Colorado Photographers Document Disaster in Flood: A Thousand Year Event

01_Harwood_Feb.19.2014-5.09.10.jpg
Katie Harwood, "February 19, 2014, 5:09:10 PM," Archival Pigment Fiber Based Print, 2014.
When Front Range communities washed away in last year's torrential rains and subsequent floods, some folks who experienced the disaster firsthand did so with cameras in hand, documenting the stark power of nature as rivers jumped their banks to wreak havoc. A year later, the Dairy Center for the Arts will commemorate the Boulder region's floods with Flood: A Thousand Year Event, curated by Mark Sink and featuring images by seven of those photographers: James Balog, Andrew Beckham, Chris Brown, Charles Forsman, Kevin O'Connell, Richard Van Pelt and Katie Harwood. The show opens tonight with artist talks at 4 p.m. and a reception from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and runs through October 10. Admission is free. Keep reading for images from the exhibit.

See also: Viviane Le Courtois helps Boulder flood victims pick up the pieces through Rescued Memories


More »

Ralph-Michael Giordano recreates classic Hollywood photos with Colorado actors

KendraBuckasGloriaSwanson.jpg
Ralph-Michael Giordano
Kendra Buck as Gloria Swanson
Colorado's independent film scene is booming, says filmmaker and photographer Ralph-Michael Giordano, whose exhibition A Colorado Tribute to Classic Hollywood will be featured at Tenn Street Coffee and Books on First Friday, as part of the Tennyson Street Artwalk. Giordano has spent the last six months rebooting classic photographs of Hollywood stars. The new images feature fourteen Colorado actors posing as Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, Lana Turner, Elizabeth Taylor and beyond. In advance of the August 1 opening, Westword spoke with Giordano about his photographs and his homegrown homage to the Golden Age of Hollywood.

See also: Catherine Opie talks selfies, AIDS and her shift from representation to abstraction

More »

Photos: The Heads of Hydra couple up for an intimate exhibition at Carmen Wiedenhoeft

katy.taft.anthony.camera.jpg
Katie Taft and Anthony Camera
Lovers are already collaborators in life, but what happens when they collaborate as artists? Some would say that a deeper understanding comes into play under the circumstance, that couples creativity is different, perhaps more intimate, and rooted in unspoken simpatico. That's what Lovers Collaborations, a group project of the Heads of Hydra photography collective that opens Friday, August 1, at Carmen Wiedenhoeft Gallery, is all about.

"Anti-Curator" Richard Alden Peterson gave free rein to seventeen artist couples -- pairs that loosely range from married duos to good friends -- to create something together; even gallerist Carmen Wiedenhoeft doesn't know what the final product will look like. But as a preliminary tease, Peterson asked each couple to submit photographs of themselves with one requirement -- that their eyes be closed in the images. Keep reading to see the results.

See also: Review: Gildar Gallery makes a power play with Takeover

More »

Catherine Opie talks selfies, AIDS and her shift from representation to abstraction

Categories: GLBTQ, Photography

InaugurationHeads5.jpg
Catherine Opie
"Untitled #5 (Inauguration Portrait), 2009"
Catherine Opie began shooting photographs at the height of the AIDS crisis. Her portraits of LGBTQ people were born from the urgency of the moment: She was watching her friends die. Over the years, her work has evolved from documentary portraiture and landscapes toward greater abstraction and a study of her internal self. In advance of her artists' talk at Anderson Ranch, Opie spoke with Westword about shifts in her work and the LGBTQ community, and the purpose of photography in the age of the selfie.

See also: Sue Scott on women artists, getting into museums, feminism and her new book

More »

Photos: Suzanne Heintz leaves Chauncey the mannequin at the altar

heintz.1.jpg
More than a decade ago, Starz art director Suzanne Heintz decided there was a way to have a family and her freedom, too: She acquired a set of mannequins, including make-believe husband Chauncey and daughter Mary Margaret, and began photographing herself in vignettes with them for a project she calls Life Once Removed. This past Monday, she staged the greatest scenario ever in the project's history: A formal renewal of wedding vows at the elegant Grant Humphreys Mansion, with a mixture of human and plastic guests.

The joke's on Chauncey, though: Heintz took advantage of her place at the wedding podium to discuss her thoughts on commitment and her chosen life of spinsterhood, and left the poor mock man stiffly standing at the altar. Photographer Danielle Lirette was front and center to capture these images from the performance/celebration.

See also: Suzanne Heintz and her plastic love in Life Once Removed

More »

Photos: The costumes of Denver Comic Con

comicon.cosplay.1.jpg
More than 85,000 people walked through the aisles of the Denver Comic Con over the weekend, according to the folks behind the rapidly growing convention, and a lot of them were in costume. Con cosplay, after all, is an art unto itself, featuring hand-built costumery that can sometimes take months to create. Or not. Photographer Danielle Lirette brought back these images -- and more -- from the third annual event.

See also: Fans and celebrities at Denver Comic Con 2014

More »

Five great views -- both mountain and city -- around Denver

skylineBellview.jpg
Denver is a beautiful city, especially on days devoid of any brown cloud, and there are dozens of places where you can get a memorable shot. Here are five spots that offer a great view of the city or the mountains -- and, in some rare cases, both.

See also: Best Bathroom with a View of Denver -- Amato's Ale House

More »

Andrew Elijah Edwards on his new stereoscopic installation, The Deep Novelty Harvest Colony

HarvestColony1.jpg
Courtesy of Andrew Elijah Edwards
Ineffable is a dirty word for a writer. It means something like, "A concept you just can't put into words." Discussing The Deep Novelty Harvest Colony -- a stereoscopic art installation that makes its debut tonight at Hinterland Gallery -- with artist Andrew Elijah Edwards, you enter a philosophical wrestling match with the ineffable nature of his art. After all, his images are trying to create a visceral experience that he believes cannot be captured in language. In advance of the show's opening, Westword spoke with Edwards about the ideas behind his work.

See also: Christina Battle and Adán De La Garza on video art and the quasi-imperialistic nature of sound

More »

Andrew Novick's Unstill Life captures people in spontaneous moments

Categories: Art, Photography

Toof_Whip.jpg
Andrew Novick
"Toof Whip"
Whether he's stuffing his subjects' faces with food or taking pictures of them covered in their own blood, Andrew Novick takes photographs that document an always interesting and often delightfully weird time. This time around, the artist, collector, Peeps expert, Stanley Film Festival collaborator and Warlock Pincher looked to his vast archives of photos to put together a show of lively portraits titled Unstill Life, which opens with a reception (complete with sushi, drinks and music from DJ Gatsby) at 8 p.m. Friday, April 4 at Crimson Hilt Tattoo. "I didn't want to call it portraits, because that sounds either kind of professional or like you're at a mall," says Novick. "To me, a portrait is almost like a still life because someone's posing. Even though it's a live person it's a still life, whereas these picture are more off-the-cuff. Something was happening and I was just capturing it."

See also: 100 Colorado Creatives: Andrew Novick

More »

100 Colorado Creatives: Richard Alden Peterson

richard.peterson.1.jpg
#3: Richard Alden Peterson

From his stint documenting punk-rockers in the 1970s and snapping art images for the early Bay Area zine Search and Destroy to his current gig -- only one of many -- as house photographer at MCA Denver, Richard Alden Peterson has covered a lot of ground with camera in hand, and he still swaggers sweetly in the black leather jacket, striped T-shirts and yellow pants of another time. A former gallery owner and ongoing community-builder among his photography peers, Peterson has a national reputation and the skills to warrant it. He's become an essential part of the arts landscape here; read on to learn what keeps him going.

See also: 100 Colorado Creatives: Adam Lerner


More »

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...