Super Dungeon Explore creators Soda Pop Miniatures see a future for gaming in Denver

Categories: Games

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Courtesy of Soda Pop Miniatures
Super Dungeon Explore: Forgotten King doesn't look like your standard, blood-and-chainmail tabletop wargame. The monsters are rotund and cartoony, and the heroes, with their anime eyes and giant heads balanced on tiny bodies, look like children's toys. It's a remarkably gentle entry in a genre that takes violence as its primary theme, more Super Mario than Warhammer.

"[Miniatures games] have always addressed a very core audience of game players which are usually male; they're into the spikes and the blood and and the chainmail and all the gore, and that has its place" says John Cadice, founder of Soda Pop Miniatures, which designed the game. "But it felt distinctly vacant of a lot of the types of gaming that felt more inclusive -- being able to bring in kids, or sit down at the table with your girlfriend."

See also: How to get my job: board game designer

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Colorado Symphony gets in the game with OhHeckYeah

Categories: Games

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Game on! This summer two blocks of downtown Denver will be transformed into a massive, immersive street arcade. Brian Corrigan, the brains behind OhHeckYeah, has been working on the project for a couple of years, and this morning it took a big step forward when he teamed up with the Colorado Symphony in Boettcher Concert Hall and composer, William Hill, to record original sound effects for the video games.

See also: 100 Colorado Creatives: Brian Corrigan

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Five really cool, underappreciated games for the Xbox 360

Categories: Games

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The Xbox One hits stores this week: Playstation fans got their new hardware last week; you can go to the Xbox One launch party Thursday night at the Park Meadows Microsoft store. And that means the trusty Xbox 360 is in its twilight -- although it ain't over quite yet. In fact, iif history is any guide, the next year will actually see some of the system's best games released before the hardware finally fades away for good. And since people are still buying the system -- 166,000 Xbox 360s were sold in October, according to NPD data -- those people are going to be looking for some games to play. The 360's blockbuster franchises are well-known -- Call of Duty, Halo, Gears of War and so on -- but a layer or two deeper, the system has a reserve of some really cool, underappreciated games. In honor of those new Xbox 360 owners, as well as the longtime fans looking to squeeze a few more months of greatness out of the old system, we've rounded up five of these games, in a variety of categories, to keep you happily entertained with your "outdated" hardware.

See also: PS4 and Xbox One are here (and I don't care)

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PS4 and Xbox One are here (and I don't care)

Categories: Games, Geek Speak

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Tonight at big-box electronics stores and GameStops all over the country, as the clock ticks over to midnight, the next generation of gaming will officially begin with the launch of the PS4 (sorry, the WiiU doesn't count). Next week, the other shoe will drop in the form of the Xbox One. Hardcore gamers will line up for hours to be the first to get their hands on these high-end entertainment machines; if history is any guide, some of them will fight, and maybe get shot at, for the privilege. Thousands more will join them between now and Christmas, happily dumping their old machines in the closet and devoting their gaming love to the new shiny.

For the first time in this millenium, I won't be joining them.

See also: Ten milestones in the history of competitive gaming

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OhHeckYeah and Crave Dessert Bar collaborate to help bring video gaming to downtown streets

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Brian Corrigan and the Denver Theatre District have big plans to turn Champa Street between 14th Street and the 16th Street Mall into a life-sized video game arcade next summer, combining a number of media platforms to bring people together through gaming in the streets. Called OhHeckYeah, it's a big plan using a lot of technology, and that costs a dime. Corrigan has already raised money through grants and donations, and he has a major Kickstarter crowdfunding project in progress.

See also: 100 Colorado Creatives: Brian Corrigan

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Play more realistic Monopoly at tonight's Warm Cookies of the Revolution

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Many a Monopoly game has been upended over an accusation of cheating -- but what would happen if cheating was a predetermined part of the game? Tonight's Warm Cookies of the Revolution session, "Realistic Monopoly and Other Games," is based on the findings of a study conducted by psychologist Paul Piff at the University of California at Berkeley. As reported in an article in New York magazine, some participants started the game completely penniless, while others had huge stashes of cash.

See also: Evan Weissman on why Warm Cookies of the Revolution is good for your civic health

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Hot Tin Roof may be Colorado's best -- and last -- try at video games

Categories: Games

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A game about a rectangular detective with a fedora-sporting cat as a partner may be the freshest idea yet to come out of Colorado's anemic game-development scene.

Hot Tin Roof is the latest project by Denver-based developer Glass Bottom Games, which made its first splash with the charming side-scroller Jones On Fire,released last spring on iOS and Android. By using the same blocky art style but ditching the endless runner formula, Glass Bottom Games is now counting on this latest game to make the studio's name.

See also: Jones on Fire, by a Denver games developer, sets mobile gaming aflame


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100 Colorado Creatives: Brian Corrigan

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The OhHeckYeah Kickstarter video goes live during Denver Digerati's Friday Flash in September.
#40: Brian Corrigan.

Brian Corrigan dreams big -- in 3D -- and his latest project means to recreate cyberspace live on the streets of downtown Denver next summer as a way of bringing people and ideas together through life-sized gaming. If all goes according to plan, OhHeckYeah: An Immersive Street Arcade will utilize existing LED screens, monumental projections on buildings and street art in the Denver Theatre District to turn Champa Street between 14th Street and the 16th Street Mall into a living arcade, bringing characters alive via social media, cell phones and motion-controlled Microsoft Kinect devices. The underlying idea is one of creative community, that people who meet on the street through engaging in a game might go on to spark collaborations in the business world, too.

"I think the next creative economy is going to be a mash-of up Silicon Valley and Madison Avenue and Hollywood, and that's what Denver is -- all of those things are working together here," Corrigan says. "And the overarching thing about living in a real city is that you should be able to walk out of your house and just stumble onto the fun. If we can get one person to take an idea off the shelf and dust it off, we will have succeeded."

See also: 100 Colorado Creatives: Hollis + Lana


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I'm a sports nut for Magic: The Gathering

Categories: Games, Geek Speak

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Watch hours of this on TV? Yes, please!
Welcome to a new column called Geek Speak, in which we take on an aspect of geek culture each week.

The world championship of Magic: The Gathering is in Amsterdam this week. For the next four days, some of the world's best players will compete individually for the title of world champion, and on national teams in the World Magic Cup. Ten hours or more of coverage will be streamed online every day, and I'll be stuck to a computer screen every spare moment I can find, absorbing as much of it as I can.

See also:
- Dungeons and Dragons changed my life -- thanks, Gygax
- Ten best geek events in Denver in August
- Ten milestones in the history of competitive gaming

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Five lessons learned by a noob online gamer

Categories: Games, Lists

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My new fave -- and only -- online game.
Until recently, I avoided online games the same way I avoid Justin Bieber fans: by pretending with all my might that they don't exist. Then came Game of Thrones Ascent on Facebook, and since I am a fan of the books/show, I started playing -- and wandered into the bizarre and complex world of online gaming. I had absolutely no idea what this new experience would entail, but veteran online gamers have no problem telling you things you should know, along with plenty of things you never wanted to.

Here are the top five things I learned as a total noob online gamer. If knowledge is power, then I am now a supreme and benevolent leader of an entire kingdom that doesn't really exist.

See also:
- Ones and Zeros machinima fest to feature Leeroy Jenkins, local World of Warcraft hero
- LEGO Universe -- colorful plastic's answer to World of Warcraft -- is the brainchild of Colorado-based NetDevil
- Five Game of Thrones characters we never want to see naked


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