Podcast: Karina Longworth on Old Hollywood

Categories: Film and TV

karina_longworth_twitter.jpeg
On this week's Voice Film Club podcast, Amy Nicholson of the L.A. Weekly and Stephanie Zacharek of The Village Voice interview film critic and author Karina Longworth, who's just launched a fascinating new podcast on the history of Hollywood called You Must Remember This.

Cinema Q opens tonight with Appropriate Behavior: Can vacuous hipsters fill the void?

Categories: Film and TV

appropriatebehavior.jpg
Appropriate Behavior
Appropriate Behavior is Cinema Q's opening night film.
With the booming Denver housing market and the influx of hipsters struggling to find meaning in a culture built on a bedrock of irony and flippant fashion, visiting Brooklyn -- ground zero for vacuous aesthetes -- is like looking into a crystal ball and seeing the future Queen City of the Plains. Cinema Q, Denver Film Society's annual LGBT film festival, opens tonight with Appropriate Behavior -- a movie that seems ambivalent about whether it wants to embrace or satirize New York's affluent hipsters.

See also: Top ten queer films -- a countdown in honor of Cinema Q

More »

Top ten queer films -- a countdown in honor of Cinema Q

Categories: Film and TV

lookinglangstontitleweb.jpg
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender cinema is becoming the new norm, according to Denver Film Society programmer Matthew Campbell: Festivals such as Sundance now feature films about LGBT characters who are fully fleshed out and whose stories have less to do with their sexual identity, he points out. Marriage and participation in dominant culture are the themes of the day and the Denver Film Society's annual LGBT festival, Cinema Q, reflects that, Campbell says.

See also: Johnny Minotaur restored: Queer cinema, censorship and Denver Film Society's bravery

More »

Celebrate the save of the Mayan Theatre at a free program Friday

mayanoutside.jpg
With Broadway now the center of the hipster universe, it's hard to remember that time thirty years ago when Denver's once gleaming "Miracle Mile" -- a stretch of streamlined stores and car dealerships -- had devolved into a malevolent mile of boarded-up storefronts, decrepit hotels and vacant lots. The area was so bad that the Mayan Theatre, an art-deco masterpiece that was one of Denver's premier movie palaces when it opened in 1930, was in danger of demolition.

And then the Friends of the Mayan stepped in.

See also: Photos of the Landmark Mayan Theatre's eightieth birthday party


More »

Aparna Nancherla on Totally Biased, Australian crowds and avoiding the dregs of Twitter

aparnaNancherla.png
Doug Ault
The High Plains Comedy Festival will return next month, and SexPot comedy will whet fans' appetites tonight with another weed-and-jokes pizza party at the Oriental Theater. The lineup is packed with crushers from start to finish: SexPot host Jordan Doll and comics Sean Patton, Ashley Barnhill and Ian Douglas Terry will join headliner Aparna Nancherla for an evening that promises to be a greasy slice of laughter pie. Nancherla is a fast-rising star on the alternative comedy scene whose absurdist perspective informs a wide-ranging act that can touch on everything from the gross combo of orange juice and toothpaste to imperialism within the same five-minute set. Nancherla has appeared on Conan and @Midnight, and contributed several memorable segments as a performer and staff writer to the prematurely cancelled Totally Biased with Kamau Bell. In advance of tonight's show, Westword caught up with Nancherla to chat about about SexPot, Australian audiences and avoiding the dregs of Twitter.

See also: Marc Maron on patent trolls and spiritual experiences in the desert

More »

Podcast: The mystifying world of Planes with L.A. Weekly film critic Amy Nicholson

Categories: Film and TV

planes-fire-and-rescue.jpg
On this week's Voice Film Club podcast, we hear from L.A. Weekly film critic Amy Nicholson, who's intrigued by the bizarre universe of Pixar's Planes movies. We also hear about the film critic's background and how she became interested in the movies by way of subliminal advertising and photography.

More »

Marc Maron on patent trolls and spiritual experiences in the desert

marcmaronRobynVonswankIFC.jpg
Robyn Von Swank/ IFC
Most comedy nerds are already familiar with Marc Maron's biography. He rose to prominence in the alt-comedy scene of the '90s before floundering through a few TV and radio gigs that never felt like a perfect fit. Despite racking up over forty appearances on the various incarnations of Conan and never leaving the airwaves for long, Maron's career was at a low point when he started the WTF podcast in his garage. In addition to in-depth interviews with comedians, musicians and the occasional movie star, WTF gives plenty of mic time to Maron's chronic over-sharing as well. Though off-putting at first to some listeners, his rambling engenders a more personal connection with the legion of listeners who have flocked to his shows. Currently starring in the final few episodes of the second season his IFC sitcomMaron, he'll be headlining this weekend at the downtown Comedy Works . In advance of that run, we caught up with Maron to discuss patent trolls, Denver's drunk crowds and his attempts at a spiritual experience in the desert.

See also: Christopher Titus on happiness, joking about guns, and Pawnography

More »

Christopher Titus on happiness, joking about guns, and Pawnography

TitusHeadshot1213.jpg
Christopher Titus is a singular voice in standup comedy, with a unique style and profound personal connection to his fanbase. Titus stood out early on with appearances on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno and Premium Blend, and managed to turn his one-man show Norman Rockwell Is Bleeding into the eponymous sitcom Titus, which ran from 2000 t 2002 on Fox until it was cancelled following a dispute with executives. Titus remained prolific in the aftermath, releasing standup specials The Fifth Annual End of the World Tour, Love is Evol, Neverlution and The Voice in my Head in the space of a few years. He now co-hosts the Titus Podcast and is working to fund a movie called Special Unit, co-starring Denver's own Josh Blue, as well as gearing up for his next special, The Angry Pursuit of Happiness. Titus will headline at Comedy Works South this week; in advance of those shows, Westword caught up with him to discuss honesty in comedy, dismantling pro-gun hysteria with humor, and his new History Channel game show, Pawnography.

See also: Paul Reiser on his Sundance film and returning to standup after twenty years

More »

See Video Games: The Movie with Colorado's game development community Sunday

Categories: Film and TV, Games

VGtMovie.jpg
Video games have come a long way since Space Invaders and Pong. These days, games are both a multi-billion-dollar-a-year industry and a genuine cultural force, enjoyed by people of all ages across platforms ranging from dedicated gaming consoles to Facebook.

"The average age of a gamer is like 31 now. People all over the world play games competitively," says Jet Ternlund, a local game developer and board member of the Colorado branch of the International Game Developers Association. "The gaming industry has passed up movies -- it's billions of dollars in sales. Something like 56 percent of Americans play video games -- more than half. It's huge."

See also: Five games that changed my life -- from Halo to Sorry!

More »

Cinema Q will chronicle Boulder's forty-year legacy of same-sex marriage

LimitedPartnershipstillweb2.jpg
Limited Partnership
Despite all the hoopla about Hillary Hall issuing same-sex marriage licenses in Boulder, marriage equality is not a new concept in that town. As Westword has reported, Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Clela Rorex issued the first same-sex marriage licenses in the country in the mid-1970s. Although the effort was short-lived, the results of Rorex's pioneering activism have been chronicled in Limited Partnership, the closing-night documentary at Cinema Q, the SIE FilmCenter's annual lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender film festival.

See also: Boulder County Clerk isn't horsing around with same-sex license deadline

More »

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...