hong Seon Jang Goes Over the Moon -- and Under the Desk -- at David B. Smith


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Review: Hong Seon Jang Goes Over the Moon -- and Under the Desk -- at David B. Smith

Categories: Art Review

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David B. Smith Gallery
Hong Seon Jang, "Minerals"

There are only a few days left before the end of the official run of Hong Seon Jang: waxed/waned at David B. Smith Gallery. I say "official" because the show will be on view through the end of December by appointment.

Born in Korea, where he earned his BFA at Dan Kook University, Jang moved to New York to work on his MFA at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He now lives in New York City. A conceptualist, Jang has written that he is interested in "the comparison of human activity and natural phenomena [and] the circulation of destruction and creation." That's pretty open-ended, and it provides only the slightest of insights regarding what waxed/waned is all about.

See also: Review: Discovering and Interpreting the West Takes a Fresh Look at the Landscape


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Connect the Blobs in Drips, Drops, Pours and Spins at Michael Warren Contemporary

Categories: Art Review

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"Song of the Flying Scorpion," by Quintin Gonzalez, mixed-media on panel.

Mike McClung, the director of Michael Warren Contemporary, curated Drips, Drops, Pours and Spins, a show featuring four abstract artists who all use the liquid and viscous quality of pigments to create non-objective compositions, the subjects of which are the pigments themselves.

See also: Review: Discovering and Interpreting the West Takes a Fresh Look at the Landscape


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