Pop culture's top five demon hunters

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The Winchesters hunt demons and look dreamy, all at once.
Demons are bad news. They're powerful, usually immortal -- or damn close -- and almost invariably pure, undiluted evil. When you've got demon problems, you've got serious problems. And when that happens, who are you going to call? Not the Ghostbusters. Yeah, they did best a demon or two, but they almost leveled New York in the process. Too risky. No, you want someone who deals with demons as a matter of course, someone who can take them down without risking total annihilation via some shoddy backpack nuclear reactors. You need a demon hunter.

This Thursday, September 26, Littleton's Alamo Drafthouse is hosting a one-day showing of Blue Exorcist: The Movie, the big-screen followup to the popular anime series. The film depicts the work of two demon-hunting brothers -- one of them half-demon himself -- working to save their home from an invasion of demonic hordes, a mission we can all get behind (well, all of us except the demons, anyway). To get psyched up for the event, we've compiled this list of pop culture's five most badass demon hunters.

See also: The six best onscreen pairings of robots and the apocalypse

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69 badass cosplay characters from San Diego Comic-Con 2013

Categories: Comix

Rob Inderrieden
San Diego Comic-Con is a lot of things to a lot of people. You can bemoan the commercialization and curse the movie studios, but while you're doing that, be sure to appreciate the magic of thousands upon thousands of super-fans dressing up as their favorite characters for no other reason than because it's fantastically fun.

Where else are you going to see Marty McFly hanging out with the Joker, Thor, Tank Girl, Snow White, Chun-Li and Deadmau5 Spider-Man?

Here we present 69 (dudes!) of our favorite cosplayers...

See also:
- The best of Superman cosplay
- 100 Memorable cosplay images from 2012
- If I wanted cosplay with my drinks, I wouldn't go to the Cruise Room.


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Why Comic-Con is really about community

Categories: Comix

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Liz Ohanesian
When religious protesters showed up at Comic-Con, attendees responded with absurd signs.
Comic-Con packed in talent and fans alike in San Diego all weekend. Liz Ohanesian covered the action for L.A. Weekly, one of our partner papers; here's her fourth report.

In Southern California, you can be certain that the bigger the event, the more religious protesters you'll see across the street. Oftentimes, convention-goers will counter the protesters with signs bearing absurd slogans. That was the case in San Diego this year, when attendees dropped as many nerdy references as they could squeeze onto a piece of cardboard.

Usually I try to ignore the people with the fire-and-brimstone signs. If world history has taught us anything, it's that religious arguments don't end with a cordial handshake. On Sunday, though, I was stuck on a corner across from the San Diego Convention Center just a few feet away from a guy with a megaphone. He was going on about "darkness," which I humbly submit isn't a bad thing, but we can talk about that later. I started grumbling to myself. Some others in the crowd challenged him loudly. The guy with the megaphone turned to one and lashed out with some insults.

Then, in the back of this tightly packed crowd, a man started singing "Joy to the World," the Three Dog Night song that begins with "Jeremiah was a bullfrog." By the time he reached the chorus, the bulk of the convention-goers had joined him in song.

See also:
- Emily the Strange: From quirky T-shirt character to pop-culture icon
- Thrilling Adventure Hour at Comic-Con with Kickstarter-funded comic book
- Why Regular Show was so huge at Comic-Con this year

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Emily the Strange: From quirky T-shirt character to pop-culture icon

Categories: Comix

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Comic-Con has been packing in talent and fans alike in San Diego all weekend. Liz Ohanesian is covering the action for our media group; here's the third of her reports.
Twenty years ago, Emily the Strange first appeared on T-shirts and other odds and ends. Now, the thirteen-year-old girl with the long black hair, black dress and penchant for cats is the star of novels, comic books, iPhone apps and so much more.

Most recently, she's been fronting a band, Emily and the Strangers. Their adventures are documented in the comic-book series of the same name, published by Dark Horse Comics. But it's more than that. Emily and the Strangers are the band credited with a new single, "Calling All Guitars," and a video.

See also:
- Thrilling Adventure Hour at Comic-Con with Kickstarter-funded comic book
- Why Regular Show was so huge at Comic-Con this year
- Everything I know about patriotism I learned from Captain America

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Thrilling Adventure Hour at Comic-Con with Kickstarter-funded comic book

Categories: Comix

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Courtesy of Archaia
Comic-Con has been packing in talent and fans alike in San Diego all weekend. Liz Ohanesian is covering the action for our media group; here's the second of her reports.

Ben Blacker had just arrived at San Diego Comic-Con when we met. The writer was preparing for a whirlwind of events surrounding Thrilling Adventure Hour, the live show he created with Ben Acker eight years ago. There was a signing, an official Comic-Con panel and four sold-out evening performances of the stage show that's captivated live audiences in Los Angeles and Nerdist podcast listeners worldwide.

See also:
- Thrilling Adventure Hour at Comic-Con with Kickstarter-funded comic book
- Emily the Strange: From quirky T-shirt character to pop-culture icon
- Everything I know about patriotism I learned from Captain America


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Why Regular Show was so huge at Comic-Con this year

Categories: Comix

Liz Ohanesian
J.G. Quintel, creator of Regular Show, left, meets Muscle Man come to life.
Comic-Con has been packing in talent and fans alike in San Diego all weekend. Liz Ohanesian is covering the action for our media group; here's the first of her reports.

J.G. Quintel has been going to San Diego Comic-Con for a decade now. He started out his journey here as a fan, a CalArts student who caught wind of the event from his brother. Quintel would register to attend the convention after he arrived at the venue. He would walk into panels at Hall H, now the home of blockbuster convention talks and long lines. He did this anonymously. Ten years ago, people didn't recognize Quintel.

Just as San Diego Comic-Con has grown in popularity over the past few years, so has Quintel. He created an animated series for Cartoon Network called Regular Show. It's about a bluejay named Mordecai, a raccoon named Rigby and their eclectic group of friends. Over the course of four seasons, it's become a commercial and critical success. Regular Show already has an Emmy to its name and was just nominated for two more. People cosplay characters from the show at conventions and swap all sorts of Regular Show references online.

See also:
- Thrilling Adventure Hour at Comic-Con with Kickstarter-funded comic book
- Why Regular Show was so huge at Comic-Con this year
- Everything I know about patriotism I learned from Captain America


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Everything I know about patriotism I learned from Captain America

Categories: Comix, Geek Speak

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America, fuck yeah!
Captain America made me the patriot I am today.

I'm sure there were some other influences. Probably a little Red Dawn, a splash of GI Joe and perhaps even some stuff that didn't come from comic books, movies or after-school cartoons. But it was Captain America, specifically a two-year story arc that started in 1987 at the height of my comics-collecting career, that crystallized my understanding of what it means to be a patriot in the world we live in.

See also:
- Mystery Science Theater 3000's legacy of hilarity
- Zombies, motherhood and Tesla: Alexandre O. Philippe launches Fried Comics
- Denver Comic Con founder Charlie La Greca on what makes this con special


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Westword Book Club: Comedian Deacon Gray on comedy, comic books, and the Theory of Stew

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Jeff Nicholson
Reading is about more than following a narrative or absorbing information; it can also be a profound shared experience that culminates in a better understanding of ourselves and each other. In that spirit, welcome to the Westword Book Club, which celebrates the books that inspire Denver artists.

Deacon Gray, an Oklahoman transplant who honed his comedic expertise through years of working thankless road-dog gigs, is the new-talent coordinator in Denver's most celebrated comedy club. As such, he slaloms between developing his own act and mentoring insecure young comics who seek to benefit from his 25 years in the game.

See also:
- Westword Book Club: Comedian Adrian Mesa on searching for spirituality in literature
- Deacon Gray thinks Denver could use a more monthly alternative comedy shows
- A guide to DIY comedy tours with the Fine Gentleman's Club


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Zombies, motherhood and Tesla: Filmmaker Alexandre O. Philippe launches Fried Comics

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Clay Adams (left) and Alexandre O. Philippe want you to get Fried.
Local filmmaker Alexandre O. Philippe has a passion for pop culture. His work has tackled pop cultural phenomena as big as Star Wars and as small as the strange case of the octopus that correctly predicted Germany's World Cup games a few years back. He's also hard at work on Doc of the Dead, an in-depth look at zombie culture. (Disclosure: I am slated to appear in Doc of the Dead in my capacity as a zombie expert; I receive no compensation for this beyond the joy of sharing my love of zombies.)

Now, in addition to his film work, Philippe has launched Fried Comics, a web-based comics imprint, with longtime friend and writer/actor Clay Adams. Fried's website just went live yesterday with the first pages of Pregnant Bitches of War, an alternate history that has Nikola Tesla mentoring a group of expectant mothers as they try to fix the horrible future that results when they accidentally kill a young Adolf Hitler, and Deadskins, a zombie apocalypse Western featuring a Harvard dandy and his blind, drunk sidekick. We caught up with Adams and Philippe in the middle of this maelstrom of work to learn about Fried, get a progress report on Doc of the Dead, and find out what it is about pop culture that gets Phillipe so excited.

See also:
- Local filmmakers tackle zombie culture with Doc of the Dead
- Paul the Octopus film next for The People vs. George Lucas makers
- Event: TEDx Mile High

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Video: Meet the people of Denver Comic Con

Categories: Comix, Events

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Danielle Lirette
We met this guy at Denver Comic Con 2013 -- and many others.
Denver Comic Con took over the streets of Denver near the Colorado Convention Center last weekend during three days of celebrities, events, panels and displays. We're still reeling from it all -- and you might be too. While you plan the early stages of next year's costume, check out our video recap of Denver Comic Con 2013.

See also:
- Winners of our first annual Comic issue contest
- Costumes of Comic Con 2013
- Doctor Who fans of Comic Con


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