Code Black director on creating a narrative amidst chaos

Categories: Film and TV

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Dr. Ryan McGarry, director of Code Black.
Code Black -- which opens Friday, August 1, at the Sie FilmCenter -- reminds viewers of an astonishing reality of the health-care industry: In emergencies, seconds count. The documentary follows Ryan McGarry, a physician who trained in the trauma bay at Los Angeles County Hospital and brought cameras along for the journey, so you can see exactly what it's like to be a twenty-something suddenly responsible for a human life. Many human lives, in fact.

In advance of the Denver run, we talked to McGarry about the process of making Code Black, some of the biggest issues in health care and more.

See also: On eight years of sobriety: the wonderful and terrifying reality of an alcohol-free life

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Ten best Denver movie theaters for catching a summer blockbuster

Categories: Film and TV

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Too hot to hike? Escaping into a movie theater to glut on popcorn and blockbuster films is one of the tried and true ways to beat the blazing summer sun. Sure, these $200 million Hollywood titans sometimes crash -- but even if they let you down, you can bank on the pleasure of visiting Denver's hottest -- rather, coolest theaters.

What makes them so good? Most have big enough screens, buckets of popcorn and overpriced soda, but the theaters on this list offer something more. Some are cheap; some serve up gourmet meals; others allow viewers to wallow in nostalgia; many are the biggest of the big. Now, turn off your cell phones and relax for our list.

See also: The ten best movie events in Denver in July

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Adam Sank on Last Comic Standing and performing at nudist retreats

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Michael Martin

This show has been postponed until September 24: Adam Sank is a nationally renowned comedian who has appeared on Last Comic Standing and VH1's Best Week Ever. In June, he debuted his one-man cabaret show Mama, I Want to Sing Showtunes: A One 'Mo Show to sell-out crowds. Sank is coming to the Denver Improv on Wednesday, July 30 in September. Westword caught up with Sank to talk about everything from transcending an audience's labels to performing at nudist retreats.

See also: Aparna Nancherla on Totally Biased, Australian crowds and avoiding the dregs of Twitter

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Tom Miller's Limited Partnership chronicles a forty-year same-sex marriage sealed in Colorado

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Courtesy of Tom Miller
Tom Miller's documentary Limited Partnership follows the forty-year marriage of Richard Adams and Tony Sullivan.
Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall continues to defy legal threats and issue same-sex marriage licenses -- just as Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Clela Rorex did four decades ago. In his documentary Limited Partnership, the closing night film at this year's Cinema Q film festival, filmmaker Tom Miller follows the forty-year relationship of a couple Rorex married. Using a wealth of archival footage, the film shows how the ban on same-sex marriage and immigration law have impacted the lives of Filipino-American Richard Adams and Australian immigrant Tony Sullivan. In advance of the July 27 program, Westword spoke with Miller about his movie, the equal rights marriage debate and the couple's fight to have their marriage license honored by immigration services.


See also: Top ten queer films -- a countdown in honor of Cinema Q


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Podcast: Karina Longworth on Old Hollywood

Categories: Film and TV

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On this week's Voice Film Club podcast, Amy Nicholson of the L.A. Weekly and Stephanie Zacharek of The Village Voice interview film critic and author Karina Longworth, who's just launched a fascinating new podcast on the history of Hollywood called You Must Remember This.

Cinema Q opens tonight with Appropriate Behavior: Can vacuous hipsters fill the void?

Categories: Film and TV

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Appropriate Behavior
Appropriate Behavior is Cinema Q's opening night film.
With the booming Denver housing market and the influx of hipsters struggling to find meaning in a culture built on a bedrock of irony and flippant fashion, visiting Brooklyn -- ground zero for vacuous aesthetes -- is like looking into a crystal ball and seeing the future Queen City of the Plains. Cinema Q, Denver Film Society's annual LGBT film festival, opens tonight with Appropriate Behavior -- a movie that seems ambivalent about whether it wants to embrace or satirize New York's affluent hipsters.

See also: Top ten queer films -- a countdown in honor of Cinema Q

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Top ten queer films -- a countdown in honor of Cinema Q

Categories: Film and TV

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Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender cinema is becoming the new norm, according to Denver Film Society programmer Matthew Campbell: Festivals such as Sundance now feature films about LGBT characters who are fully fleshed out and whose stories have less to do with their sexual identity, he points out. Marriage and participation in dominant culture are the themes of the day and the Denver Film Society's annual LGBT festival, Cinema Q, reflects that, Campbell says.

See also: Johnny Minotaur restored: Queer cinema, censorship and Denver Film Society's bravery

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Celebrate the save of the Mayan Theatre at a free program Friday

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With Broadway now the center of the hipster universe, it's hard to remember that time thirty years ago when Denver's once gleaming "Miracle Mile" -- a stretch of streamlined stores and car dealerships -- had devolved into a malevolent mile of boarded-up storefronts, decrepit hotels and vacant lots. The area was so bad that the Mayan Theatre, an art-deco masterpiece that was one of Denver's premier movie palaces when it opened in 1930, was in danger of demolition.

And then the Friends of the Mayan stepped in.

See also: Photos of the Landmark Mayan Theatre's eightieth birthday party


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Aparna Nancherla on Totally Biased, Australian crowds and avoiding the dregs of Twitter

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Doug Ault
The High Plains Comedy Festival will return next month, and SexPot comedy will whet fans' appetites tonight with another weed-and-jokes pizza party at the Oriental Theater. The lineup is packed with crushers from start to finish: SexPot host Jordan Doll and comics Sean Patton, Ashley Barnhill and Ian Douglas Terry will join headliner Aparna Nancherla for an evening that promises to be a greasy slice of laughter pie. Nancherla is a fast-rising star on the alternative comedy scene whose absurdist perspective informs a wide-ranging act that can touch on everything from the gross combo of orange juice and toothpaste to imperialism within the same five-minute set. Nancherla has appeared on Conan and @Midnight, and contributed several memorable segments as a performer and staff writer to the prematurely cancelled Totally Biased with Kamau Bell. In advance of tonight's show, Westword caught up with Nancherla to chat about about SexPot, Australian audiences and avoiding the dregs of Twitter.

See also: Marc Maron on patent trolls and spiritual experiences in the desert

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Podcast: The mystifying world of Planes with L.A. Weekly film critic Amy Nicholson

Categories: Film and TV

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On this week's Voice Film Club podcast, we hear from L.A. Weekly film critic Amy Nicholson, who's intrigued by the bizarre universe of Pixar's Planes movies. We also hear about the film critic's background and how she became interested in the movies by way of subliminal advertising and photography.

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