Colorado Seeking Applications for the First-Ever Youth Poet Laureate for Denver

minor.disturbance.aug_.2013.copy.jpg
Photo by Daniel Sawyer Schaefer for Brave New Voices
Minor Disturbance has been supporting youth poets for years.
Denver may no longer have an adult poet laureate -- the position was eliminated a few years ago to save money -- but the state still does: his name is Joe Hutchison. But on Friday, Colorado Creative Industry -- the state's art agency announced that it is accepting applications for the first-ever Denver Youth Poet Laureate.

See also: Joe Hutchison, Colorado's New Poet Laureate, Tells the Story of Silas Soule

More »

Where the New York Times Would Go During 36 Hours in Denver

mayantheater.jpg
Westword
Mayan Theatre, a must-see in Denver.
What would you do if you had just 36 hours in this city? "The signs of Denver's economic high times as a pot boomtown and bastion of progressive urban policies are everywhere," says the New York Times in the just-published "What to Do in Denver." Although the Times doesn't mention any particular pot shops, it name-checks a number of arts venues that are smart recommendations for any visitor to the Mile High City -- and they should be regular steps for residents, too.

What does the Times suggest?

See also: Where the New York Times Would Eat During 36 Hours in Denver

More »

Four Charged With Theft of Dale Chihuly Art From Denver Botanic Gardens

chihulypermanent.jpg
Photo by Scott Dressel-Martin, Denver Botanic Gardens
Dale Chihuly's "Colorado" is now part of the permanent collection at the Denver Botanic Gardens.
The Denver Botanic Gardens has a permanent reminder of last year's blockbuster Chihuly exhibit: "Colorado," a piece by artist Dale Chihuly that was made possible through funds provided by donors Robert and Judi Newman and the Kemper family, and installed a few weeks ago. And now four more Coloradans have something to remember the show by: theft charges.

See also: The Denver Botanic Gardens Lands a Dale Chihuly Sculpture for Its Permanent Collection

More »

Devo's Mark Mothersbaugh Will Perform Thursday Courtesy of MCA Denver

Mark_Mothersbaugh.jpg
MCA Denver
Mark Mothersbaugh performs.

MCA Denver director Adam Lerner has promoted the idea that Mark Mothersbaugh -- co-founder of the '70s- and '80s-era New Wave group Devo -- is much more than simply a former rock star but is actually one of the major creative forces of our time.

Lerner lays out this powerful claim in a pretty convincing way in Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia, an over-the-top exhibit that fills all three floors at the MCA with a dizzying array of material ranging in date over the last forty-years.

See also: The Industrial Aesthetic of Father and Son Artists Collin and Chuck Parson


More »

Ten Best Commercial Signs on Central Colfax

PetesKitchenColfaxHorizontal.jpg
The Pete's Kitchen sign is a Colfax landmark.
The Colorado history contained in the 26 miles of Colfax Avenue, the longest main street in America, is thick with truth and tall tales. You can read some of this history in the commercial signs that still exist on Colfax; we've already profiled the best commercial signs on West Colfax and the best signs on East Colfax.

But it's the stretch between Colorado Boulevard and Broadway that is the most strange and storied, and so we've collected the best commercial signs that can be found along the busiest part of Colfax -- some old, some brand-new. Keep reading for an illuminating look at main street America. (Also, honorable mention to Trattoria Stella, Atomic Cowboy and Argonaut Liquors, for contributing more good signs to Colfax culture!)

See also: Keeping Colfax weird: Ten spots that give Denver's main street its culture and character

More »

Five Hip-Hop Pioneers Introduced to the World in Wild Style, Screening Monday

WildStyle1.jpg
Music Box Films
Charlie Ahearn's hip-hop documentary was never late to the party -- it was right on time.
There aren't many filmmakers who are in the right place at the right time to capture the start of a subculture; most documentary projects come together around an idea or movement when popularity is at a fever pitch -- but by the time the dust settles and the film comes out, the fever has cooled and we're left with an embarrassing relic of a moment in time. (See the two dueling Lambada movies in 1990 -- or better yet...don't).

Charlie Ahearn's 1983 triumphant Wild Style, playing Monday, January 19 at the Alamo Drafthouse, is one of those rare films that was ahead of the zeitgeist. It was instrumental in successfully documenting a new little movement called hip-hop and its fresh, multiple points of entry: graffiti art, break-dancing, fashion, turntable mastery and rap music. Ahearn had been approached by charming graffiti artist Fred Braithwaite, who essentially handed him the keys to the kingdom: Hang out with Fab Five Freddy and his friends who were starting an artistic revolution in the Bronx, turn the camera on -- and the film will practically make itself.

See also: The Ten Best Hip Hop DJs In Denver

More »

Art Car Creator Jamie Vaida Heads for the Telluride Fire Festival

ShackToHellYouRide.jpg
courtesy Jamie Vaida
Jamie Vaida and Alvin Sessions' "Shack to Hell You Ride" is plumbed with propane for the Telluride Fire Festival
When metal sculptor Jamie Vaida packed up and moved his Grand Junction studio to Oakland, California, a few years ago, he quickly found an audience for the architectural details he specializes in -- like some of the coolest spiral staircase handrails and hottest fireplace screens you've ever seen -- and also found patrons for some of his more fiery ideas.

"Straightaway, I got involved in the Burning Man scene after I moved to California, and started getting commissions for art cars," says Vaida, whose art car collaboration with Grand Junction artist Alvin Sessions will be featured in this week's Telluride Fire Festival.

See also: Telluride Fire Festival

More »

Another 100 Colorado Creatives: Aaron "Ukulele Loki" Johnson

Aaron_Loki_Johnson_CPR_Final.jpg
Colorado Public Radio
OpenAir weekend morning show host and man about Denver, Aaron "Ukulele Loki" Johnson.
#41: Aaron "Ukulele Loki" Johnson

Aaron Johnson, aka Ukulele Loki, blithely changes hats every day: A musician, emcee extraordinaire, activist, lapsed public-school teacher, Denver County Fair freak-show host and radio host for Colorado Public Radio's OpenAir (as well as a co-founder of Boulder's Radio 1190), Johnson moves and shakes to a different drummer, all the while twirling his waxed mustache. We asked Johnson to share what makes his wacky world spin; keep reading to learn more.

See also: Another 100 Colorado Creatives: Heather Dalton

More »

The Mayday Experiment: For a Tiny House, (Almost) Everything Must Go!

hordehoriz.jpg
Lauri Lynnxe Murphy
Stash of stuff -- all useful -- in the studio.
I have a confession to make. I'm a hoarder.

Not in the "as seen on TV" sense, thankfully -- though I suppose I've come close at times. I don't hang onto things out of sentimentality, but because everything is useful in my eyes. Everything.

See also: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Mayday Experiment

More »

DIA's Latest "Train Call" Messages Feature DeMarcus Ware, Lindsey Vonn

offlimits-01-demarcus.jpg

The Denver Broncos spent $30 million last spring to sign defensive end DeMarcus Ware, one of the best defensive players in the NFL, as a way to send a message to the rest of the league and to help the team get back to the Super Bowl in 2015.

Denver International Airport will only have to spend $1,500 to get Ware to send another message: "Welcome to Denver. This is DeMarcus Ware of your AFC West Division Champion Denver Broncos. It's playoff time, and we are all united in orange. Go, Broncos!"

See also: Here's Why Each New DIA Train Message Costs the City $1,500

More »

Now Trending

Loading...