Ten best comedy events in Denver this March

broadcityweedphoto.jpg
Comedy Central's Broad City
As the arrival of spring melts away the remaining sludge of the February doldrums, comedy blooms anew in March. With visits from veteran standups, sets by hilarious newcomers and a chance to see the stars of TV's funniest sketch comedy series in person, there's a vast and crowded field of new entertainment options in Denver. While the lion's share of March's comedy offerings are imported, the lineup also includes a promising new free local showcase and the second round of the Comedy Works Funny Final Four contest. The fact that so many of these events take place in concert venues like the Gothic and Paramount is a testament to the drawing power of the headlining acts we have in town this month, as well as to Denver's boundless hunger for comedic entertainment. Here are the ten best comedy events to feed that hunger.

See also: Nikki Glaser on the Weirdo Olympics, stolen jokes and a new mattress

More »

Five most Cusackian John Cusack movies -- celebrate the actor tonight

cusackSayAnything.jpg
Say Anything, Gracie Films
Join These Things Matter hosts Kevin O'Brien and Taylor Gonda tonight at the Lost Lake Lounge for These Things Matter Night, a live podcast recording dedicated to the films of John Cusack, whose Rob Gordon character in High Fidelity inspired both the title of the podcast and the obsession with pop-cultural minutiae that keeps it going. "Cusack was one of the first things Taylor and I bonded over," says O'Brien. "I've discovered there is a whole legion of man-boys and lady-dudes who, like myself, spent [their] teen years trying to replicate Cusack's angst." To celebrate the career of the actor who continues to inspire them, Gonda and O'Brien have programmed a full evening of Cusack-related entertainment, with screenings and musical performances from SPELLS and Lisa Prank. They'll also be conducting brief interviews with any guest who wants to lionize Cusack for the podcast. Explains O'Brien: "We figured, why not hear from all the other Cusack-philes out there?"

In honor of tonight's event, Westword revisited the filmography of John Cusack and hand-picked his most definitively Cusackian roles. These movies are each thoroughly entertaining on their own merits, but together they illuminate the precise nature of Cusack's appeal. Old-school Cusack fans may notice the conspicuous absence of his broader '80s comedies. Unlike the man himself, Cusack movies like Better Off Dead have aged very poorly. 1985's The Sure Thing is a film that, like promise rings and the music of Rush, is strictly intended to entertain virgins. True fans can hardly begrudge this list, however, as it covers every shade of Cusack, and includes a legitimate masterpiece, two beloved cult classics, a half-forgotten potboiler that deserves a critical reappraisal, and a movie that features what is arguably the best boyfriend of cinema history in its ranks.

See also: Five cult classic horror movies inspired by books -- and available now!


More »

Horndribbles' Lucas Richards on hipsters, kid's toys and the Denver arts community

Lucas & Horndribbles.jpg
Burke Raby
Lucas Richards and his Cuddly Cryptozoological Creations.
Lucas Richards, creator of the Horndribbles, is ready to take his project to the next level. Initially, each Horndribble functioned like a unique soft sculpture; now Richards hopes to cut down on the labor involved in this labor of love in order to introduce the toys to a new generation.

Westword caught up with Richards in advance of Return of the Horndribbles, an event slated for April 15 at the Children's Museum, where he and his partner, Devon Braun of Explorer's Playground, will debut a story book and a line of Horndribbles manufactured for sale as toys. An RSVP is requested, as space is limited; visit the Facebook event page to let them know you're coming.

See also:
- Wild Ones: The Horndribbles will satisfy your animal urges
- Horndribbles Sexy Beast T-Shirt Bash
- Toot Your Own Horndribble


More »

Photos: The fifteen best Jell-O wrestling scenes from Lucha-Rama at Beauty Bar

Categories: Hipsters, Photos

lucharama 2013 1.jpg
All photos by Brandon Marshall.
Jell-O is good for your fingernails -- so rubbing it all over your body can't hurt, right? Over the weekend, Beauty Bar brought in gallons of the snack food for the latest Lucha-Rama, an event that combines both pit wrestling and lucha libre wrestling in two separate (and messy) battles. Continue reading for the fifteen best Jell-O scenes, and visit our full slide show for more photos.

See also:
- Slide show: Jell-O wrestling and luchadores at Beauty Bar
- Slide show: Lucha-Rama at Beauty Bar in September
- Lipgloss moves from La Rumba to Beauty Bar


More »

Demetri Martin on Woody Guthrie, prop-comedy and not being a hipster

Demetri Martin33.jpg
Demetri Martin is headed for Denver
Demetri Martin's polished micro-jokes, nervous stare and intense appreciation of aesthetics have made him a welcome antidote to the wave of loud and sloppy comedians who have dominated the scene over the last decade. In advance of Martin's visit to Comedy Works South this Sunday for two shows (one is sold-out), we caught up with the floppy-haired emodian (emo + comedian = emodian) to get his thoughts on music in standup, whether hipsters will die out, and what it was like being a 34-year-old "Senior Youth Correspondent" for The Daily Show.

See also:
- When Obama appears as Satan, where's Stephen Colbert?
- Comedian Adam Cayton-Holland debuts new podcast with Ben Roy interview
- Kickstarter campaign for Denver comedy documentary Joke Life now live

More »

Comedian Rory Scovel on crowd tension, Bobcat Goldthwait and why Aurora didn't steal Batman from him

Rory Scovel Headshot 2.jpg
Baby-faced Rory Scovel has been lighting up the comedy world with his classic observational humor, mixed with context-free voices that he applies randomly to no particular jokes or bits (he's been known to drift into a German accent at random points in the show, and may or may not continue with it throughout an entire set). After making the rounds of festivals and late-night television and starring in his own Comedy Central special, Scovel recently ventured into the dangerous world of sitcoms, selling a pilot to ABC in which he stars. Scovel will be performing through Sunday, February 3 at Comedy Works, and he recently sat down with us to chat improv, comedy politics and why the Aurora theater shootings could not destroy his pervasive obsession with Batman.

See also:
- Lewis black on socialism, Louis C.K. and the new NRA app
- T.J. Miller talks Dane Cook, Denver comedy, and eating mustard out of a can
- Getting stoned with comedian Chris Charpentier


More »

Colorado ID cuts coke but not tension on HBO's Girls

Girls CO ID 2.jpg
This ID was up to no good on Girls over the weekend.
On "Bad Friend," the episode of the zeitgeist-courting HBO comedy Girls that aired Sunday, the characters decide to buy some coke and indulge in cocaine-related hijinks. At one point, Lena Dunham's character, Hannah, and Andrew Rannell's Elijah are seen chopping out lines on a toilet seat and the camera lingers on the implement of choice: Elijah's Colorado ID.

See also:

- Of Mice and Menver
- Video: Adam Cayton-Holland makes his late-night TV debut on Conan
- An ode to Suburu, the unofficial car of Colorado


More »

Getting stoned with comedian/musician Chella Negro

Chella1.jpg
After years of performing her soul-folk songs around the Denver music scene, Chella Negro hooked up with this town's blossoming comedy community when she joined the all-female sketch group LadyFace.

Proudly public about her affection for ganja, Negro was the ideal candidate for our Getting Stoned With series, in which we sit down with our favorite entertainers to get lit and ask some strange questions.

See also:
- Kristin Rand, of the all-female comedy group Ladyface, talks standup versus sketch
- LadyFace's Chella Negro: Dick jokes are dead, but sketch comedy is alive and kicking
- Laugh your face off
- Getting stoned with comedian Chris Charpentier

More »

Lucky '13: Michael Trundle, Lipgloss co-founder and resident DJ

Categories: Hipsters

Trundle.jpg
This past year has been tough for many people, and we're eager to kiss 2012 goodbye. In hopes that 2013 will turn out to be much luckier for many, we invited some of the town's cultural tastemakers -- entrepreneurs and entertainers we're lucky to have in Denver -- to answer a trio of questions. We excerpted quotes from these Q&A's in the New Year's Guide inserted in the December 13 issue of Westword, but we'll be featuring the complete interviews in a series of posts through the end of the year. Up next: Michael Trundle.

For more than a decade, Michael Trundle has orchestrated the indie Friday nights on the dancefloor of Denver's sweatiest music fans. More than your typical flashes of strobe lights and generic beats, Lipgloss was founded and designed as a dance night for record nerds. In May, Trundle caused a bit of controversy when he moved Lipgloss from its established location at La Rumba, over to the newly minted Beauty Bar in Capitol Hill. In our interview, Trundle talks about his decision to move to a smaller venue, all in the name of preserving what he's always treasured about Lipgloss: eclectic music, sincere energy and more gay people.

See also:
Lucky '13: Keith Garcia, programming manager for the Sie FilmCenter
Lucky '13: Emily Tarquin from Off-Center@The Jones
Lucky '13: Matthew Brown of Fancy Tiger
Lipgloss moves from La Rumba to Beauty Bar
Michael Trundle reflects on ten years of Lipgloss


More »

James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem chooses Denver photo for Canon short-film project

smoke.jpg
Melissa Wollenberg
"Fires Be Damned!"
When Melissa Wollenberg of Highlands Ranch snapped a cute/surreal photo of her son in a gas mask, standing before the orange haze of this past last summer's out-of-control fires, she had no idea that it would eventually be chosen by film legend Ron Howard and LCD Soundsystem's James Murphy for their upcoming short-film project. "It was just a fluke," remembers Wollenberg, who submitted the improvised pic to Canon's Project Imagina10n photo contest, where it was selected (along with nine others) by Murphy as a storytelling directive for the film. "I was just really excited when I found out that the photo made it at all. I am a complete amateur and yet when I saw [my son in a gas mask], I had to take a picture. It was just a weird feeling. I didn't really have any expectations."

See also:
- LCD Soundsystem: Sound of Silver
- Gio Toninelo's Little Denver photography exhibit looks like big fun
- Month of Photography's The Big Picture: It just keeps getting bigger and bigger


More »

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...