Front Range Flag Company celebrates Colorado's spirit of adventure

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Front Range Flag Co. creates custom flags to celebrate Colorado adventures.
Jackie Barry's love for flags as celebratory beacons originated in Philadelphia, but it's the Colorado outdoors that inspires Front Range Flag Company. Barry and her business partner, Ryan Casey, launched the custom flag company early this summer to commemorate adventurous achievements big and small -- from going a short hike to climbing a Fourteener.

The two met in college in Philadelphia, where Barry developed her interest in fabrics and flags. She built miniature sailboats at the Independence Seaport Museum and even did her senior thesis on flags.

See also: Barista Jackie Barry creates whimsical art for adventurers

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Aspen Mountain to reopen for skiing this weekend!

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Jeremy Swanson
Aspen's season is not over yet.
Colorado's reality-defying weather has worked to a benefit this time around. The surge of late-spring snowfall around the state has allowed Aspen Mountain to reopen for the Memorial Day weekend, May 24 tthrough May 26.

See also: Take that, groundhog: Colorado resorts extend ski season as spring snow piles up

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Garland Park: Garland Park is my park, and why I'll reluctantly share it with you

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Our current cover story, Alan Prendergast's "Party in the Park," looks at how Denver's park rangers are gearing up for a busy summer season. In response, Westword writers are weighing in with appraisals of their own favorite Denver parks, continuing with Susan Froyd's tribute to Garland Park.

I'm a bit reluctant to sing the praises of Garland Park publicly, because I unfairly think of it as my park, and though that's not entirely true, there are moments when I seem to have it all to myself and my dogs.

See also: Cheesman Park: Haunted by fun (and angry ghosts, probably)


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Cheesman Park: Haunted by fun (and angry ghosts, probably)

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Our cover story this week, Alan Prendergast's "Party in the Park," looks at how Denver's park rangers are gearing up for a busy summer season. In response, Westword writers are weighing in with appraisals of their own favorite Denver parks, continuing with Byron Graham's tribute to Cheesman Park.

Denver's park-going residents have long enjoyed wiling away temperate afternoons sunning themselves on the gently sloping hills of Cheesman Park. Whether you're strolling through the park's neoclassical pavilion, enjoying the view of the distant cityscape over the treetops, or happening upon an especially festive Quinceañera, you'll always find good times in Cheesman Park -- along with the occasional human skull.

See also: City Park: A stroll in the heart of Denver

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City Park: A stroll in the heart of Denver

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The park's postcard-ready pavilion and mountain views.
Editor's note: Our cover story this week, Alan Prendergast's "Party in the Park," looks at how Denver's park rangers are gearing up for a busy summer season. In response, Westword writers are weighing in with appraisals of their own favorite Denver parks, starting with Prendergast's tribute to City Park.

City Park is not only the largest of Denver's parks, but also the most handsomely designed and -- for me, at least -- the most soul-soothing parcel of public land anywhere in town. I know this because it took me years to discover some of its more intriguing nooks, respites and redoubts, which is as it should be.

See also: Rethinking City Loop -- what City Park should be

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Civic Center MOVES wants you to move your workout to the park -- for free

Categories: Outdoors

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Courtesy of Civic Center Conservancy

Starting next week, the center of Denver could be the center of your workout. Civic Center Moves is just the latest project promoted by the Civic Center Conservancy to turn Civic Center Park into a more positive Denver space. "People make parks, so starting April 2a, when you work out for free at Civic Center MOVES, both you and Civic Center Park will get healthier," says Lindy Eichenbaum Lent, executive director of the Civic Center Conservancy.

See also: One Day in Denver invites filmmakers to document the city for a collective film


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Paul Wertin's "Arches" turns Vail into a wonderland of light and ice tonight

Categories: Art, Outdoors

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Molly Eppard
A tribute to ice, snow and light, Paul Wertin's temporary sculpture "Arches" opens tonight at the seventh annual Triumph Winterfest in Vail, when it will be illuminated with LED lights at dusk. Wertin began carving the icy structure from 120 blocks of ice earlier this month, creating a seventy-foot long serpentine ice wall that reaches seven feet in height in some places and is graced with three arches.

See also: Chill! Breckenridge opens ice castle

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Chill! Breckenridge opens ice castle

Categories: Art, Outdoors

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Ice sits in the bottom of glasses, decorates parties in elaborate formations, makes snowy Colorado roads slick in the winter. It also forms glittery structures, one of which stands tall at Breckenridge Riverwalk Center, on West Adams Avenue. The ice castle opened on December 26 there -- just the third location in the country where it can be viewed.

See also: Top five ways to survive negative temperatures and the onslaught of snow in Colorado

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Boulder Outdoor Cinema finishes season with Love Actually

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Love Actually, a lovely way to end a holiday series.
Boulder Outdoor Cinema may have temporarily moved indoors, but that doesn't mean the unsympathetic winter chill is keeping audiences from enjoying some heart-warming cinema. After a killer lineup of holiday films like Elf, A Christmas Story and National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, this free-of-charge series will round out its holiday theme on Monday, December 30 with the British rom-com Love Actually at the Bohemian Biergarten. In anticipation for of this universally beloved story of love's teeter-totter, we chatted with Boulder Outdoor Cinema co-founders Liz Marsh and Jeanine Fritz, discussing ensemble casts, film nerds and why Liam Neeson breaks our hearts.

See also: Amazon's new comedy pilots full of flops -- with the exception of Bill Murray and Grawlix

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Colorado Cyclist Jonathan Vaughters dishes on The Armstrong Lie, doping and Lance

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Photo by Frank Levasseur, Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics
Few people can claim to know Lance Armstrong in the same way as Jonathan Vaughters, a cyclist and native Coloradan who became Armstrong's friend, teammate -- and eventually, his enemy. Now, the CEO of Slipstream Sports is featured in a documentary called The Armstrong Lie, which is scheduled to open in Denver on December 13 and in Boulder next month (although the opening dates have already been pushed back several times). The film's director, Alex Gibney (We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks) had followed Armstrong during his unsuccessful 2009 Tour de France attempt, hoping to capture a second return to glory for the sport's most popular personality. Armstrong didn't win, and the film -- as originally conceived -- wasn't made.

See also: Gerrit Keats faces jail for threatening "f-ing pig" who banned Lance Armstrong

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